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ReliefWeb
Briefing Kit for Situation Report + Vanuatu
Compiled on 18 May 2012
Contents
Vanuatu & Tonga: Tropical Cyclone Jasmine Situation Update No. 1 
............. 3
Tropical Cyclone Jasmine situation report No. 2 
............................ 7
Tropical cyclone Vania DREF operation n° MDRVU001 Final Report 
............ 13
Vanuatu: Tropical cyclone Vania DREF operation n° MDRVU001 Operations
update n° 1 
........................................................ 15
Vanuatu: Tropical cyclone Vania DREF operation n° MDRVU001 
............... 23
Tropical Cyclone Yasi Situation Update #3, 03 February 2011 
................. 30
Tropical Cyclone Yasi Situation Update #2, 02 February 2011 
................. 33
Tropical Cyclone Yasi Situation Update #1, 31 January 2011 
.................. 36
Vanuatu Volcanic Activity Situation Report 1 
.............................. 39
OCHA Situation Update No. 1 on Gaua Island Volcanic Activity, Vanuatu 
........ 41
Vanuatu Earthquake Situation Report 1 
.................................. 44
Vanuatu Floods Situation Report 1 
...................................... 47
Vanuatu Volcanic Eruption Situation Report 2 
............................. 49
Vanuatu Volcanic Eruption Situation Report 1 
............................. 52
Vanuatu: Volcanic Eruption OCHA Situation Report No. 1 
.................... 54
Vanuatu: Mt. Ambae Volcano Information Bulletin No. 2 
..................... 57
Vanuatu: Volcanic Eruption OCHA Situation Report No. 2 
.................... 60
Vanuatu: Mt. Ambae Volcano Information Bulletin No. 1 
..................... 62
Vanuatu: Volcanic Eruption OCHA Situation Report No. 1 
.................... 64
Vanuatu - Tropical Cyclone Ivy OCHA Situation Report No. 4 
.................. 66
Vanuatu - Tropical Cyclone Ivy OCHA Situation Report No. 3 
.................. 68
Vanuatu: Cyclone Ivy Information Bulletin No. 3 
............................ 70
Vanuatu - Tropical Cyclone Ivy OCHA Situation Report No. 2 
.................. 72
APCEDI Cyclone Ivy Alert No. 17 
....................................... 74
APCEDI Cyclone Ivy Alert No. 19 
....................................... 77
APCEDI Cyclone Ivy Alert No. 18 
....................................... 78
Vanuatu: Cyclone Ivy Information Bulletin No. 2 
............................ 82
Vanuatu - Tropical Cyclone P13/Ivy OCHA Situation Report No. 1 
.............. 84
Vanuatu: Cyclone Ivy Information Bulletin No. 1 - correction 
.................. 86
APCEDI Cyclone Ivy Alert No. 15 
....................................... 88
Vanuatu: Cyclone Ivy Information Bulletin No. 1 
............................ 92
APCEDI Cyclone Ivy Alert No. 14 
....................................... 94
Page 1/124
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APCEDI Cyclone Ivy Alert No. 13 
....................................... 98
APCEDI Cyclone Ivy Alert No. 16 
...................................... 101
Vanuatu - Hail, Landslides and Flooding OCHA Situation Report No. 1 
......... 104
Vanuatu - Earthquake OCHA Situation Report No. 1 
........................ 106
Vanuatu: Preliminary report: Earthquake and tsunami damage assessment in Port
Vila 
............................................................. 108
Vanuatu: Earthquake information bulletin No. 02/02 
........................ 119
Vanuatu - Earthquake OCHA Situation Report No. 2 
........................ 121
Vanuatu - Earthquake OCHA Situation Report No. 1 
........................ 123
Page 2/124
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/477747
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu & Tonga: Tropical Cyclone Jasmine Situation
Update No. 1
 
  Original published date:    17 Feb 2012   
  Country:    Vanuatu, Tonga   
  Theme:    Agriculture, Food and Nutrition, Water Sanitation Hygiene   
Content format:  Situation Report
  Language:    English   
  Source:    UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs   
  Disaster type:    Flood, Tropical Cyclone   
  Origin notes:    http://www.phtpacific.org/sites/default/files/situation_report/1/files/OCHA-PacificSitUpdateTCJasmine_VUT_TON.pdf   
  
  
This report is produced by OCHA in collaboration with humanitarian partners. It was issued by the OCHA Pacific office. It
covers the period from 10 to 17 February. Unless there are significant new development this will be the last report on this
event.
I. HIGHLIGHTs/key priorities
• TC Jasmine caused minor damage in Vanuatu’s TAFEA province, mainly to agriculture and water systems, as assessed by
members of the Vanuatu Humanitarian Team.
• It is expected that no emergency will be declared by the Government of Vanuatu, while needs and damages can be covered
by in-country capacity of government agencies and development partners.
• TC Jasmine caused flooding in Tonga’s main island of Tongatapu, leading to the evacuation of around 700 people.
 
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
20 Feb 2012
Page 3/124
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www.unocha.org
 
The mission of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) is to mobilize and coordinate effective 
and principled humanitarian action in partnership with national and international actors.
  
 
 
1
 
Vanuatu & Tonga
 • 
Tropical Cyclone Jasmine 
 
Situation Update 
No. 1
 
February 17, 2012 
 
This report is produced by OCHA in collaboration with humanitarian partners. It was issued by the OCHA 
Pacific office.  It covers the period from 10 to 17 February. Unless there are significant new development this 
will be the last report on this event. 
 
I. HIGHLIGHTs/key priorities
 
•  TC Jasmine caused minor damage in Vanuatu’s TAFEA province, mainly to agriculture and water 
systems, as assessed by members of the Vanuatu Humanitarian Team.  
•  It is expected that no emergency will be declared by the Government of Vanuatu, while needs and 
damages can be covered by in-country capacity of government agencies and development partners. 
•  TC Jasmine caused flooding in Tonga’s main island of Tongatapu, leading to the evacuation of 
around 700 people. 
 
II. Situation Overview
 
 
Tropical Cyclone Jasmine (cat 4), initially on course for Vanuatu’s capital Port Vila, brushed the southern 
province of TAFEA on 10 February. It then continued its course south and bending north towards southern 
Tonga, decreasing in strength (Cat 1) but also slowing down off Tongatapu. It has completed a small loop in 
its track south of Tonga. In doing so it has brought strong squally north westerly winds down over 
Tongatapu as well as quite heavy rain, while slowly moving away.  
 
 
Source: Pacific Disaster Centre 
 
Vanuatu  
TAFEA province (pop. 32,540, 2009 census), includes the islands of Tanna, Erromango, Futuna, Aneityum 
and Aniwa. Tanna and Aneityum reported initial damages by the cyclone, despite difficult communication 
The NDMO could not establish communication with Futuna and Aniwa islands.  
 
NDMO organized a fly-over followed by a multi-cluster rapid technical assessment by staff from national and 
provincial government departments, NGO’s (Oxfam, ADRA, Save the Children, Live & Learn, World Vision), 
church organisations and Vanuatu Red Cross, collaborating in the Vanuatu Humanitarian Team (VHT). 
Page 4/124
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www.unocha.org
 
The mission of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) is to mobilize and coordinate effective 
and principled humanitarian action in partnership with national and international actors.
  
 
 
2
 
Assessment teams found that  the relatively fast moving TC Jasmine has done only minor damage (mainly 
Tanna and Aneityum islands), mainly to agriculture and water systems. It is expected that no emergency will 
be declared by the Government of Vanuatu, while needs and damages can be covered by in-country 
capacity of government agencies and development partners.  
 
TAFEA Islands 
Area Council 
Population 
Households 
Aneityum Aneityum 
915 189 
Aniwa Aniwa 
341 
84 
Erromango North 
Erromango 
1,360  224 
Erromango South 
Erromango 
599  101 
Futuna Futuna 
526 
107 
Tanna Middle 
Bush 
Tanna  4,564 
812 
Tanna North 
Tanna 
4,303 
794 
Tanna South 
Tanna 
1,010 
226 
Tanna South 
West 
Tanna  4,329 
672 
Tanna West 
Tanna 
8,137 
1,423 
Tanna Whitesands 
6,456 
1,228 
  
Total 
32,540 
5,860 
Source: 2009 Census of Population and Housing, VNSO 
 
The National Disaster Committee (NDC) will consider the following recommendations addressing the impact 
of Tropical Cyclone Jasmine: 
•  A detailed assessment of Aneityum with representatives from Agriculture, WASH and NDMO; 
•  Supply of seeds and seedlings to communities identified with special agricultural and food security 
needs particularly in South West Tanna, North Tanna, Middle Bush. Provision of vegetable seeds to 
West and South West only to household that are farming on high grounds and sustained damages 
on garden crops due exposure to strong winds. 
•  Supply of water tanks (2 x 10,000 Lt, 1 x 6000 Lt and 100 x Jerry Cans) to Envitana and 
Ikamattaoareas (Tanna) that do not have access to good drinking water;
 
 
•  Rural Water Supply to repair water systems that were damaged or out of order and a WASH expert 
to undertake an assessment on Aneityum;  
•  Link the costs for the repair of Lenakel wharf to the shipping project about to start in Tanna. 
 
  
 
Storm surge on Aneityum (photo Oxfam)
                          
Damaged aid post in Lounatake (Tanna) (photo NDMO Vanuatu)  
 
To address pre-existing issues and ensure better disaster preparedness the NDMO also recommends: 
•  Ministry of Health to complete an audit throughout TAFEA and Vanuatu to ensure all medical 
facilities are maintained and well stocked, the process of ordering and delivering medical supplies is 
working and medical personnel that are allocated to areas are in place. 
•  NDMO as the lead agency for the logistics cluster to complete a communications audit throughout 
TAFEA and Vanuatu for Ministry of Health, Meteorology, Air Vanuatu, Police and other relevant 
organisations to ensure all HF Radios are working, properly tuned and accessible (e.g. to airports 
manager, police, health, chef, forecaster, CDC chairperson) for emergency communications with 
the NDMO.  
Page 5/124
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www.unocha.org
 
The mission of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) is to mobilize and coordinate effective 
and principled humanitarian action in partnership with national and international actors.
  
 
 
3
 
•  Ministry of Education to further plans to relocate the school in Aneityum; and 
•  Work with national radio broadcasters (Radio Vanuatu and FM 107) to ensure broadcast access to 
all communities.  
 
Tonga 
TC Jasmine brought heavy rains and flooding to Tonga’s main island of Tongatapu, which already had 
received much rainfall from TC Cyril a week earlier. Water has subsided. However, earlier this week low-
lying areas, particularly in the outskirts of Nuku'alofa, flooded resulting in the evacuation of over 400 people 
(about 71 families) to evacuation centres.  
 
The government of Tonga is mobilising pumps to remove excessive water from those low-lying areas. 
NDMO mentioned that in the low-lying areas, septic tank leakages may become a problem, but that the 
Ministry of Health was monitoring the situation closely to prevent any outbreak of disease. 
 
Media reported that power has been restored to most of Nuku'alofa, while critical infrastructure was not 
damaged.  Tourism officials said 'Eua, Ha'apai, the Vava'u group and off-shore island resorts in Tongatapu 
were not affected. However, a resort on Atata Island would be closed for two weeks due to damage caused 
by the cyclone. International and domestic flights services resumed on Thursday, following disruptions the 
previous two days. 
 
III. Contact
 
 
Please contact: 
Peter Muller, Regional Disaster Response Adviser for the Pacific 
Muller2@un.org
, +679-9991664 
 
For more information, please also visit www.phtpacific.org  
 
Page 6/124
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/477419
 
Vanuatu: Tropical Cyclone Jasmine situation report No. 2
Original published date:  08 Feb 2012
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Coordination, Education, Health, Logistics and Telecommunications, Shelter and Non-Food Items   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source:  Government of Vanuatu
  Disaster type:    Flood, Tropical Cyclone   
  Origin notes:    http://www.phtpacific.org/content/vut-ndmo-tc-jasmine-sitrep-no2   
  
  
Extract:
Situation General
Tropical Cyclone Warning Number 14 issued by the Vanuatu Meteorology and Geo-Hazards Department, Port Vila at
2:47pm VUT Wednesday 8 February 2012 for Tafea Province.
At 2:00pm local time today, Severe Tropical Cyclone Jasmine was located at 20.2 degrees South 168.9 degrees East. The
system is positioned at square letter H, number 10 (H,10) of the Vanuatu Cyclone Tracking map. This is about 85 KM south
southwest of Tanna and 95 KM west of Aneityum. Severe Tropical Cyclone Jasmine moved in an east southeast direction at
29 KM/HR in the past 12 hours.
The central pressure of the system is estimated at 941 hPa. Winds close to the centre estimated at 165 KM/HR. Severe
Tropical Cyclone Jasmine is expected to be at 21.6 degrees South 170.7 degrees East within the next 06 to 12 hours.
Very Destructive Storm to Hurricane force winds of 110KM/HR to 145KM/HR will continue to affect Tafea Province today
and tonight.
Current observations on Tanna indicated wind gusts of 100KM/HR. Marginal Gale force winds of 75KM/HR will continue to
affect parts of Shefa Province, but will quckly subside as the system moves further east southeast.
Very rough seas with phenomenal swells are still expected over all open waters of Vanuatu. Heavy rainfall and flooding,
including coastal flooding is also expected, mostly about southern parts of Shefa and Tafea Provinces. The National Disaster
Management Office (NDMO) advises people that Red Alert is now in force for Tafea Province . The Yellow Alert for Shefa
province has been cancelled. For action on the Alert given, call the National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) on 22699
or 23035.
The next warning on Severe Tropical Cyclone Jasmine will be issued at 6:00pm. People over Tafea Province should continue
to listen to all Radio Outlets to get the latest information on this system. This warning is also available on VMGD's website
 
17 Feb 2012
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Tropical Cyclone Jasmine  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SITUATION REPORT 
 
Incident/Event
: Tropical Cyclone Jasmine    
 
Strep No:  02 
 
Date: 08 February 2012       Time: 4.pm 
 
From: NDMO   
To:  NDC 
 
Copies to:  Hon Minister of Internal Affairs and other Govt Ministries, Cabinets 
Secretariat, Partners, UNICEF /UNOCHA, Red Cross Society, NGOS   
 
 
 
Situation General  
 
Tropical Cyclone Warning Number 14 issued by the Vanuatu Meteorology and  
Geo-Hazards Department, Port Vila at 2:47pm VUT Wednesday 8 February 2012 
for Tafea Province . 
 
At 2:00pm local time today, Severe Tropical Cyclone Jasmine was  
located at 20.2 degrees South 168.9 degrees East. 
The system is positioned at square letter H, number 10 (H,10) of 
the Vanuatu Cyclone Tracking map. This is about 85 KM south southwest of 
Tanna and 95 KM west of Aneityum. Severe Tropical Cyclone Jasmine 
moved in an east southeast direction at 29 KM/HR in the past 12 hours. 
 
The central pressure of the system is estimated at 941 hPa. Winds close 
to the centre estimated at 165 KM/HR. Severe Tropical Cyclone Jasmine is 
expected to be at 21.6 degrees South 170.7 degrees East within the next 
06 to 12 hours.   
 
Very Destructive Storm to Hurricane force winds of 110KM/HR to 145KM/HR 
 
REPUBLIQUE DE VANUATU 
DIRECTION 
DES SINISTRES NATURELS 
SAC POSTAL PRIVE 014 – PORT VILA 
Tel : 22392 
Fax : 24465 
E-mail: jesau@vanuatu.gov.vu 
“Safer, Secure and 
Resilient Vanuatu” 
Page 8/124
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will continue to affect Tafea Province today and tonight.  
Current observations on Tanna indicated wind gusts of 100KM/HR.     
 
Marginal Gale force winds of 75KM/HR will continue to affect parts of Shefa  
Province, but will quckly subside as the system moves further  
east southeast.  
 
Forecast Positions 
Date and Time                       Position                  Intensity 
+06 hours (8pm, 8 Feb)            20.9S, 169.9E            90 KTS (165 KM/HR) 
+12 hours (2am, 9 Feb)            21.6S, 170.7E            80 KTS (150 KM/HR) 
+18 hours (8am, 9 Feb)            22.4S, 171.3E            70 KTS (130 KM/HR) 
+24 hours (2pm, 9 Feb)            23.2S, 171.9E            60 KTS (110 KM/HR) 
+36 hours (2am, 10 Feb)           24.6S, 173.1E            50 KTS (95 KM/HR) 
+48 hours (2pm, 10 Feb)           25.7S, 174.8E            50 KTS (95 KM/HR) 
 
Very rough seas with phenomenal swells are still expected over all open 
waters of Vanuatu. Heavy rainfall and flooding, including coastal flooding is also 
expected, mostly about southern parts of Shefa and Tafea Provinces. The 
National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) advises people that Red Alert is  
now in force for Tafea Province . The Yellow Alert for Shefa province has been 
cancelled. For action on the Alert given, call the National Disaster Management 
Office (NDMO) on 22699 or 23035.  
 
The next warning on Severe Tropical Cyclone Jasmine will be issued at 6:00pm.  
People over Tafea Province  should continue to listen to all Radio 
Outlets to get the latest information on this system. This warning is also 
available on VMGD's website www.meteo.gov.vu  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 9/124
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Location: 
  
Vanuatu Meteorological Service 
TROPICAL CYCLONE WARNING CENTRE PORT VILA  
TROPICAL CYCLONE FORECAST TRACK MAP 
Severe Tropical Cyclone Jasmine 
Tropical Cyclone Forecast Track Map Number 19 issued at 2:51 pm VUT Wednesday 8 February 2012 
 
 
Source: VMGD
 
 
 
SITSTAT:    
 
&# !0'+%  '+ #/0 ++ 3/ .#-,.0'+% -,0#+0') %."#+ "*%# #25 .'+ +"  '% 32#
/3#))/ ,0#+0') $),,"'+% / !.##(/ +" .'2#./ '+!.#/'+% 3'0& 30#.
, "*%# .#-,.0/ $,. 0&# ,0&#. -.,2'+!#/ "1.'+% 0&# )/0  &,1./ $,. &#$ )*- +"
$# -.,2'+!#/ ,3#2#. 0&'/ ,+ !,*'+% !5!),+# +,3 -)!#/ -#,-)# '+ $# #/0'*0#"
-,-1)0',+ '/
 -#,-)# .# +,3 0 .'/(
 
POTENTIAL RISKS: 
 
#,-)# *,/0 0 .'/( 3,1)"  # 0&,/# '+ .1.) .#/ 0&0 "#-#+" ,+ /1 /'/0#+!# %.'!1)01.# $,.
0&#'. )'2#)'&,," +" 21)+#. )# *#* #./ ,$ 0&# !,**1+'05 $ 0&# !5!),+# "#/0.,5/ *,/0 $,,"
!.,-/ -#,-)# 3')) +##" .#)'#$ /1--)'#/ ,$ $,," &# 21)+#. )# .# /,*#0'*#/ '%+,.#" 3&#+
-#,-)# .# -.#-.'+% $,. "'//0#. +" 0&#.#$,.# +##"/ /-#!') 00#+0',+  5 !,**1+'05 )#"#./
+" 0.'+#" -#,-)# '+ 0&# !,**1+'0'#/
Page 10/124
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AFFECTED POPULATION: 
 
Humanitarian Action to date. 
 
At 2.45am  a village at Prima Bridge was relocated to Lycee school in Port Vila.(Efate 
Province)  The village consisted of 111 people. (42 males, 31 females and 38 children. 
The police and NDMO staff provided transport for relocation and support for villages to 
gather basic food supplies while under yellow alert and then to be returned after the 
cyclone alert was cancelled for Shefa province.  
 
 
SECTORAL IMPACTS:
 
 
Health service-  
Currently all services are functioning throughout the country but will be closing down 
offices this afternoon in preparation for TC Jasmine. NDMO has been liaising with 
Ministry of Health staff in Tafea Province.  
 
Telecommunication-    
All existing communication systems are working in all the provinces. The NDMO is 
compiling a list of all available communication systems and locations on all the islands 
and coverage and has arranged red alert text messages for the Tafea province with 
the VMGD and Digicel 
 
Transportation – 
 
NDMO has made arrangements with JPOC and FRANZ for access to emergency 
transportation for emergency assessments.  All commercial flights have been cancelled 
in and out of Vanuatu as a precautionary measure.  
 

&#)0#. 6
 Evacuation centres have been identified in churches and schools in Tafea for 
provincial police and communities to move to during the red alert. 
0#. 6
,0&'+% 0, .#-,.0
)#!0.'!'05 /1--)5
,0&'+% 0, .#-,.0
"1!0',+
,/0 /!&,,)/ .# /0')) ,+ &,)'"5 +" /&,1)" .#/1*# +#40 3##( &#  '/ 3,.('+% !),/#)5
3'0& 0&# "1!0',+ )1/0#. 0, '"#+0'$5 )''/# /!&,,)/ +" -.,2'+!') #"1!0',+ /0$$ +"
-.#-,/'0',+ #*#.%#+!5 /!&,,) ('0/ '+ -.#-.0',+  
Page 11/124
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 SCIENTIFIC MONITORING: 
 
The Vanuatu Meteorological and Geo-hazard Department will continue to follow the 
system closely and give out regular updates to the public through radio broadcast and 
email.  
 
CURRENT OPERATION  
 
&#  +"  &2#  ##+ !0'20#" +" -.#-.0',+/ .# 1+"#.35 /'+!# 5#/0#."5
/1!& /
 
,+0'+1# "2'/,.5 '+$,.*0',+  .,"!/0 0&.,1%& ."',  .,"!/0
 
,**1+'!0',+ 3'0& .,2'+!') ,2#.+*#+0/ 0, !,,."'+0# '+$,.*0',+ $),3 0, !,**1+'0'#/
+" //'/0 3'0& !5!),+# .#/-,+/# -)+ '+ $# -.,2'+!#
 
,+0!0 1-"0# $,. )) -.0+#./ '+ ,.0 ') +" $# .,2'+!#
 
"#+0'$'!0',+ ,$ #2!10',+ /'0#/ '+ ,.0 ') +" .,2'+!#/
 
-"0# '"#+0'$'!0',+ ,$ !,**1+'!0',+ /5/0#*/ 0&0 .# 3,.('+% '+ $# .,2'+!#/ +"
0&#'. !,2#.%#
 
##0'+% 3'0& )) /0)( &,)"#./ $,. 1-"0# ,+ -.#-.#"+#// $.,*  +" 0&#'. /1--,.0 0,
0&'/ -.,!#// +"
 
-"0# 0,  $,. 0&#'. "#!'/',+
 
      
 
Recommendations: 
 
 
1.  The VMGD and NDMO continue to update the public with latest information and 
advisory information;  
2.  NDMO to coordinate closely with JPOC situation in Tafea province;  
3.  NDMO to continue coordinating with Vanuatu Government agencies, VHT 
members and donors to mobilise emergency staff and resources to respond after 
the initial reports are receive from Tafea; and 
4.  Consult with NDC Chairman for response to Tafea province. 
Page 12/124
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/426892
 
Vanuatu: Tropical cyclone Vania DREF operation n° MDRVU001 Final
Report
 
  Original published date:    20 Jul 2011   
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Agriculture, Contributions, Coordination, Food and Nutrition, Recovery and Reconstruction, Shelter and Non-Food Items, Water
Sanitation Hygiene
  Content format:    Evaluation and Lessons Learned, Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    IFRC   
  Disaster type:    Tropical Cyclone   
Origin notes:  http://www.ifrc.org/docs/appeals/11/MDRVU001DREFFR.pdf
  
  
The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent (IFRC) Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) is a source of
un-earmarked money created by the IFRC in 1985 to ensure that immediate financial support is available for Red Cross Red
Crescent response to emergencies. The DREF is a vital part of the IFRC’s disaster response system and increases the ability
of National Societies to respond to disasters.
Period covered: 6 February to 13 April 2011
DREF history:
CHF 90,322 was initially allocated on 6 Feb 2011 from the IFRC’s DREF to support the National Society to respond to the
needs of 2,500 households.
This Disaster Relief Emergency Fund’s (DREF) plan of action was later revised. The changes were as follows:
• Provision of relief supplies as goods in kind bilaterally from Australian Red Cross, including international air freight.
• Provision of local freight for transport by Vanuatu National Disaster Management Organization (NDMO).
• Less than expected number of volunteer days required for assessments and distribution.
• Assessment data confirmed water sources were fit for human consumption, thereby removing the requirement for water
treatment.
• Increase in the number of households targeted by Vanuatu Red Cross Society (VRCS) from 2,500 to 2,906.
 
20 Jul 2011
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We met some errors and the attached PDF couldn't be included in this report. Please download at 
http://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/MDRVU001DREFFR.pdf
.
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/391515
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu: Tropical cyclone Vania DREF operation n°
MDRVU001 Operations update n° 1
 
  Original published date:    11 Mar 2011   
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Coordination, Shelter and Non-Food Items   
Content format:  Situation Report
  Language:    English   
  Source:    IFRC   
  Disaster type:    Tropical Cyclone   
  Origin notes:    http://www.ifrc.org/docs/appeals/11/MDRVU001drefOU1.pdf    
  
  
Period covered by this Ops Update: 6 February to 6 March 2011. 
Summary: On 19 February, a third tropical cyclone (named Atu) very quickly intensified into a category 4 that moved slowly
south to the east of Vanuatu. Over 21 and 22 February, tropical cyclone Atu passed through Tafea province, between Futuna
and Tanna Islands and just East of Aniwa and Aneitym Islands. This weather system caused further damage to the outer
islands of Tafea province. It also stopped all sea freight/transport and many flights were cancelled in the region. Shipments of
supplies to regions affected by tropical cyclone Vania were put on hold until tropical cyclone Atu had passed. 
In addition to IFRC support, Australian Red Cross provided relief items and freight as goods in kind to the value of CHF
35,260. French Red Cross supported VRCS with a WatSan delegate and water quality testing kits to assist in testing the
quality of affected water supply source across Erromango Island and parts of Tanna Island. 
Initial reports identified needs for 2,500 families (some 14,035 beneficiaries). But after assessments were complete, the
number of affected families increased up to 2,978 families (approximately 16,677 beneficiaries). The identified needs were
food, agriculture rehabilitation, non-food items and water and sanitation. Government of Vanuatu conducted the distribution
of food, with the preparation support of VRCS volunteers. The Government of Vanuatu is progressing further agriculture
assessments with an aim to distribute seeds and cuttings and provide assistance as required. 
IFRC and VRCS coordinated with the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) cluster, led by UNICEF, who developed a joint
plan of action for all agencies to address water and sanitation needs. Assessments conducted by VRCS confirmed that water
sources had returned to their pre-cyclone quality and there was no need for emergency household water treatment, through
water purification tablets. Many water supply systems however were damaged in this as well as previous cyclones and were
assessed to determine the extent of repair required. A plan for rehabilitation of the water system infrastructure was agreed
with the WASH cluster, to be led by the Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA), which will be supported by
VRCS (through funds from and outside DREF, donated by Oxfam) although implemented by the local communities. 
VRCS has identified communities in Tafea province which require replacement mosquito nets. They are working with the
Ministry of Health malaria programme to coordinate the distribution of nets to these communities. 
Assessments also confirmed that the majority of communities were well informed of the approaching cyclone(s) and made
appropriate preparations. 
The distribution of emergency relief items was completed over the reporting period. To date, the operation has provided
5,288 jerry cans and bars of soap to over 2,600 families in the affected areas. Hygiene promotion materials were distributed
with the distribution of non food items. 
DG ECHO, Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and Netherlands Red Cross has made contributions
towards the replenishment of the DREF for the allocation made to this operation. 
The operation is expected to be completed by 6 May 2011; a Final Report will be made available by 6 August 2011.
 
11 Mar 2011
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Vanuatu: Tropical 
cyclone Vania
DREF Operation n° MDRVU001 
GLIDE
TC-2011-000009-VUT
TC-2011-000015-VUT
Operations update n° 1 
11 March 2011 
The International Federation’s Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) is a source of un-earmarked money 
created by the Federation in 1985 to ensure that immediate financial support is available for Red Cross and Red 
Crescent response to emergencies. The DREF is a vital part of the International Federation’s disaster response 
system and increases the ability of national societies to respond to disasters.
Period covered by this Ops 
Update:  
6 February to 6 
March 2011. 
Summary: On 19 February, 
a third tropical cyclone 
(named Atu) very quickly 
intensified into a category 4 
that moved slowly south to 
the east of Vanuatu. Over 21 
and 22 February, tropical 
cyclone  Atu passed through 
Tafea province, between 
Futuna and Tanna Islands 
and just East of Aniwa and 
Aneitym Islands. This 
weather system caused 
further damage to the outer 
islands of Tafea province. It 
also stopped all sea 
freight/transport and many 
flights were cancelled in the 
region. Shipments of supplies 
to regions affected by tropical 
cyclone Vania were put on hold until tropical cyclone Atu had passed. 
In addition to IFRC support, Australian Red Cross provided relief items and freight as goods in kind to the value of 
CHF 35,260. French Red Cross supported VRCS with a WatSan delegate  and water quality testing kits to assist 
in testing the quality of affected water supply source across Erromango Island and parts of Tanna Island.  
Initial reports identified needs for 2,500 families (some 14,035 beneficiaries). But after  assessments were 
complete, the number of affected families increased up to 2,978 families (approximately 16,677 beneficiaries). 
The identified needs were food, agriculture rehabilitation, non-food items and water and sanitation. The 
Vanuatu Red Cross Society volunteers sorting out relief items for distribution.  
Photo: Vanuatu Red Cross Society. 
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2
Government of Vanuatu conducted the distribution of food, with the preparation support of VRCS volunteers. The 
Government of Vanuatu is progressing further agriculture assessments with an aim to distribute seeds and 
cuttings and provide assistance as required. 
IFRC and VRCS coordinated with the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) cluster, led by UNICEF, who 
developed a joint plan of action for all agencies to address water and sanitation needs.  Assessments conducted 
by VRCS confirmed that water sources had returned to their pre-cyclone quality and there was no need for 
emergency household water treatment, through water purification tablets. Many water supply systems however 
were damaged in this as well as previous cyclones and were assessed to determine the extent of repair required. 
A plan for rehabilitation of the water system infrastructure was agreed with the WASH cluster, to be led by the 
Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA), which will be supported by VRCS (through funds from and 
outside DREF, donated by Oxfam) although implemented by the local communities. 
VRCS has identified communities in Tafea province which require replacement mosquito nets. They are working 
with the Ministry of Health malaria programme to coordinate the distribution of nets to these communities. 
Assessments also confirmed that the majority of communities were well informed of the approaching cyclone(s) 
and made appropriate preparations.  
The distribution of emergency relief items was completed over the reporting period. To date, the operation has 
provided 5,288 jerry cans and bars of soap to over 2,600 families in the affected areas. Hygiene promotion 
materials were distributed with the distribution of non food items.  
DG ECHO, Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and Netherlands Red Cross has made 
contributions towards the replenishment of the DREF for the allocation made to this operation. 
The operation is expected to be completed by 6 May 2011; a Final Report will be made available by 6 August 
2011. 
<click here to view contact details> 
The situation 
In just over one month, Vanuatu was affected by three successive tropical cyclones. First on 12-13 January, 
tropical cyclone Vania as a category 1, impacted Tafea province in southern Vanuatu. The weather system 
associated with tropical cyclone Vania included prolonged winds and rains causing considerable damage to 
several staple and cash crops, destroyed livelihoods, and damaged homes, water system infrastructure, roads 
and schools. As a result, the Vanuatu NDMO has been coordinating the response to tropical cyclone  Vania. As 
part of this coordination, a WASH cluster group was formed by a number of agencies, lead by UNICEF. 
On 30 January, tropical cyclone Yasi passed through the Banks Island group in Torba province in the north of 
Vanuatu, bringing heavy rain, damaging winds and 3-4 meter high storm surge waves.  
On 20-22 February, tropical cyclone Atu formed in the west of Vanuatu and built into a category 4 cyclone as it 
passed through the Tafea province in southern Vanuatu. This second cyclone in the south hit outer island 
communities with a second blow that further damaged what was left of their staple and cash crops. 
Communications to these island communities were limited and in some cases not possible at all until such time as 
rapid assessments teams were able to be flown out to the islands. 
Coordination and partnerships 
VRCS continues to coordinate closely with the Vanuatu NDMO and other agencies in deploying joint 
assessment teams, mobilizing volunteers for food distribution and sharing information. The VRCS team was 
initially supported in this response by French Red Cross, which has a delegation in-country and IFRC through 
its global disaster management resources, including the regional office in Suva and Asia Pacific disaster 
management Unit, located in Kuala Lumpur. 
French Red Cross was able to quickly mobilize additional support in the form of a WatSan delegate from New 
Caledonia who also brought water testing kits. In addition, since 14 February, VRCS has also been supported 
by an IFRC country team representative in Port Vila. 
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Relief items have been mobilized quickly in a coordinated manner from the regional warehouses of the French 
Red Cross in New Caledonia and from Australian Red Cross warehouse in Brisbane. 
VRCS primary response has been in support of the WASH cluster response plan, lead by UNICEF. Within this 
plan VRCS completed assessments of the source water quality and water supply infrastructure on Erromango 
Island, Aniwa Island and parts of Tanna Island: South West, South and White Sands. Given the challenges of 
remote access to the affected communities and as part of these assessments, VRCS distributed jerry cans and 
soap to the affected families during the assessment. 
The WASH cluster brought together information from all water supply assessments to prepare a plan for the 
rehabilitation of water supply systems across the province. The WASH cluster plan will be implemented through 
a combined programme with UNICEF, ADRA, VRCS, Rural Water Supply and the Tafea Provincial Disaster 
Committee. VRCS contribution to date has been the provision of logistics resources, procurement of water 
infrastructure materials (by way of Oxfam funding) and the chartering of sea freight for transportation of 
materials. 
National Society Capacity Building:  
In all locations visited and assessed by VRCS it was identified that communities were well informed of the 
coming cyclones and prepared appropriately for them: covering water sources, securing loose items (including 
the removal of guttering from rain water catchment systems) and gathering in secure buildings. VRCS local 
emergency response and first aid volunteers were actively involved in the preparation of their own communities 
for the cyclones and assisted in the assessments and distributions after the cyclone. Around 50 VRCS 
volunteers are involved in this operation and have been insured under the DREF coverage. 
During the source water quality testing the French Red Cross delegate trained VRCS staff and volunteers on 
how to complete water quality testing. These staff and volunteers were then deployed to other locations to 
undertake testing. 
Red Cross and Red Crescent action 
VRCS mobilised teams that have completed assessments across Tafea province; Erromango Island, Aniwa 
Island and Tanna Island (South-West, South and White Sands regions). Assessments completed included: 
source water quality testing, water supply system damage assessment and community disaster assessments. 
VRCS covered a population of up to 2,850 households in their assessments. The information has ben shared 
with partners and donors and has helped to have a good coordination in place. Following these assessments 
VRCS distributed jerry cans and soap to all affected communities assessed to meet water and sanitation needs. 
VRCS mobilised five volunteers for three days in Tafea province to assist in the logistics and preparation of 
distribution of food supplied as part of the Vanuatu NDMO response activities. 
VRCS has identified communities in Tafea province who require replacement mosquito nets. They are working 
with the Ministry of Health malaria programme to coordinate the distribution of nets to these communities. 
VRCS are supporting the WASH cluster water supply rehabilitation programme by way of procurement of water 
infrastructure materials, sea freight of those materials to all islands in Tafea province and the logistics resource 
to manage this process. This support provides for 39 per cent of the WASH cluster water supply rehabilitation 
programme budget. 
Progress towards outcomes 
Due to the needs identified by the assessment teams and the intervention of other partners, the plan of action has 
been revised as follows:
Water, sanitation and hygiene promotion 
Outcome:  The risk of water-related diseases has been reduced through the provision of safe water and 
hygiene items to 2,906 households in Tafea province for three months. 
Outputs (expected results) and activities planned:  
x  Assess the existing coverage with a view of ensuring availability of an adequate water supply. 
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4
x  Provide potable water, appropriate sanitation and hygiene promotion for as determined by the assessment 
to 2,906 households in Tafea province. 
x  Distribute WASH safety kits to the most affected families: each kit including jerry cans, soap and hygiene 
promotion material. 
x  Provide resources to support the Rural Water Supply and Ministry of Health in the rehabilitation of water 
supply infrastructure. 
x  Hygiene promotion activities by trained volunteers and provision of hygiene promotion materials. 
Progress:
x  Assessments completed in all locations. The test results for most water sources passed as safe for 
human consumption with only a few instances of low contamination of bacteria. Due to these reasons, 
distribution of water purification tablets was cancelled as there was no longer a requirement for 
emergency household water treatment.  
x  Water supply systems were damaged by the cyclone and details of repairs required passed on to the 
WASH Cluster. Donor contributions direct to the WASH cluster activities were suffice for the 
procurement of supplies.  
x  VRCS has provided ongoing logistics support to the WASH cluster programme in the form of: assistance 
in quotations, procurement of supplies and chartering of sea freight for supplies to be sent. Current plans 
(weather dependant) are for transit for supplies 10-15 March.  
x  Assessment showed that many locations were without essential hygiene supplies and hence the need 
for distribution of soap and hygiene awareness materials. 
x  Ongoing bad weather and tropical cyclone Atu delayed VRCS ability to access locations such as Dillons 
Bay on Erromango Island and Aniwa Island for assessment. It also delayed transport of relief items to 
Tafea province. 
x  Distribution of jerry cans and soap to households completed in Erromango (East) and Tanna (South 
West, South, South East / White Sands). Good hygiene messages were also distributed and discussed 
at each of the distribution locations. 
x  Distribution of WASH kits to households in Erromango (Dillons Bay) and Aniwa Island planned for 10-15 
March. 
Households
Population*
* population estimates for some regions
Erromango
299
1726
North Erromango
180
1039
South & Dillons Bay
119
687
Total Tanna
2446
10071
South West Tanna
128
1300
South Tanna
439
2062
2 villages (52 households) not included in assessment
SE Tanna/White
Sands
1879
6709
Aniwa
161
527
TOTAL
2906
11371
Jerry Cans
Received
Required
Despatched
Distributed
In stock
VRCS DP Stock
600
600
Australian Red Cross
5000
0
PIROPS
1200
948
in stock Port Vila
Tanna
4892
4892
4892
Erromango North
360
548
375
173
in stock Ipota
South & Dillons Bay
238
despatch due 10th March
Aniwa
322
despatch due 10th March
6200
5812
5440
5267
1721
Soap
Required
Despatched
Distributed
In stock
Erromango North
432
288
144
in stock Ipota
Tanna
4892
5000
5000
0
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5
South & Dillons Bay
238
despatch due 10th March
Aniwa
322
despatch due 10th March
Mosquito Nets
Received
Australian Red Cross
700
x  During assessments household information was collected. Distribution of jerry cans and soap was made 
to households in the above region as based on the needs assessments. In some cases, the number of 
households as listed by VRCS was different to those listed by provincial authorities. For example, on 
Aniwa Island the number of households as recorded by VRCS was 45 more than that of provincial 
authorities. Many of the uncounted households were widow/single mother households were not included 
in the provincial authority count. 
x  Distribution of WASH kits has differed depending on locality. On Erromango Island VRCS distributed 
direct to households understanding the logistical difficulties of the region. In Tanna distribution was made 
in each village to the head of the family or their nominated representative. 
Challenges:
x  Tafea province provides for many logistical difficulties with poor weather resulting in many flights cancelled 
and sea freight delays. Locations such as Dillons Bay on Erromango Island and Aniwa Island were 
unreachable until 26 February at which time VRCS were able to charter a small flight. Some areas in Tanna 
were completely inaccessible due to poor road conditions exacerbated by the weather. VRCS  assessment 
teams were unable to reach these locations; however distribution teams two weeks later were  able to ensure 
distribution made it to them. 
Relief distributions (basic food and non-food items) 
Outcome: The essential household needs of 2,906 households are met within three months in Tafea province 
through the distribution of food and non food-items (i.e. mosquito nets and hygiene kits), as determined by the 
assessment findings.
x Support to ongoing needs and capacity assessments. 
x Train volunteers on distribution procedures. 
x Develop beneficiary targeting strategy and registration system to deliver intended assistance. 
x Distribute relief supplies and control supply movements from point of dispatch to end user. 
x Replenishment of pre-positioned relief stocks. 
x Provide essential volunteer resources to support the Vanuatu NDMO in the distribution of food. 
x Monitor and evaluate the relief activities and provide reporting on relief distributions. 
Progress:
x  The number of beneficiaries has increased from 2,500 families to 2,906 due to more accurate information 
available from the assessments. 
x  35 volunteers have been trained in assessment activities and distribution. 
x  Jerry cans and soap were distributed to 2,906 households in the affected region, population information 
based on that captured during the assessments. 
x  For distribution, all goods were transported accompanied by VRCS volunteers. Distribution was managed in 
the field by either VRCS staff or local ERT trained volunteers. All volunteers active in the distribution were 
trained by VRCS prior to the distribution. 
x  VRCS was able to replenish their disaster preparedness stock of 600 jerry cans which were used in the first 
phase of distribution under this DREF. 
x  VRCS mobilised volunteers in Tafea Province to assist local authorities in the preparation of distribution of 
food items from 26 February-4 March. 
x  An evaluation of this operation is being prepared to: 
o  Examine if the DREF operation has achieved its goal, objectives and expected results. 
o  Assess key achievements, challenges and areas of success, as well as areas for improvement within 
the operation and make recommendations to replicate or improve future disasters response. 
o  Identify lessons learned and good practices for sharing. 
x  Rapid emergency assessment completed on Aniwa Island Saturday 26 February following tropical cyclone 
Atu. VRCS team members met with local volunteers and the village chief to discuss the effect of both tropical 
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6
cyclone VAnia and tropical cyclone Atu. Food security and agriculture were reported as the greatest need with 
staple and cash crops significantly damaged by the two cyclones. 
x  VRCS has identified some communities in North Erromango and two villages in Tanna whose mosquito nets 
are more than three years old and hence due for replacement. It aims to distribute 360 nets for 180 families. 
However, detailed assessments highlight that the majority of households have and use mosquito nets. This is 
due to an ongoing malaria programme run by the Vanuatu Ministry of Health. For this reason, VRCS has 
delayed the distribution of mosquito nets to ensure that its contribution helps in meeting the objectives and 
priorities of the Ministry of Health  in the above-mentioned communities. The Ministry of Health  would like to 
ensure that distribution by VRCS is fully coordinated within their programme so there is no overlap and to 
ensure there is no confusion by beneficiaries in regards to the different manufacture of the nets and the 
organization distributing the nets.  
Challenges:
x  Logistics and communication issues continued to be a challenge throughout the response effort. For example, 
due to a shortage of fuel on the island, the VRCS volunteers carried their loads of empty jerry cans and 
hygiene products overland, walking for up to five days to reach all the communities in the affected area.  
x  As noted above, there is delay in the distribution of mosquito nets. The national society is closely coordinating 
with the Ministry of Health  to ensure that its activities complement on-going malaria prevention and control 
efforts and to agree on distribution mechanisms.  
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7
How we work 
All IFRC assistance seeks to adhere to the
 Code of Conduct for the International Red Cross and Red 
Crescent Movement and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO's) in Disaster Relief
and the 
Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response (Sphere)
 in delivering 
assistance to the most vulnerable. 
The IFRC’s vision is to inspire, encourage, 
facilitate and promote at all times all forms of 
humanitarian activities by National Societies, with 
a view to preventing and alleviating human 
suffering, and thereby contributing to the 
maintenance and promotion of human dignity and 
peace in the world.   
The IFRC’s work is guided by Strategy 2020 which puts 
forward three strategic aims: 
1. Save lives, protect livelihoods, and strengthen 
recovery from disaster and crises. 
2.  Enable healthy and safe living. 
3.  Promote social inclusion and a culture of non-
violence and peace.  
Contact information
For further information specifically related to this operation please contact:  
In Vanuatu Red Cross National Society: 
x Jacqueline de Gaillande Secretary General, phone:+ 678 27258 email: 
redcross@vanuatu.com.vu
Pacific Regional Office for the International Federation, Suva: 
x Aurelia Balpe, Head of Pacific Regional Office, phone: +679 331 1855; 
email:
aurelia.balpe@ifrc.org
x Ysabeau Rycx, Regional Disaster Management Coordinator, phone: +679 999 2509; 
email:
ysabeau.rycx@ifrc.org
Federation Asia Pacific zone office, Kuala Lumpur: 
x Daniel Bolanos, Operations Coordinator, 
Phone: +60 3 9207 5728, mobile: +601 2283 7305, email: 
daniel.bolanos@ifrc.org
x  Alan Bradbury, resource mobilization and PMER coordinator, 
Phone: +603 9207 5775, email: 
alan.bradbury@ifrc.org
Please send all pledges of funding to 
zonerm.asiapacific@ifrc.org
x Patrick Fuller, zone communications manager 
Phone: +6012 230 8451, email: 
patrick.fuller@ifrc.org
x Jeremy Francis, regional logistics coordinator, 
Phone: +6012 298 9752, fax: +60 3 2168 8573, email: 
jeremy.francis@ifrc.
<
Click here to return to the title page
>
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/387906
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu: Tropical cyclone Vania DREF operation n°
MDRVU001
 
  Original published date:    06 Feb 2011   
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Coordination, Food and Nutrition, Shelter and Non-Food Items, Water Sanitation Hygiene   
Content format:  Situation Report
  Language:    English   
  Source:    IFRC   
  Disaster type:    Tropical Cyclone, Tropical Cyclone   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent (IFRC) Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) is a source of
un-earmarked money created by the Federation in 1985 to ensure that immediate financial support is available for Red Cross
and Red Crescent emergency response. The DREF is a vital part of the International Federation's disaster response system
and increases the ability of National Societies to respond to disasters. 
CHF 90,322 has been allocated from the IFRC's Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) to support the Vanuatu Red Cross
Society (VRCS) in delivering immediate assistance to some 2,500 families (some 14,035 beneficiaries) for three months.
Un-earmarked funds to repay DREF are encouraged. 
Summary: In a period of two weeks, Vanuatu has been affected by two successive tropical cyclones: Tropical Cyclone (TC)
Vania and Tropical Cyclone Yasi. Between 12 and 15 January, the meteorological service (MET) station at Tanna airport
recorded 282mm of rainfall and measured winds from 15 to 25 knots. Tanna airport is on the west coast of Tanna and is,
therefore, protected from the worst winds, which were estimated to gust in excess of 55 knots, according to information
received through consultation with the Tanna MET office. 
The weather system associated with TC Vania was large and very slow-moving affecting the Tafea region for up to three
days. TC Vania passed between Erromango and Tanna as a category 1 tropical cyclone, before backtracking to the west and
heading south towards Noumea, strengthening to category 2. 
Initial reports mention widespread damage to fruit, root and cash crops which will cause serious food and income shortages
expected to vary for up to three to seven months due to pre-existing local conditions. In addition to food shortages, there are
serious concerns of poor water, sanitation and hygiene conditions with cyclone damage to water system infrastructure as well
as widespread pre-existing gastro- and respiratory health issues with limited access to medical treatment. Damage to
traditional grass-houses, particularly roofing is also widespread, with some localities sustaining particularly heavy
destruction. On 30 January, TC Yasi passed through the Banks Island group in Torba province in Vanuatu, creating even
further damage. 
The total population estimated affected is 32,540 people. The Vanuatu Red Cross Society (VRCS) is preparing to support
2,500 households (14,035 beneficiaries) in Tafea province through the distribution of relief supplies such as water storage
containers, water purification tablets, soap and mosquito nets. The operational budget supported under this DREF also takes
into account the high costs of travel and transportation in the Pacific region. 
This operation is expected to be implemented over three months, and will therefore be completed by 30 April 2011. A final
report will be made available by 31 July 2011, three months after the end of the operation.
 
06 Feb 2011
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Vanuatu:
Tropical cyclone Vania 
DREF operation n° MDRVU001
GLIDE n° 
TC-2011-000009-VUT 
TC-2011-000015-VUT 
6 February 2011 
The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent (IFRC) Disaster Relief Emergency Fund 
(DREF) is a source of un-earmarked money created by the Federation in 1985 to ensure that immediate 
financial support is available for Red Cross and Red Crescent emergency response. The DREF is a vital 
part of the International Federation’s disaster response system and increases the ability of National 
Societies to respond to disasters.  
CHF 90,322 has been allocated from the IFRC’s Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) to 
support the Vanuatu Red Cross Society (VRCS) in delivering immediate assistance to some 2,500 
families (some 14,035 beneficiaries) for three months. Un-earmarked funds to repay DREF are 
encouraged. 
Summary: In a period of two weeks, 
Vanuatu has been affected by two 
successive tropical cyclones: Tropical 
Cyclone (TC) Vania and Tropical 
Cyclone Yasi. Between 12 and 15 
January, the meteorological service 
(MET) station at Tanna airport recorded 
282mm of rainfall and measured winds 
from 15 to 25 knots. Tanna airport is on 
the west coast of Tanna and is, 
therefore, protected from the worst 
winds, which were estimated to gust in 
excess of 55 knots, according to 
information received through 
consultation with the Tanna MET office.  
The weather system associated with TC 
Vania was large and very slow-moving 
affecting the Tafea region for up to three 
days. TC Vania passed between 
Erromango and Tanna as a category 1 
tropical cyclone, before backtracking to 
the west and heading south towards 
Noumea, strengthening to category 2.  
Initial reports mention widespread damage to fruit, root and cash crops which will cause serious food and 
income shortages expected to vary for up to three to seven months due to pre-existing local conditions. In 
addition to food shortages, there are serious concerns of poor water, sanitation and hygiene conditions 
with cyclone damage to water system infrastructure as well as widespread pre-existing gastro- and 
respiratory health issues with limited access to medical treatment. Damage to traditional grass-houses
1
,
particularly roofing is also widespread, with some localities sustaining particularly heavy destruction. On 
30 January, TC Yasi passed through the Banks Island group in Torba province in Vanuatu, creating even 
1
 Traditional houses built from local materials such as bamboo, grass and thatch 
Traditional housing built mainly from thatch, bamboo and grass in 
Vanuatu has taken a severe beating from the tropical cyclones that 
have struck the country in the short space of two weeks. 
(Photo: Vanuatu Red Cross Society) 
Page 24/124
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2
Gardens in Tanna completely destroyed. 
(Photo: Vanuatu Red Cross Society)
further damage. 
The total population estimated affected is 32,540 people. The Vanuatu Red Cross Society (VRCS) is 
preparing to support 2,500 households (14,035 beneficiaries) in Tafea province through the distribution of 
relief supplies such as water storage containers, water purification tablets, soap and mosquito nets. The 
operational budget supported under this DREF also takes into account the high costs of travel and 
transportation in the Pacific region. 
This operation is expected to be implemented over three months, and will therefore be completed by 30 
April 2011. A final report will be made available by 31 July 2011, three months after the end of the 
operation. 
<click here for the DREF budget; contact details; or a map of the affected areas>
The situation 
In a period of two weeks, Vanuatu has 
been affected by two successive tropical 
cyclones. First, TC Vania, as a category 1, 
impacted Tafea province in southern 
Vanuatu as it moved between Erromango 
and Tanna islands. The prolonged winds 
and rains, causing considerable damage to 
several staple and cash crops, destroyed 
livelihoods, houses, water system 
infrastructure, schools, and roads.  
As a result, the government of Vanuatu and 
Vanuatu’s national disaster committee is 
coordinating a response to TC Vania which 
impacted Vanuatu’s southern island groups 
on 12-13 January 2011. The second 
cyclone, TC Yasi was declared on 30 
January 2011 and upgraded to a category 
2 on 31 January. On 30 January, TC Yasi 
passed through the Banks island group in 
Torba province in Vanuatu, bringing heavy 
rain, damaging winds and 3-4 metre-high 
storm surge waves. The Banks island group includes Gaua island, where the Gaua volcano displaced the 
total population of the western side of Gaua (404 people) in November 2009. 
Coordination and partnerships 
VRCS is coordinating closely with the Vanuatu government in deploying joint assessment teams and sharing 
information. The VRCS disaster management office (DMO) attends the national disaster coordination 
meetings and the VRCS secretary general is meeting regularly with government representatives to 
coordinate response activities at the national level, supported by French Red Cross, which  has a delegation 
in-country. IFRC is liaising directly with VRCS on the need for support and coordinating closely with partner 
national societies in the region to assist in mobilizing personnel and relief items. 
Further support to VRCS in undertaking the needs assessments and potential relief work is being provided 
by French Red Cross in Vanuatu, and IFRC through its global disaster management resources, including the 
regional office in Suva and Asia Pacific disaster management unit, located in Kuala Lumpur. 
Australian Red Cross is providing water and sanitation training at the request of the national society and is 
on standby to mobilize relief items, if needed for the operation. New Zealand Red Cross is also on standby 
on the possibility of deploying relief items for distribution. 
VRCS is also attending water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) coordination meetings to ensure a consistent 
response to addressing water and sanitation needs.   
Page 25/124
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3
Red Cross and Red Crescent action 
The VRCS disaster management office (DMO) has liaised with government officials to conduct the initial 
damage survey, and mobilized volunteers into assessment and relief teams. 
The representative from French Red Cross is supporting VRCS to identify their capacities and needs. The 
AP zone disaster management unit is in coordination with IFRC regional office in Suva and the partner 
national societies in the Pacific (including Australian Red Cross, French Red Cross, New Zealand Red Cross 
and the South Pacific Regional Intervention Platform - PIROPS) in order to identify the required support for 
the Vanuatu national society. IFRC’s Pacific regional office is also liaising with UN OCHA. 
To date, at the request of VRCS, French Red Cross has mobilized a water and sanitation specialist from 
PIROPS and is preparing to mobilize further relief items, pending the outcome of assessments. 
The current plan of action outlined by VRCS is to focus on immediate water and sanitation needs of the most 
vulnerable in Tafea in the period until existing water supplies can be rehabilitated, in coordination with 
UNICEF and the WASH cluster. In addition and if requested by the Vanuatu government, VRCS will assist in 
food distribution. 
The needs 
Many of those affected have experienced significant damage to their homes and household belongings. 
Main needs identified include food, water and hygiene needs. There has been minor damage reported to the 
communal water supply systems and increased levels of turbidity in the source water on the islands.  
The effect on water supplies varies across the islands due to the different water sources: shallow wells, 
surface water supply, streams, coastal spring waters and bore holes. There is a risk of water-borne and 
vector-borne diseases, especially from low-lying areas like Middle Bush in Tanna islands until water, 
sanitation and hygiene needs are addressed.
The proposed operation 
Water, sanitation and hygiene promotion 
Outcome: The risk of water-related diseases has been reduced through the provision of safe water and 
hygiene items to 2,500 households in Tafea province for three months.
Outputs and activities planned:  
x  Conduct assessment on water and sanitation needs  
x  Conduct emergency training for volunteers in Tafea on the use of water purification tablets and basic 
hygiene awareness, as determined by the assessment 
x  Print information material related to the use of chlorine tablets for distribution  
x  Procure and distribute jerry cans with water purification tablets and soap for emergency household 
water treatment, safe storage and hygiene until pre-existing water supplies can be rehabilitated, using 
trained volunteers and in coordination with the WASH cluster  
x  Distribute mosquito nets in Erromango 
x  Support the emergency rehabilitation of damaged water supply sources such as cleaning wells and 
emergency repairs. 
x  Monitor and evaluate the distributions and effective use of chlorine tablets by target households   
 Relief distributions (basic food and non-food items) 
Outcome:  The essential household needs of 2,500 households are met within three months in Tafea 
province through the distribution of food and non food-items (i.e. mosquito nets and hygiene kits), as 
determined by the assessment findings
Page 26/124
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4
Outputs and activities planned:  
x  Support ongoing needs and capacity assessments 
x  Train volunteers on distribution procedures 
x  Develop beneficiary targeting strategy and registration system to deliver intended assistance. 
x  Distribute relief supplies and control supply movements from point of dispatch to end-user. 
x  Replenish pre-positioned relief stocks 
x  Provide essential volunteer resources to support the Vanuatu NDMO in the distribution of food 
x  Monitor and evaluate the relief activities and provide reporting on relief distributions
How we work 
All IFRC assistance seeks to adhere to the
 Code of Conduct for the International Red Cross and 
Red Crescent Movement and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in Disaster Relief
and the 
Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response (Sphere)
 in delivering 
assistance to the most vulnerable. 
The IFRC’s vision is to inspire, encourage, 
facilitate and promote at all times all forms of 
humanitarian activities by National Societies, with 
a view to preventing and alleviating human 
suffering, and thereby contributing to the 
maintenance and promotion of human dignity and 
peace in the world.   
The IFRC’s work is guided by 
Strategy 2020
 which 
puts forward three strategic aims: 
1.  Save lives, protect livelihoods, and strengthen 
recovery from disaster and crises. 
2.  Enable healthy and safe living. 
3.  Promote social inclusion and a culture of non-
violence and peace.  
Contact information
For further information specifically related to this operation please contact:  
x  Vanuatu Red Cross National Society: 
o  Jacqueline de Gaillande Secretary General, phone:+ 678 27258, 
 email: 
redcross@vanuatu.com.vu
x  Federation Pacific regional office, Suva: 
o  Aurelia Balpe, head of regional office,  
phone: +679 331 1855; email: 
aurelia.balpe@ifrc.org
o  Ysabeau Rycx, regional disaster management coordinator,  
phone: +679 999 2509; email: 
ysabeau.rycx@ifrc.org
x  Federation Asia Pacific zone office, Kuala Lumpur: 
o  Daniel Bolaños, operations coordinator, 
phone: +60 3 9207 5728, mobile: +601 2287 7305, email: 
daniel.bolanos@ifrc.org
o  Alan Bradbury, head of resource mobilization and PMER, 
phone: +603 9207 5775, email: 
alan.bradbury@ifrc.org
Please send all pledges of funding to 
zonerm.asiapacific@ifrc.org
o  Patrick Fuller, zone communications manager 
phone: +6012 230 8451, email: 
patrick.fuller@ifrc.org
o  Jeremy Francis, regional logistics coordinator, 
phone: +6012 298 9752, fax: +60 3 2168 8573, email: 
jeremy.francis@ifrc.org
<DREF budget and map below; click here to return to the title page>
Page 27/124
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MDRVU001 Vanuatu : Tropical Cyclone Vania
06-02-11
DREF BUDGET SUMMARY
TOTAL BUDGET CHF
3,529
5,058
19,740
Other Supplies & Services & Cash Disbursement
2,468
30,794
790
494
1,283
7,437
22,440
29,877
National Staff
54
1,974
2,028
5,004
5,004
12,752
987
2,083
15,822
5,513
5,513
90,322
Water & Sanitation
Utensils & Tools
Total Supplies
Budget Group
Clothing & Textiles
Computer & Telecom
Office/Household Furniture & Equipment
Total Land, vehicles & equipment
Distribution & Monitoring
Transport & Vehicle Costs
Total Transport & Storage
Total Personnel
National Society Staff
Workshops & Training
Total Workshops & Training
Travel
Information & Public Relations
Communications
Total General Expenditure
Programme Support
Total Programme Support
TOTAL BUDGET
Page 28/124
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!
\
!
\
Ï Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
PORT VILA
LUGANVILLE
New Caledonia
New Caledonia
Vanuatu
Vanuatu
Solomon Islands
Solomon Islands
The maps  used do not  imply t he express ion of any opinion on  the  part of  the  Int ernat ional  Federation of the Red  Cross  and Red  Crescent Soc ieties or National Societies concerning the
 legal  status of  a  territory or  of  its  authorities.  Map data sources:  ESRI,  DEVINFO , UNI SYS,  International Federation- MDRVN008. mxd
Vanuatu: Tropical cyclones
MDRVU001
3 February 2011
TC-2011-000009-VUT
TC-2011-000015-VUT
I
Classification
Ï
CYCLONE -4
Ï
CYCLONE -3
Ï
CYCLONE -2
Ï
CYCLONE -1
Ï
TROPICAL S TORM
Ï
TROPICAL DE PRESS ION
Vania
Yasi
0
250
125
km
Page 29/124
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/382729
 
Vanuatu: Tropical Cyclone Yasi Situation Update #3, 03 February 2011
Original published date:  03 Feb 2011
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs   
Disaster type:  Tropical Cyclone
  Origin notes:       
  
  
I. HIGHLIGHTS/KEY PRIORITIES 
- Tropical Cyclone (TC) Yasi crossed the Australian mainland at midnight local time on 2 February as a Category 5 storm. 
- Despite its strength and the level of destruction there are no reports of serious injuries or fatalities. 
- The TC has been downgraded to a category two strength cyclone and continues to weaken. 
- There are minimal reports of damage from Papua New Guinea's Milne Bay Province.
 
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
03 Feb 2011
Page 30/124
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The mission of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) is to mobilize and coordinate effective and 
principled humanitarian action in partnership with national and international actors. 
 
OC  
  South West Pacific 
• 
Tropical Cyclone Yasi 
 
   
Situation Report No. 3 
   3 February 2011 
 
 
This report was issued by the Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific with input from the OCHA SRO in Fiji and 
the Humanitarian Support Unit in PNG. It covers the period from 2 February to 3 February 2011. This is the last 
Situation Report for Cyclone Yasi, unless unforeseen developments occur. 
 
 
 
Tropical  Cyclone Yasi  crossed  the  north 
Queensland  coast,  south  of  Cairns, Australia 
at  about  midnight  local  time.  Despite  its 
category  5  strength – the  highest  level  in  the 
storm  classification  system  there  are  no 
reported  casualties.  Small  communities  bore 
the brunt of winds up to 290km/h (180mph) as 
the storm swept inland slowly weakening.  
 
Media  reports  indicate  that  the  strong  winds 
caused  severe  damage  to  infrastructure  as 
roofs were  torn  from  houses  and  branches 
ripped  from  trees.  The  heavy winds  downed 
power  lines  and  thousands  of  residents  are 
without  electricity.  About  30,000  people 
evacuated to cyclone shelters.  
 
The  Bureau  of  Meteorology  said  a  storm 
surge of two meters above the normal level of 
the  tide  had  inundated  one  stretch  of  coast 
but the high tide was not as severe as feared. 
 
Cyclone Yasi  was  later  downgraded  to  a 
category 2 on the morning of 3 February as it 
moved 
inland 
towards 
north-west 
Queensland.  The Australian  Bureau  of 
Meteorology  still  classified  its  core  as 
dangerous. 
 
 
 
The eye of  the  storm  was  reported  to  be 
35km  (22  miles)  in  width, with  a  front 
stretching  across  650km  (400  miles).  The 
core  of  the  cyclone  took  four  hours  to  pass 
overhead. 
 
 
Papua New Guinea 
Early  in  the evening  on  the  2  January,  the  tropical  cyclone warning  for  coastal  and  island 
communities  in  Milne  Bay,  a  province  of  Papua  New  Guinea  was  withdrawn.  The  province  has  a 
population  of  210,000  people.  The  Milne  Bay  Disaster  Office  reported  that  Alotau experienced 
heavy winds and rains for a few hours, with no reports of casualties or injuries in Alotau. The Milne 
 
I. HIGHLIGHTS/KEY PRIORITIES 
 
•  Tropical Cyclone (TC) Yasi crossed the Australian mainland at midnight local time on 2 
February as a Category 5 storm. 
•  Despite its strength and the level of destruction there are no reports of serious injuries or 
fatalities. 
•  The TC has been downgraded to a category two strength cyclone and continues to 
weaken. 
•  There are minimal reports of damage from Papua New Guinea’s Milne Bay Province.  
 
II. Situation Overview 
Page 31/124
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The mission of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) is to mobilize and coordinate effective 
and principled humanitarian action in partnership with national and international actors. 
 
 
 
 
2
Bay Disaster Office has surveyed the area around Alotau, and has been in contact with the outer 
islands by radio. There are no reports of casualties or injuries. Crops such as bananas and sugar 
canes  in  Alotau  and  on  the  islands  have  been  damaged,  as well  as  the  roofs  of  some  thatch 
houses. The provincial disaster office also assisted a small passenger boat with 13 passengers that 
were  at  sea  at  the  time  of  the  storm.    Although  the  power  supply was  interrupted  in  Alotau 
yesterday, it is now back to normal, as is the water supply. Health services, schools and all private 
and  public  services  are  operating  as  normal  today.  The  provincial  disaster  office will  continue  to 
assess  the  damage  to  crops  and  houses,  but  said  that  assistance will  not  be  needed  from  the 
humanitarian community.  
 
Solomon Islands 
The  Solomon  Islands  National  Disaster  Management Office  (NDMO)  reports that  the  aftermath  of 
cyclone Yasi  has  been  minimal. There  are  some  reports  of  damages to food gardens  because of 
flooding and disruption of due to bridges being cut-off as the result of river flooding. No assistance 
is requested. 
 
 
Sub Regional Office for the Pacific 
Fiji: Allanah Kjellgren, Public Information Officer, OCHA 
media@ochapacific.org, +679 8385305 
 
Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific 
Kirsten Mildren, Regional Public Information Officer, OCHA 
mildren@un.org
, +66 81915 1276  
 
For more information, please visit 
www.met.gov.fj
 or 
www.bom.gov.au
 for cyclone tracking
 
III. Contact 
Page 32/124
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/382622
 
Vanuatu: Tropical Cyclone Yasi Situation Update #2, 02 February 2011
Original published date:  02 Feb 2011
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Agriculture, Coordination, Food and Nutrition, Shelter and Non-Food Items   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source:  UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
  Disaster type:    Tropical Cyclone   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
I. HIGHLIGHTS/KEY PRIORITIES 
- Tropical Cyclone (TC) Yasi has been upgraded to a category five strength cyclone and is expected to make landfall in
Australia at 1200 UTC on Wednesday 2 February. 
- A tropical cyclone watch has also been issued for the Milne Islands off Papua New Guinea. 
- TC Yasi passed through the Banks Islands in Torba Province in Vanuatu on the 30 January bringing with it destructive
winds, dangerous storm surge and heavy rains that resulted in minor damage to buildings and crops. 
- On the 31 January it passed south of the Solomon Islands causing minor damage.
 
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
02 Feb 2011
Page 33/124
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The mission of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) is to mobilize and coordinate effective and 
principled humanitarian action in partnership with national and international actors. 
 
OC  
  South West Pacific 
• 
Tropical Cyclone Yasi 
 
   
Situation Report No. 2 
   2 February 2011 
 
 
This report was issued by the OCHA SRO in Fiji with input from the Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific and 
the Humanitarian Support Unit in PNG. It covers the period from 31 January to 2 February 2011.  
 
 
 
After moving though Vanuatu and the 
Solomon Islands as a Category 1 and 2 
respectively, Tropical Cyclone (TC) Yasi has 
been upgraded to Category 5 strength – the 
highest level in the storm classification 
system. TC Yasi is expected to hit south of 
Cairns in north-east Queensland, Australia at 
midnight local time on 2 February.  
 
The Australian Bureau of Meteorology is 
warning that “Severe TC Yasi is a large and 
very powerful tropical cyclone and poses an 
extremely serious threat to life and property. 
This impact is likely to be more life 
threatening than any experienced during 
recent generations.” Warnings have been 
issued to communities to evacuate low-lying 
areas as extremely dangerous storm surge is 
expected with damaging waves, strong 
currents and flooding of low-lying areas 
extending some way inland, as the cyclone is 
predicted to cross the Australian coast at high 
tide.  
 
Since the cyclone was declared on the 30 
January it has continued to intensify and wind 
speeds of 300 km/h have been recorded. On 
the 30 January it passed the Banks Island 
group in Torba Province bringing heavy rains 
and 3 – 4 meter storm surge waves. It then 
intensified to a Category 2 cyclone and 
passed the Solomon Islands on the 31 
January.  
The Australian Bureau is predicting that due 
to the size and severity of the cyclone, the 
system will likely persist as a TC even after 
making landfall in Australia.  
 
 
 
I. HIGHLIGHTS/KEY PRIORITIES 
 
• Tropical 
Cyclone 
(TC) 
Yasi has been upgraded to a category five strength cyclone and is 
expected to make landfall in Australia at 1200 UTC on Wednesday 2 February. 
•  A tropical cyclone watch has also been issued for the Milne Islands off Papua New 
Guinea. 
• TC 
Yasi passed through the Banks Islands in Torba Province in Vanuatu on the 30 
January bringing with it destructive winds, dangerous storm surge and heavy rains that 
resulted in minor damage to buildings and crops. 
•  On the 31 January it passed south of the Solomon Islands causing minor damage. 
 
II. Situation Overview 
Page 34/124
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The mission of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) is to mobilize and coordinate effective 
and principled humanitarian action in partnership with national and international actors. 
 
 
 
 
2
Vanuatu  
TC  Yasi passed between the Banks and Torres Islands groups in the northern Torba province of 
Vanuatu at around 1300 UTC 30 January 2011 (midnight local time in Vanuatu). The Banks Island 
group in Vanuatu’s northern province of Torba (population 9,359) consists of 13 islands, the most 
populous being Vanua Lava (2,597), Gaua (2,491) and Motalava (1,451). The Government of 
Vanuatu has not declared an emergency in relation to TC Yasi.  
The Vanuatu Red Cross has reported that food sources are affected as almost all root crops and 
fruit trees were destroyed in most of the communities in the Torres and Banks Island groups. Water 
tanks which are the islands main source of water have reportedly been contaminated by debris. 
Local authorities are promoting boiling water as a safety measure.  
 
On islands in the Torres group, the Vanuatu Red Cross is reporting that 60 dwellings (47 sleeping 
houses and 13 kitchen houses), 3 classrooms and a community hall have been destroyed. Food 
gardens and fruit trees are all reported to have destroyed across the islands in the group.  
 
For the Banks group, no major damages were sustained on the island of Gaua, and on Motalava 
Island two houses have been destroyed along with most root crops and fruit trees.    
 
Solomon Islands 
On 31 January, TC Yasi (as a category 3) moved west over open ocean along the south of 
Solomon Islands. In response, the Solomon Islands National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) 
stood up the National Emergency Operations Centre to monitor TC Yasi’s progress. The NDMO 
has been in contact with all provinces at risk (Temotu, Rennell & Bellona, Guadalcanal, Makira and 
Malaita); all provinces reported strong winds, heavy rain and high seas, but no significant damage.  
 
Papua New Guinea 
A tropical cyclone warning is still current for coastal and island communities in Milne Bay, a 
province of Papua New Guinea with a population of 210,000 people. Authorities are advising 
residents to seek higher ground until the threat passes. The authorities are warning that flooding is 
likely to occur in the western and eastern Milne Bay Islands between Russel Island and Alotau 
town.  
 
 
For the Pacific Islands, the National Disaster Management Offices in both Port Vila, Vanuatu and 
Honiara, Solomon Islands continue to monitor the impacts of TC Yasi on affected islands through 
their respective provincial authorities, local Red Cross societies and other in-country partners.  
 
OCHA SRO Fiji is in contact with the National Disaster Management Offices in both Honiara 
(Solomon Islands) and Port Vila (Vanuatu) as assessments following TC Yasi progress.  
 
 
Sub Regional Office for the Pacific 
Fiji: Allanah Kjellgren, Public Information Officer, OCHA 
media@ochapacific.org, +679 8385305 
 
Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific 
Kirsten Mildren, Regional Public Information Officer, OCHA 
mildren@un.org
, +66 81915 1276  
 
For more information, please visit 
www.met.gov.fj
 or 
www.bom.gov.au
 for cyclone tracking
 
IV. Coordination 
VI. Contact 
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Vanuatu: Tropical Cyclone Yasi Situation Update #1, 31 January 2011
Original published date:  31 Jan 2011
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Agriculture, Recovery and Reconstruction   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source:  UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
  Disaster type:    Tropical Cyclone   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
This report was issued by OCHA SRO Fiji. It covers the period from 30 January 2011 to 31 January 2011. 
- TC Yasi was declared on 30 January 2011, and upgraded to a Category 2 cyclone on 31 January. 
- On 30 January, TC Yasi passed through the Banks Island group in TORBA province in Vanuatu, bringing heavy rain,
damaging winds and 3-4m storm surge waves. The Banks group includes Gaua Island, where the Gaua volcano displaced the
total population of the western side of Gaua (404 people) in November 2009. 
- Initial reports from Vanuatu Red Cross indicate some minor damage to dwellings and crops. 
- TC Yasi is predicted to intensify to at least a Category 3 and make landfall near Townsville in Queensland, Australia within
the next 72 hours.
 
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
31 Jan 2011
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The mission of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) is to mobilize and coordinate effective and 
principled humanitarian action in partnership with national and international actors. 
 
  Tropical Cyclone Yasi 
 
  
Situation Update #1 
  31 January 2011
 
This report was issued by OCHA SRO Fiji. It covers the period from 30 January 2011 to 31 January 2011.  
TC Yasi was declared on 30 January 2011, and upgraded to a Category 2 cyclone on 31 
January.  
On 30 January, TC Yasi passed through the Banks Island group in TORBA province in Vanuatu, 
bringing heavy rain, damaging winds and 3-4m storm surge waves. The Banks group includes Gaua 
Island, where the Gaua volcano displaced the total population of the western side of Gaua (404 
people) in November 2009. 
Initial reports from Vanuatu Red Cross indicate some minor damage to dwellings and crops. 
TC Yasi is predicted to intensify to at least a Category 3 and make landfall near Townsville in 
Queensland, Australia within the next 72 hours.  
 
Tropical Cyclone Warning
 Number 90 issued 0123 UTC Monday 31 January 2011 
 
 
Source: 
RSMC 
Nadi 
        
Situation Overview  
According to RSMC Nadi Meteorology Service, Tropical Cyclone Yasi, a Category 2, was located near 13.6S 
164.2E at midnight UTC 31 January 2011 (11am, 31 January 2011 local time); or approximately 240 nautical 
miles southeast of Rennell Island, Solomon Islands.  
 
TC Yasi passed between the Banks and Torres Islands groups in the northern TORBA province of Vanuatu at 
around 1300 UTC 30 January 2011 (midnight local time). The Banks Island group in Vanuatu’s northern 
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The mission of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) is to mobilize and coordinate effective 
and principled humanitarian action in partnership with national and international actors. 
 
 
 
 
2
province of TORBA (pop 9359) consists of 13 islands
1
, the most populous being Vanua Lava (2597), Gaua 
(2491) and Moto Lava (1451).  
 
All flights to TORBA province have been cancelled.  
 
The Vanuatu Red Cross has reported that food sources are affected with food gardens and fruit trees on Mota 
Lava Island been significantly or totally damaged, but water sources appear to be safe. Initial reports also 
indicated five houses have been destroyed on Mota Lava, though conditions are still preventing a detailed 
assessment of the islands.  
 
Similar reports have been received on the status of Vanua Lava and Gaua.  
 
While assessments are continuing, the Government of Vanuatu has not declared an emergency in relation to 
TC Yasi. Vanuatu’s National Disaster Committee met today to discuss a response to TC Vania which 
impacted Vanuatu’s southern island groups from 12-13 January 2011. An earlier planned assessment mission 
to Gaua for return of 404 villagers displaced by the active Gaua volcano was postponed this month due to TC 
Vania.  
TC Yasi is heading west at 14 knots, and is predicted to intensify to a Category 3 in the next 18 hours. 
Warnings have been issued to national authorities in both Vanuatu and Solomon Islands to expect sustained 
winds of 55 knots close to the centre (increasing to 85 knots in the next 24 hours), rough seas with increasing 
swells and coastal flooding. For Solomon Islands, a cyclone warning is now current for Temotu, Rennell & 
Bellona, and Makira and Guadalcanal provinces. 
 
OCHA SRO Fiji is in contact with the National Disaster Management Offices in both Honiara (Solomon 
Islands) and Port Vila (Vanuatu) as TC Yasi progresses.  
 
 
Source: Department of Land, Survey and Registry, Vanuatu. 
                                                
1
 The other islands (population in brackets): Rah (189), Awakei (26), Loh (210), Merelava (647), Merig (12), Metoma 
(13), Mota (683) Ureparapara (437), Hiu (269) Tegua (58), Toga (276).  
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ReliefWeb report — 
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Vanuatu: Vanuatu Volcanic Activity Situation Report 1
Original published date:  14 Dec 2009
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Coordination, Food and Nutrition, Shelter and Non-Food Items   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source:  World Health Organization
  Disaster type:    Volcano   
  Origin notes:    http://www.wpro.who.int/sites/eha/disasters/2009/van_volc_activity/Vanuatu_Volcano_sitrep1_14122009.htm   
  
  
GENERAL INFORMATION 
An increase in activity at Mt Garet, an active volcano on Gaua Island, Torba Province, Vanuatu forced the evacuation of over
300 people from three villages on the west coast of Gaua on 26 November 2009. The National Disaster Management Office
(NDMO) has maintained alert level 2 on the island, requiring evacuation of all residents living near the volcano's lava path. 
HEALTH IMPACT 
Although current conditions are projected to have only minor health effects, further assessment is being conducted to
determine the potential impact of the steam and ash emissions from the volcano. The risk of mudflows remains high,
especially in the Waterfall area east of Mt Garet. 
The most immediate health needs identified include access to clean water, good sanitation, and adequate shelter. 
Casualties 
No casualties have been reported as of 14 December 2009 
RESPONSE 
Government Response 
The decision to evacuate people from the western side of the island was taken on 26 November 2009. As of 4 December,
nearly 400 people were evacuated from the villages on the western side of the island. The NDMO estimates that evacuees
will remain in host communities for 3-4 months. 
Plans are in place to evacuate an estimated 200 people living in the mudflow-prone Waterfall area to safer ground and, if
necessary (only in case of alert at phase 3) the totality of the population (estimated to around 2,600 people) to Vanua Lava
Island. 
As of 14 December, there are sufficient health supplies on Gaua to cater to the needs of the entire island's population. 
International Response 
International partners and concerned governments are assisting in the continued monitoring of volcanic activity and with
providing and transporting food and other supplies to the island. Concerned governments have transportation assets on
standby should the need for a mass evacuation arise. 
United Nations (UN) partner agencies are conducting interagency coordination meetings, with the last meeting held in Port
Vila on 4 December 2009. 
WHO Response 
The WHO is in close communication with the Vanuatu Government and international partners to coordinate the provision of
necessary supplies and technical support. 
Sources 
OCHA Situation Update 2. Gaua Island Volcanic Activity, Vanuatu, 8 December 2009 
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United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UN-OCHA) Pacific - Minutes of the Inter Agency
Coordination Meeting on Gaua Island Volcano Situation, 4 December 2009, Port Vila 
For further information please contact: 
WHO Vanuatu
Dr Bernard Fabre-Teste
WHO Country Liaison Officer
Tel: (678) 27 683
HP: (678) 55 47 683
Email: fabretesteb@wpro.who.int 
WHO South Pacific
Mr Steven Iddings
Environmental Engineer
Tel : (679) 323 4100
Fax: (679) 323 4166
Email: iddingss@wpro.who.int 
WHO Regional Office
Dr Arturo Pesigan
Tel: (632) 528 9810
Fax: (632) 528 9072
Email: pesigana@wpro.who.int
 
14 Dec 2009
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ReliefWeb report — 
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Vanuatu: OCHA Situation Update No. 1 on Gaua Island Volcanic
Activity, Vanuatu
 
  Original published date:    27 Nov 2009   
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
Language: English
  Source:    UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs   
  Disaster type:    Volcano   
  Origin notes:    http://www.pacificdisaster.net/pdnadmin/data/documents/3654.html   
  
  
1. Summary of the Situation 
Gaua volcano on Gaua Island, TORBA Province, Vanuatu, has erupted on 18 November 2009. This explosion has been
followed by very thick and high emissions of ash columns that were covering the areas exposed to trade winds in the West.
Until present, the activity of Gaua volcano remains significant according to the Geo-Hazard Section, Department of Geology,
Mines and Water Resources. It is recommended that the alert level of the volcano be maintained at level 2 while close
monitoring of the volcanic activities is on-going. The probability of the volcanic activity going up to level 3 is low to
moderate. Level 2 requires on- island evacuation mainly from the West to the East while Level 3 requires evacuation of the
whole island population, which is estimated to be 3,000. 
The danger persists almost on the entire island except the South-Western part. The North- Western part of the island is
particularly at risk of ash fall and volcanic degassing while the eastern part is prone to lahar flow, especially along the area of
Waterfall which is a lahar flow path. An area of at least 1 kilometre surrounding the river is highly prone to mudflow. The
areas further away from the river of Waterfalls are also threatened with mudflow hazard in case of a highly explosive
eruption, at least 6 kilometres north and south from the Waterfall River, which covers from Losalava to Makeliu Village.
(Refer to the Gaua Hazard Map November 2009 P5 of Bulletin No 3, Gaua Volcano activity Gaua Island, 24 November
2009, Department of Geology, Mines and Water Resources).
 
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
27 Nov 2009
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i
NATIONS UNIES 
BUREAU DE LA COORDINATION 
DES AFFAIRES HUMANITAIRES
UNITED NATIONS 
OFFICE FOR THE COORDINATION 
OF HUMANITARIAN AFFAIRS 
OCHA – Pacific
5
th
 Floor, Kadavu House, 414 Victoria Parade 
Postal Address: C/o UNDP, Private Mail Bag, Suva, FIJI ISLANDS 
Phone:  +679 331 6760/ 331 6761 
Fax:  +679 330 9762 
ocha.fj@undp.org
OCHA Situation Update No 1. on Gaua Island Volcanic Activity, Vanuatu 
27 November 2009 
1.  Summary of the Situation 
Gaua volcano on Gaua Island, TORBA Province, Vanuatu, has erupted on 18 November 2009. 
This explosion has been followed by very thick and high emissions of ash columns that were 
covering the areas exposed to trade winds in the West. Until present, the activity of Gaua 
volcano remains significant according to the Geo-Hazard Section, Department of Geology, 
Mines and Water Resources. It is recommended that the alert level of the volcano be 
maintained at level 2 while close monitoring of the volcanic activities is on-going. The 
probability of the volcanic activity going up to level 3 is low to moderate. Level 2 requires on-
island evacuation mainly from the West to the East while Level 3 requires evacuation of the 
whole island population, which is estimated to be 3,000.
The danger persists almost on the entire island except the South-Western part. The North-
Western part of the island is particularly at risk of ash fall and volcanic degassing while the 
eastern part is prone to lahar flow, especially along the area of Waterfall which is a lahar flow 
path. An area of at least 1 kilometre surrounding the river is highly prone to mudflow. The 
areas further away from the river of Waterfalls are also threatened with mudflow hazard in 
case of a highly explosive eruption, at least 6 kilometres north and south from the Waterfall 
River, which covers from Losalava to Makeliu Village. (Refer to the Gaua Hazard Map 
November 2009 P5 of Bulletin No3, Gaua Volcano activity Gaua Island, 24 November 2009, 
Department of Geology, Mines and Water Resources).
There are 3 phases of Operations activated by NDC: 
•   Phase 1 - Monitoring and information dissemination/Awareness and Planning 
•   Phase 2 - Evacuating of Western communities to the Eastern part of the 
island/awareness
•   Phase 3 - Evacuation of the whole island population to Vanua Lava Island 
In-land Evacuation 
On 26 November 2009, the evacuation of people living in the risk areas in the Western part of 
the island has started, prioritizing vulnerable groups. Currently there are 3 boats available to 
transfer the people.  Lack of fuel for the boat was identified as a logistical constraint, but it was 
clarified that the government (NDMO) will be able to cover the needs. In total, 31 people have 
been evacuated including 2 new born babies on 26 November. According to the Red Cross, 
the evacuation is taking place slowly due to limited sea transport means and rough seas. 
Those living in the risk areas of Western side, approximately 350-400 population in total, are 
going to be evacuated in the coming week, with daily evacuations. The TORBA Provincial 
government, police and Vanuatu Red Cross are conducting the registration of evacuees. So 
far, all evacuees are accommodated with relatives on the eastern side of the island, but the 
government is already planning for setting up evacuation centers, and Namasari is considered 
as one of the locations. The field operation team already has some evacuation plan (who goes 
to which villages), but it still to be confirmed how many people need to be accommodated at 
evacuation centers, what facilities are going to be used, and what 
equipment/resources/facilities have to be available at the evacuation centres.  In addition to 
these 350-400 population in the West who need to be evacuated to the East, there are an 
additional 200 people living along the area of Waterfall on the eastern side of the island, which 
is prone to the lahar or mudflows. They also need to be evacuated since if a serious volcanic 
eruption occurs causing drain off of the lahar, the impact will be fatal. Therefore, in total around 
600 people need to be evacuated from their current residence to safer locations on the island. 
It is assumed that it will take 5-10 days to evacuate all 600 people to these locations. In 
addition to the currently available 3 boats, the government is looking for other ships/boats for 
transportation. A French Naval ship will depart on 30 November to Port Vila for a routine 
exercise from Noumea (New Caledonia), and the Vanuatu government requested France for 
logistical assistance with the evacuation.
Phase 3 Contingency planning
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 iii
3.  Actions taken by the government 
  Deployment of police team (4 Police/Vanuatu Mobile Force officers) to support the field 
operation and information gathering. They aim to establish additional communications, a 
link with Torba Provincial Government/Santo police/National level and an Emergency 
Operations Centre.
•   Deployment of a Geo-hazard team to monitor the volcanic situation 
•   NDMO supports the Torba Provincial Disaster Committee to assess and arrange 
evacuation centers in the eastern part of the island 
•   The government field team to organize and monitor the evacuation process including the 
registration of evacuees 
•   Regular NDC meeting for information sharing with the key stakeholders 
•   Conducting awareness raising on volcanic situations, its threats and actions to be taken 
4.  Actions taken by the non-government agencies 
•   Vanuatu Red Cross dispatched the assessment team 
  The Vanuatu Red Cross provides support for the registration of evacuees and distribution 
of relief items. It has mobilized prepositioned relief items in Sola on Vanua Lava Island, 
approximately 60 km from Gaua, which includes 42 water containers (20 ltr) and 77 
tarpaulins.
•   French Red Cross in New Caledonia provided extra relief items, which are arriving in 
Vanuatu with a French Naval. These include 300 tarpaulins, 150 hygiene kits and 300 
water containers.
  Donor agencies and UN agencies are on stand-by to provide support upon request of the 
government.
A Pacific Humanitarian Team (PHT) lead agency meeting was held in Suva, linked up with 
Vanuatu based agencies and government to review the current situation and discuss 
possible support that the PHT can provide.
•  
OCHA deployed a staff for providing coordination support in Vanuatu 
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ReliefWeb report — 
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Vanuatu: Vanuatu Earthquake Situation Report 1
Original published date:  05 Jun 2009
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Health, Recovery and Reconstruction, Water Sanitation Hygiene   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source:  World Health Organization
  Disaster type:    Earthquake   
  Origin notes:    http://www.wpro.who.int/sites/eha/disasters/2009/van_earthquake/van_earthquake_05062009.htm   
  
  
GENERAL INFORMATION 
A 5.7 magnitude earthquake hit the Island of Tongoa on 29 May 2009, at 6:20pm. The quake was centred 75km west of Port
Vila and had a depth of 29.8 miles. Although the epicentre of the quake was on Emae, the island of Tongoa, with an
estimated population of 3 000 to 5 000, was most affected, particularly the coast of Akomae, in South East Tongoa to the
South West part. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center reported that there was no threat of tsunami. Ten to twelve small
tremors have been recorded so far. 
Damage to Infrastructure 
The earthquake damaged buildings included provincial government offices, schools, houses, health, and religious
infrastructures. Seventy five per cent of cemented ground wells were broken posing a threat to safe water supply. There were
landslides in the most affected areas. A few buildings collapsed. Gardens were damaged which might limit local food supply.
Damaged roads might affect assessment and distribution of aid and supplies. 
HEALTH IMPACT 
Casualties 
As of 5 June, there were no deaths reported. Ten people have been injured. 
Health facilities 
The Silimauri Health Centre suffered damages. These include cracks in the underground well, destruction of the staff house,
damages in the toilet, ground collapse, and fiberglass tank damages. Many drugs were also damaged and destroyed. The
government identified the need to make sure that the sustainability of services, water and health personnel (nurses) are
provided. 
RESPONSE 
Government Response 
Shefa Province organized an emergency meeting with the National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) and Geology &
Mines. An assessment team composed of representatives from Geology and Mines, NDMO and Shefa Province was deployed
on 31 May. A full task force team will be sent soon. NDMO has already issued a community warning on safety of population
especially having to do with buildings and landslides. 
Initial assessment has identified possible challenges: 
- Difficulty to access by road on the island, 
- Limited financial resources, 
- Limited provincial and national capacity, 
- Limited water supply infrastructure on the island, and 
- Coordination among different levels as well as lack of equipment and machineries to clear the road. 
Assessment is currently ongoing in order to: 
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- Determine the number of affected villages/families and children and identify most vulnerable groups, 
- Determine the key health problems and identify appropriate management and interventions, 
- Conduct testing of water, 
- Assess food security of the affected villages, 
- Provide and pre-position appropriate inputs/supplies (ORS, basic drugs, water containers, etc) in target areas, and 
- Pre-inform community leaders of the importance of developing community participation in partnership with provincial
authorities. 
The following priorities were identified: 
- Water and water containers, 
- Health assessment and monitoring, 
- Supply of drugs, 
- The function of several health facilities must be ensured. Tavalapa Dispensary and Magarisu Aid Post must be reopened.
Bongabonga Aid Post must also resume its operation. Additional nurses are needed. One tent must be provided for health
staff. 
Recommendations: 
- Immediate deployment of various technical personnel for a thorough assessment of the disaster, 
- Urgent maintenance and repair of access roads, 
- Distribution of water and water containers, 
- Distribution of temporary shelters (tarpaulin, tents), 
- Food supply might be needed, Medical supplies, and 
- Portable seismograph 
The multi-sectoral team led by NDMO identified medium term plans namely: 
- Rebuilding of water tanks and underground wells, 
- Health Sanitation and inspections, 
- Rebuilding of Silimauri Health Centre staff house and facility, schools and community buildings, 
- Repair of roads and drainages, and 
- Community assistance to rebuild gardens and houses. 
Long term rehabilitation plans are as follows: 
- Proper assessment of water supply system to the community, health centres and schools (RWS projects), 
- Relocation of some communities to safe sites (high risk communities include Lumbukuti, Panita, Meriu, Kurumabe and
Lupalea), 
- Relocation of Silimauri Health Centre, Hiwelo and Nottage Primary Schools, and 
- Permanent monitoring of volcanic activity 
MOH Response 
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The Ministry of Health is in close coordination with the NDMO and other government agencies for the assessment of health
needs of affected populations. 
WHO Response 
WHO continues to collaborate with the Ministry of Health and other UN agencies for updates and technical assistance. 
Source of Information 
NDMO, Department of Geology & Mines, Tongoa Police Post and Shefa Province 
Multi-Sectoral Assessment Team 
Republic of Vanuatu 
For further information please contact: 
Dr Bernard Fabre-Teste
WHO Vanuatu
Fax: (+676) 23-928
Email: fabretesteb@wpro.who.int 
Dr. Ken Chen
WHO South Pacific
Fax: (+679) 330-0462 and 331-1530
Email: chenk@wpro.who.int 
Steven Iddings
WHO South Pacific
Fax: (+679) 3234166
Email: iddingss@wpro.who.int 
WHO Regional Office
Dr Arturo Pesigan
Tel: (632) 528 9810
Fax: (632) 528 9072
Email: pesigana@wpro.who.int
 
05 Jun 2009
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ReliefWeb report — 
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Vanuatu: Vanuatu Floods Situation Report 1
Original published date:  22 Apr 2009
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Health   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source:  World Health Organization
  Disaster type:    Flood   
  Origin notes:    http://www.wpro.who.int/sites/eha/disasters/2009/van_floods/van_floods_22042009.htm   
  
  
GENERAL INFORMATION 
Recent rainfall caused floods and landslides severely affecting North Ambrym on 15 April 2009. Ten villages between Linbul
and Ranvetlam, with an estimated population of 950 (239 households), were affected. 
Damage to Infrastructure 
The floods totally damaged a piped water supply facility that covers 5 villages. The people in these communities have no
alternative water sources except a few concrete wells. Landslide also damaged 45% of the gardens in affected villages. There
are no reports of major damages to roads and houses. However, since existing dirt roads are not well developed, distribution
of relief may be affected. 
HEALTH IMPACT 
Damages to water supply systems in 5 villages and local gardens pose health risks to affected families because of limited safe
water and food supply. Only a few houses have concrete wells which contain rain water that may last for only a week unless
the area would receive sufficient rainfall. 
Authorities are regularly monitoring affected areas for water borne diseases and other health risks. 
Casualties 
As of 22 April 2009, there have been no reported casualties. 
Health facilities 
The health center in Nenble is not accessible by vehicles but only by boat or by foot. The water system of Fire Mountain
Clinic in Ranon area is also damaged and requires urgent repair. 
RESPONSE 
Government Response 
The government has organized assessment teams and have received initial results. 
Early assessment has pointed out to the following needs: 
- Assessment and close monitoring of safe water and food supply 
- Regular monitoring/surveillance of diseases and outbreaks 
- Repair of water system at the Fire Mountain Clinic; additional water needs for the clinic 
- Distribution of drinking water for around 400 people living in 5 villages, the Fire Mountain Clinic, and Ranon Junior
Secondary School for 30 days 
- Distribution of water containers/tanks for rain water catchment 
- Urgent repair or replacement of the damaged water supply system 
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- Assessment and installation of durable water supply system as a middle-long term strategy 
- Contingency planning for short term food distribution if required 
- Identification of the needs and strategy for agriculture/livelihood recovery 
Since houses were not damaged, emergency shelter and non-food items are not needed at this moment. 
MOH Response 
The Ministry of Health collaborates with other government agencies and health partners to assess the situation and provide
timely and appropriate response. 
WHO Response 
The World Health Organization is in close communication with the Ministry of Health and other international partners during
the assessment phase. WHO is willing to provide technical support and assistance to the Ministry of Health of Vanuatu. 
Source of Information 
Ambrym Crisis Situation Report 
National Disaster Council 
Ministry of Internal Affairs 
Republic of Vanuatu 
For further information please contact: 
Dr Bernard Fabre-Teste
WHO Vanuatu
Tel: (+676) 23-217
Fax: (+676) 23-928
Email: fabretesteb@wpro.who.int 
Dr. Ken Chen
WHO South Pacific
Fax: (+679) 330-0462 and 331-1530
Email: chenk@wpro.who.int 
Steven Iddings
WHO South Pacific
Tel: (+679) 3234102
Fax: (+679) 3234166
Email: iddingss@wpro.who.int 
WHO Regional Office
Dr Arturo Pesigan
Tel: (632) 528 9810
Fax: (632) 528 9072
Email: pesigana@wpro.who.int
 
22 Apr 2009
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/306535
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu Volcanic Eruption Situation Report 2
Original published date:  17 Apr 2009
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Health   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source:  World Health Organization
  Disaster type:    Volcano   
  Origin notes:    http://www.wpro.who.int/sites/eha/disasters/2009/van_volc_eruption/van_volcaniceruption_17042009.htm   
  
  
GENERAL INFORMATION 
Volcanic activity of Ambrym Volcano in Vanuatu continued since it started in December 2008. Dark smoke and acid rain
continue to overshadow the island of Ambrym posing a threat to human lives. 
More than 9 000 people are affected particularly those who live on the western part of Ambrym. 
Information concerning volcanic activity came from the Nourmea Based Research Team during the past months.
Unfortunately, they have dismantled their monitoring equipment and have returned to Nourmea. Currently, there is no
monitoring station and reports are only based from Ambrym communities who are affected by acid rain. 
Damage to Infrastructure 
There are no reported damages to infrastructure as of 16 April 2009. 
HEALTH IMPACT 
Almost 95% of the population is dependent on rainwater collection or underground water as an alternative source of water
which has been contaminated by acid rain. The underground water, however, was also reported to be left open and exposed to
acidic rain fall, and therefore, contaminated as well. 
In West Ambrym there is only one water supply system in operation. Other water supply systems have stopped operations
because sources have dried up, pipe systems were damaged, and have not been maintained due to limited funds. 
Because acid rain damages agricultural crops, food supply has been expected to decrease. The amount and quality of food
therefore poses a threat to human health. 
Consumption of acidic or unclean water and contaminated food have caused diarrhea, redness in the eyes, stomach pain, and
other symptoms. The number of patients, particularly infants, children and the elderly, have increased in health centres. 
RESPONSE 
Government Response 
The Government of Vanuatu has allocated funds for phase 1 operation that includes: 
- Deployment of Rapid Technical Assessment team composed of national technical team representatives 
- Community assessment and awareness program 
- Possible fresh and clean water re-supply operation to fill all existing water wells and tanks in most affected communities 
- Deployment of scientific teams 
- Procurement of extra logistics supplies to be used during water re-supply operation 
- Volcanic evacuation planning consultations at community, provincial and national levels. 
- Establish FOB EOC at West Ambrym 
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- Plan a food supplementary supply strategy 
- Maintain close consultations with partners and donor communities 
- Prepare international appeal to address immediate support 
- Deploy communication support between worst affected areas such as Malampa Province and the National Government
through NDC. 
Monitoring of volcanic activity of Ambrym and other volcanoes will continue in the next few months. 
Community Response 
Communities have been warned on the dangers of volcanic activities as well as the consequences of consuming water
contaminated by acid rain. They continue to boil their water before drinking just hoping to reduce some risk; the safety of this
practice is yet to be confirmed by experts next week. There have been recommendations regarding food consumption. 
Monitoring and information between their communities is ongoing at all times. The needs of special groups such as pregnant
women, infants, elderly, and the disabled are being constantly checked. Possible evacuation centres and the availability of
resources are being assessed. 
Malampa Provincial Councils have conducted a preliminary assessment covering the whole island. Their reports are expected
next week. 
MOH Response 
The Ministry of Health continues to coordinate with the National Disaster Committee, other government agencies, and local
and international health partners to assess the situation and provide timely and appropriate response. 
WHO Response 
The World Health Organization is supporting the deployment of a Ministry of Health team to Ambrym. Other UN agencies
such as UNICEF and UN OCHA are involved in assessment, response and coordination meetings with government agencies.
WHO will continue to provide technical support and assistance to the Ministry of Health of Vanuatu. 
Source of Information 
Ambrym Crisis Situation Report 
National Disaster Council 
Ministry of Internal Affairs 
Republic of Vanuatu 
For further information please contact: 
Dr Bernard Fabre-Teste
WHO Vanuatu
Tel: (+676) 23-217
Fax: (+676) 23-928
Email: fabretesteb@wpro.who.int 
Dr. Ken Chen
WHO South Pacific
Tel: (+679) 3-304600
Fax: (+679) 330-0462 and 331-1530
Email: chenk@wpro.who.int 
Steven Iddings
WHO South Pacific
Tel: (+679) 3234102
Fax: (+679) 3234166
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Email: iddingss@wpro.who.int 
WHO Regional Office
Dr Arturo Pesigan
Tel: (632) 528 9810
Fax: (632) 528 9072
Email: pesigana@wpro.who.int
 
17 Apr 2009
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/306542
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu Volcanic Eruption Situation Report 1
Original published date:  07 Apr 2009
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Health   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source:  World Health Organization
  Disaster type:    Volcano   
  Origin notes:    http://www.wpro.who.int/sites/eha/disasters/2009/van_volc_eruption/van_volcanoeruption_07042009.htm   
  
  
GENERAL INFORMATION 
The geohazards team of the Department of Geology, Mines and Water Resources of Vanuatu confirmed continuing volcanic
activity of Ambrym Volcano in Vanuatu. Beginning December 2008, there has been increased emission of volcanic gases
particularly sulfur oxide causing acid rain over surrounding areas. Acid rain and ash fall threaten water safety as well as crops
and vegetation. More than 9 000 people from 40 villages in Ambrym have been affected. 
In 1951, eruption of Ambrym Volcano caused the evacuation of the population to nearby islands. It also destroyed the
Lonwolwol Hospital at Dip Point in 1913. 
Damage to Infrastructure 
There were no reported damages to infrastructure as of 6 April 2009. 
HEALTH IMPACT 
Acid rain threatens safe water and food supply of residents in nearby areas. There have been no casualties and damages to
hospitals and health facilities. 
Identified needs include provision, allocation and deployment of health and medical supplies to affected communities. People
with special needs such as persons with disabilities, pregnant women, mental health patients, and the elderly will be taken
cared of. Temporary shelters might be needed in case there is evacuation ordered by the government. 
RESPONSE 
Government Response 
The government has identified priorities for action. Short term priorities included protecting lives and reducing risks,
assessment of water supply and quality, strengthening food programmes, disaster preparedness and response planning, and
the establishment of a Provincial Disaster Risk Management Committee at Malampa Province consisting of different
government agencies and people's organizations. 
Mid-term priorities focus on monitoring and assessment of the situation in nearby islands such as Gaua, Ambae, Lopeyi,
South Malekula, Epi, and Paama. Long term priorities include the use of scientific and technical information on Ambrym
volcanic risk in decision making and development project planning. 
In response to initial assessment reports, the government has done the following: 
- Deployment of a scientific monitoring and technical assessment and awareness team 
- Continued monitoring and coordination with international experts 
- Emergency water re-supply operation 
- Food aid programme for 2 months 
- Ambrym volcano preparedness and evacuation planning 
- Water bore hole and underground water projects installation 
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Malampa Province activated the Malampa Disaster Committee to coordinate needs and responses. Rapid Assessment Teams
have been deployed in 3 April 2009. Food and water supply has been ensured. Continuous meetings and updates between the
National Disaster Committee, responding agencies and health partners have been done regularly. 
Lack of expertise, volcano and earthquake monitoring equipment, and poor roads and infrastructure are major challenges to
the emergency response. 
Community Response 
Community leaders also contributed to monitoring, awareness and information dissemination. High risk villages were advised
to move out voluntarily. People have been encouraged to empty their water tanks and wells and use underground water
sources. 
MOH Response 
The Ministry of Health continued to coordinate with the National Disaster Committee, other government agencies, and local
and international health partners to assess the situation and provide timely and appropriate response. 
WHO Response 
The World Health Organization, UNICEF and UN-OCHA have been involved in assessment, response and coordination
meetings with government agencies. WHO will continue to provide technical support and assistance to the Ministry of Health
of Vanuatu. 
Source 
Ambrym Crisis Situation Report 
National Disaster Council 
Ministry of Internal Affairs 
Republic of Vanuatu 
For further information please contact: 
Dr Bernard Fabre-Teste
WHO Vanuatu
Tel: (+676) 23-217
Fax: (+676) 23-928
Email: fabretesteb@wpro.who.int 
Dr. Ken Chen
WHO South Pacific
Tel: (+679) 3-304600
Fax: (+679) 330-0462 and 331-1530
Email: chenk@wpro.who.int 
Steven Iddings
WHO South Pacific
Tel: (+679) 3234102
Fax: (+679) 3234166
Email: iddingss@wpro.who.int 
WHO Regional Office
Dr Arturo Pesigan
Tel: (632) 528 9810
Fax: (632) 528 9072
Email: pesigana@wpro.who.int
 
07 Apr 2009
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/210829
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu: Volcanic Eruption OCHA Situation Report No. 1
Original published date:  12 Jun 2006
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Agriculture, Coordination, Food and Nutrition, Health, Water Sanitation Hygiene   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source:  UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
  Disaster type:    Volcano   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Ref: OCHA/GVA - 2006/0105
OCHA Situation Report No. 1
Vanuatu – Volcanic Eruption
This situation report is based on information provided by the Regional Disaster Response Advisor in Fiji.
Situation
1. Lopevi Volcano erupted on May 9. While the island of Lopevi is uninhabited the nearby islands of Paama and Ambrym
have had heavy ash fall affecting the water supplies and crops of communities in South-East Ambrym and Paama. The total
population of Paama is 1572, comprised of 23 villages and 511 households.
2. On the island of Paama, the two main cash crops of vanilla and pepper have been damaged badly and are no longer likely
to provide a source of income. On both islands, staple foods such as wild yams, kumala, taros, bananas and coconut trees
have either been damaged or destroyed.
3. Communities in South East Ambrym and Paama are experiencing health problems caused by the consumption of
contaminated food and water as well as the inhalation of ash. Head pain, skin infections, diarrhea, vomiting and respiratory
difficulties have been reported in the communities affected.
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Needs
4. All affected communities are in immediate need of fresh water, food for at least the next four months and medical
attention. 
5. Longer term needs include water and sanitation experts to test the main water supply and water catchments and the
provision of seedlings to reestablish staple crops.
National Response
6. The Government has recently completed an assessment on the affected communities in South-East Ambrym and Paama.
The final assessment report includes a number of recommendations to the National Disaster Committee on the type of
assistance required.
7. The Government has not requested international assistance to date.
8. The National Red Cross society has offered 300 water containers and a water sanitation engineer.
International Response
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9. The UN Disaster Management Team had a meeting on 9 June and decided to offer the support of sending an assessment
team, medical staff and relief items to the National Disaster Management Office.
10. OCHA is in close contact with the Government of Vanuatu, the UN Resident Coordinator’s Office in Fiji and will revert
with further information as it becomes available. This situation report, together with further information on ongoing
emergencies, is also available on the OCHA Internet Website at 
http://www.reliefweb.int
.
Tel.: +41-22-917 12 34
Fax: +41-22-917 0023
E-mail: ochagva@un.org
In case of emergency only:
Tel. +41-22-917 20 10
Desk Officers:
Ms. Masayo Kondo - direct Tel. +41-22-917 1997
Mr. Masaaki Nakagawa - direct Tel. +41-22-917 4034
Press contact:
(GVA) Ms. Byrs Elizabeth - direct Tel. +41-22-917 2653
(NY) Ms. Stephanie Bunker - direct Tel. + 1-917 367 5126
 
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
12 Jun 2006
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/195587
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu: Mt. Ambae Volcano Information Bulletin No. 2
Original published date:  22 Dec 2005
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Water Sanitation Hygiene, Shelter and Non-Food Items   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source: IFRC
  Disaster type:    Volcano   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
The Federation's mission is to improve the lives of vulnerable people by mobilizing the power of humanity. It is the world's
largest humanitarian organization and its millions of volunteers are active in over 1 83 countries.
In Brief
This Bulletin (no. 02/2005) is being issued for information only, and reflects the status of the situation and information
available at this time. The Federation is not seeking funding or other assistance from donors for this ope ration at this time.
The Situation
Mt. Ambae volcano continues to discharge steam, ash and sulphur gases into the air since it first erupted on 27 November
2005 and has displaced thousands of the Ambae island's 10,000 strong population, which is located north of the Vanuatu
archipelago. The displaced are spread out in 17 emergency evacuation centres across the island, ranging from about ten
people per camp to nearly 800 (please see table in the next section for a list of people per camp).
In Ambae, the local population relies on wells or tanks to collect rain water as there are no rivers or streams in the island.
Water is therefore a high priority in this emergency situation, and such a shortage can potentially lead to outbreaks of
health-related issues. Risk of contamination is also high if water supplies are not protected appropriately. The provincial
authorities have tried to mitigate potential outbreaks by creating health posts at each relocation centre.
There has been a series of small quakes on 10 December. Scientists have also established the formation of a second vent that
is pumping up to 10,000 feet of steam into the air, while the first continues to pour ash into the summit's crater lake, Vui. The
level of volcanic activity remains unchanged at level 2.
A national disaster management office meeting has been held in Port Villa on 19 December 2005 to discuss findings and
long-term options for resettlement. For now, chances of evacuation seem low.
Red Cross and Red Crescent action
To date, Red Cross and Red Crescent action in support of the Vanuatu Red Cross Society (VRCS) has consisted of water and
sanitation support as well as relief. The Red Cross has been seen as one of the leading agencies providing humanitarian
assistance to people at the centres. Relief provided by the VRCS, Federation and its partners include:
Family kits
Water tanks
Tarpaulin
Organizing and shipping water from Port Vila to Ambae
Providing cooking utensils for the centre
Providing appropriate information of humanitarian needs to provincial coordinating committee
Registration of relocated people
Assessments in the 17 emergency centres (please see table below) around Ambae have also been conducted by a New
Zealand Red Cross (NZRC) water and sanitation delegate and a disaster management officer from the Solomon Islands Red
Cross (SIRC). Majority of camps are located in schools and problems may arise when schools reopen in six weeks. 
#
Relocation
Centres
Male >16yrs
Female >16yrs
Children 1-16yrs
Baby <1yr
Special
Needs
Total
1
Arorongo
26
16
10
3
55
2
Nanivele
30
29
57
7
5
121
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3
Namboe
25
26
40
2
2
95
4
Lovunivili
28
22
44
1
1
96
5
Longana
25
32
31
5
1
94
6
Narontambe
14
12
16
5
1
48
7
Quirutaro
10
9
12
31
8
Lolopuepue
145
122
147
16
430
9
Ambaebulu
48
61
87
1
197
10
Lovusi
18
8
13
39
11
Vureas
20
29
41
90
12
Saratamata
59
56
48
163
13
Torgil
248
239
270
17
774
14
Loviundau
3
4
5
1
13
15
Wailengi
21
25
50
6
2
104
16
Londua
118
113
214
23
8
476
17
Navuturiki
117
96
210
21
1
445
total
3271
Table 1: Number of people in each emergency centre on Ambae. These figures were collected two weeks after the relocation.
Out of the 17, three to four centres have been prioritized as needing ongoing assistance and management support, which
include Torgil in East Ambae, as well as Londua and Navutiriki in West Ambae. 
In Torgil, the assessment team has found that there are insufficient sanitation facilities and water supply for the 700 odd
people in this camp. Although there are a number of empty centres nearby, many seem reluctant to move.
However, updates on 21 December 2005 indicate that an undisclosed number of people have begun moving to the nearby
centres, thereby easing the overcrowded situation. More pit latrines have also been dug in Torgil. Rain in East Ambae is
sufficient for the population's drinking needs.
In West Ambae, the Red Cross is concerned about camps in Londua and Navutiriki. Centre inhabitants are running out of
water because of low water moisture levels in the west. While drinking water is being shipped in, the inhabitants are using
sea water for washing and in their other daily routines. There have been some logistical constraints delaying the transport of
water containers to the western part of the island, which have been resolved for now. The Vanuatu Red Cross Society is also
shipping 8 x 200 litres of water to West Ambae with more to follow, along with spades , shovels, extra large cooking pots and
plastic bowls for washing hands.
To ease water woes west of the island, the VRCS will deliver a desalination unit funded by the Australian Agency for
International Development (AUSAID) to the Nduidui area. The unit will have the capacity to provide 3,000 litres of water per
day – enough for drinking and cooking at both emergency camps in West Ambae. It will remain on site until an adequate
water supply for the people is available. There is a health clinic in Nduidui.
Only one out of the six boreholes around Ambae has water because of the dry climate and basalt rock terrain. The borehole
has not been operational however since cyclone Ivy in 2003, and the Federation and VRCS are looking into rehabilitating it
as soon as possible.
Two varieties of water testing kits have been donated or funded by AUSAID and the World Health Organization (WHO) and
have been provided to the Vanuatu Red Cross Society, supported by the Federation. The first, Delagua coliform kits, will
require training from the NZRC water and sanitation delegate to operate and maintain, which will be given to nominated
persons. The second are 100 H2S paper testing kits, which are easier to use and will be distributed in Ambae with the
appropriate health education.
Distribution of more family kits in Ambae is being constrained by statistical and logistical issues, but is expected to resume
soon. The VRCS and other Red Cross staff/delegate in the operation remain in close contact with the regional delegation.
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Recommendations and plans
The Red Cross has identified some possible gaps and areas for further or continuous action during the course of the
emergency operation:
Carry out recommendations to fulfill water and sanitation needs
Maintain monitoring of the camps' situation and continue provid ing information
Move some people from Torgil to other empty camps
Monitor health situation and plan for health promotion
Dig additional latrines in West Ambae, Torgil and other centres with large population
Red Cross field personnel to develop their own action plan
Continue providing weekly situation reports to VRCS national office to address immediate needs
Improve coordination and planning on the ground.
For further information specifically related to this operation please contact: 
Vanuatu Red Cross Society: email: redcross@vanuatu.com.vu, phone: +678.27418; fax: +678.22599.
Federation regional delegation in Fiji: M s Rea Noponen (acting head of regional delegation); email rea.noponen@ifrc.org
phone: +679.3311855; fax: +679.3311406.
Federation Secretariat in Geneva: Ms. Hyun Ji Lee (Pacific r egional officer, Asia and Pacific department); email:
hj.lee@ifrc.org; phone: +41.22.7304260; fax: +41.22.7330395.
All International Federation assistance seeks to adhere to the Code of Conduct for the International Red Cross and Red
Crescent Movement and Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO's) in Disaster Relief and is committed to the Humanitarian
Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response (Sphere) in delivering assistance to the most vulnerable. For
longer-term programmes in this or other countries or regions, please refer to the Federation's Annual Appeal. For support to
or for further information concerning Federation programmes or operations in this or other countries, or for national society
profiles, please also access the Federation's website at 
http://www.ifrc.org
 
22 Dec 2005
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/194306
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu: Volcanic Eruption OCHA Situation Report No. 2
Original published date:  08 Dec 2005
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Coordination, Health, Water Sanitation Hygiene   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source:  UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
  Disaster type:    Volcano   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Ref: OCHA/GVA - 2005/0218 
OCHA Situation Report No. 2
Vanuatu - Volcanic Eruption 
This situation report is based on information provided by the Government of Vanuatu and the UN Resident Coordinator's
Office in Fiji. 
Situation 
1. Mt. Ambae volcano erupted on 27 November in Ambae Island of Vanuatu. Volcanic tremors continue to occur but the
level of activity is moderate. At this moment there is no possibility of lahars. Volcanologists from New Zealand and French
are expecting that this activity could last for the next week, eventually slowing down. If the activity would remain as it is
now, an eruption could cause more dry ash and acid rain to fall over nearby villages. 
2. According to the National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) of Vanuatu, there has been no casualty so far. Villagers
are moving to ten relocation centers in low-risk area of the island. The number of evacuees is 2,130 and the authorities expect
between 5,000 -7,000 to be evacuated. Some of the communities have left Ambae for other islands. 
National Response 
3. The Government has not yet declared a state of emergency but a state of preparedness. The situation report released on 6
December by the NDMO stated that the Government had not issued any request for international assistance but identified
potential needs such as water containers, water tanks, cooking utensils, food and shelter. 
4. Although no major medical cases have been reported yet, the Ministry of Health has put on standby a team of doctors and
nurses and has prepared medical supplies to be sent to Ambae. Research officers are on the island to identify wells to channel
water to communities, as there is a shortage of water. Communities in the island are using up their local food crops. Families
living in the capital, Port Vila, and other islands are sending food supplies. 
International Assistance 
5. The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) is supporting the Vanuatu Red Cross Society (VRCS) and NGOs in
providing water containers to the affected communities. Other international organizations are on standby. UNICEF has
already dispatched 200 water containers through the VRCS for the relocation centers. 
6. According to a report issued by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), the VRCS
has distributed 66 family kits, two water tanks and has prepared to send further 240 family kits. 
7. OCHA is in close contact with the Government of Vanuatu, the UN Resident Coordinator's Office in Fiji and the
Government of New Zealand and will revert with further information as it becomes available. This situation report, together
with further information on ongoing emergencies, is also available on the OCHA Internet Website at http://www.reliefweb.int
A map of Vanuatu is at 
http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/RWB.NSF/db900LargeMaps/SKAR-64GDJJ?OpenDocument&cc=vut&rc=5 
 
Tel.: +41-22-917 12 34
Fax: +41-22-917 00 23
E-mail: ochagva@un.org 
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In case of emergency only: Tel. +41-22-917 20 10 
Desk Officers: 
Mr. Masaaki Nakagawa, direct Tel. +41-22-917 4034 
Press contact: 
(GVA) Ms. Byrs Elizabeth, direct Tel. +41-22-917 2653
(N.Y.) Ms. Stephanie Bunker, direct Tel. + 1-917 367 5126
 
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
08 Dec 2005
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/194169
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu: Mt. Ambae Volcano Information Bulletin No. 1
Original published date:  06 Dec 2005
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Shelter and Non-Food Items, Water Sanitation Hygiene   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source: IFRC
  Disaster type:    Volcano   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
The Federation's mission is to improve the lives of vulnerable people by mobilizing the power of humanity. It is the world's
largest humanitarian organization and its millions of volunteers are active in over 181 countries.
In Brief 
This Bulletin (no. 01/2005) is being issued for information only, and reflects the status of the situation and information
available at this time. The Federation is not seeking funding or other assistance from donors for this operation at this time. 
The Situation 
On 27 November, a volcano erupted on Ambae island, situated north of a central chain of islands in the Vanuatu archipelago
know n for their active volcanoes. There have been no casualties so far, but ash spewed forth by the volcano has blanketed
houses and food crops . The provincial centre reports that a total of 8,163 villagers live in high-risk areas near the volcano -
classified as the red zone (see annex for a map of the various zones) - with 3,607 of them living west of Ambae island, 1,390
in the south and 3,166 in the north. There are concerns that the ash may affect the respiratory systems of local residents and
contaminate water sources, as fears of further possible eruptions mount. 
The government of Vanuatu has declared the island a disaster zone, and communities in high-risk areas have started to
relocate to safe areas. Two ships are on standby near the coast in case a rapid evacuation would be required. The
on-the-ground relocation is being coordinated by the local provincial disaster committee, while some communities have also
begun evacuating southwards or to nearby villages on their own. To accommodate a potential need for increased health care,
health workers from two nearby islands have relocated to Ambae, while local health centres have increased their capacity. 
Vanuatu's national disaster management office (NDMO) has activated its emergency operations centre, and has been
providing regular updates on the situation. Two UN experts have been despatched to assist the NDMO. A team of scientists is
conducting surveys of the site, and a volcanologist has travelled to the area with additional equipment to step up monitoring
activities on Ambae island. 
Red Cross and Red Crescent action 
The Vanuatu Red Cross Society (VRCS) has been actively involved since Mt. Ambae erupted last week. Two VRCS staff has
been deployed to Ambae to support the authorities and local volunteers with evacuation efforts and the distribution of relief
supplies to safe areas. The VRCS has been coordinating closely with the NDMO and the provincial disaster committee, as
well as the Federation regional delegation in Suva and other Red Cross partners. A liaison volunteer has been attached to the
NDMO to obtain updated reports on the evolving situation. Staff and volunteers have recently undergone emergency
response team training, and can now put the ir newly acquired skills to use as several have been despatched to the disaster
area to help coordinate and distribute relief items. 
So far, VRCS has distributed 66 family kits comprising blankets, tarpaulins, water containers, candles and kitchen sets in safe
areas on Ambae. In addition, two water tanks of 4,000 litres each have also been installed in safe areas. Volunteers in Port
Vila have prepared a further 240 family kits which will be dispatched at the earliest opportunity, while VRCS and UNICEF
are preparing to send an additional 250 jerry cans (25 litre each). Preparations to purchase additional water containers and
tarpaulins in case of an evacuation have been made. 
The VRCS is also receiving support from other partners in the region. The Solomon Islands Red Cross disaster management
officer is being deployed to Vanuatu to support the VRCS, while a water and sanitation delegate from the New Zealand Red
Cross will be deployed on Saturday. In addition, the New Zealand Red Cross has despatched 2000 high quality dust masks
which will arrive in Port Vila on Thursday. The Federation's regional delegation has so far contributed USD 2,000 (CHF
2,634) towards operational costs. 
As the situation develops further operational support may be considered. Meanwhile the replenishment of relief items will be
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a priority in order to ensure minimum stock levels during the cyclone season. 
For further information specifically related to this operation please contact: 
Vanuatu Red Cross Society: email: redcross@vanuatu.com.vu, phone: +678.27418; fax: +678.22599. 
Federation regional delegation in Fiji: Mr. Leon Prop (head of regional delegation); email: prop.leon@ifrc.org; phone:
+679.3311855; fax: +679.3311406. 
Federation Secretariat in Geneva: Ms. Hyun Ji Lee (Pacific regional officer, Asia and Pacific department); email:
hj.lee@ifrc.org; phone: +41.22.7304260; fax: +41.22.7330395. 
All International Federation assistance seeks to adhere to the Code of Conduct for the International Red Cross and Red
Crescent Movement and Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO's) in Disaster Relief and is committed to the Humanitarian
Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response (Sphere) in delivering assistance to the most vulnerable. 
For longer-term programmes in this or other countries or regions, please refer to the Federation's Annual Appeal. For support
to or for further information concerning Federation programmes or operations in this or other countries, or for national
society profiles, please also access the Federation's website at http://www.ifrc.org
 
06 Dec 2005
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Vanuatu: Vanuatu: Volcanic Eruption OCHA Situation Report No. 1
Original published date:  01 Dec 2005
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Coordination   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source:  UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
  Disaster type:    Volcano   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Ref: OCHA/GVA - 2005/0212
OCHA Situation Report No. 1
Vanuatu - Volcanic Eruption 
This situation report is based on information provided by the Government of Vanuatu and the UN Resident Coordinator's
Office in Fiji. 
Situation 
1. Mt. Ambae volcano erupted on 27 November in Ambae Island of Vanuatu. Twelve to fifteen villages with a total
population of about 5,000 have been affected. No casualties have been reported. There are no damages to houses except that
they are covered with ash. Although people are still living in their homes, ash could affect their respiratory system and
contaminate the source of water supply. Food crops have also been covered with ash. They have crops to last for only one to
two weeks. 
2. Ambae has a crater lake. There is a risk that the volcano could further erupt and cause flooding in the valleys. The
Government may need to evacuate about 5,000 people in the high-risk area. The National Disaster Management Office
(NDMO) is working on an evacuation plan. 
National Response 
3. A national coordination team is monitoring the situation. The Vanuatu Police and the Mobile Force are informing the
community of the situation. A senior volcanologist in Ambae is also providing the NDMO with information. They have
approached the Government to seek international assistance for equipment for monitoring seismic activity. 
4. On 29 November, a national assessment team, consisting of representatives from the different Government sectors and
NDMO went to Ambae Island and carried out an assessment. 
International Assistance 
5. A meeting was held on 1 December with representatives of the donor community (Australia, France, New Zealand), Red
Cross movement and other NGOs and the Government of Vanuatu (the Prime Minister's Office and NDMO). Another similar
meeting is scheduled on 3 December in the capital, Port Vila. 
6. New Zealand has received an official request from the Government of Vanuatu for 1) deployment of a volcanologist to
assist in monitoring volcanic activity and 2) emergency response preparedness and logistic support. Further information on
detailed requirements is awaited. 
7. OCHA is in close contact with the Government of Vanuatu, the UN Resident Coordinator's Office in Fiji and the
Government of New Zealand and will revert with further information as it becomes available. This situation report, together
with further information on ongoing emergencies, is also available on the OCHA Internet Website at http://www.reliefweb.int
Tel.: +41-22-917 12 34
Fax: +41-22-917 00 23
E-mail: ochagva@un.org 
In case of emergency only: Tel. +41-22-917 20 10 
Desk Officers: 
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Mr. Masaaki Nakagawa, direct Tel. +41-22-917 4034 
Press contact: 
(GVA) Ms. Byrs Elizabeth, direct Tel. +41-22-917 2653
(N.Y.) Ms. Stephanie Bunker, direct Tel. + 1-917 367 5126
 
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
01 Dec 2005
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Vanuatu: Vanuatu - Tropical Cyclone Ivy OCHA Situation Report No. 4
Original published date:  11 Mar 2004
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Coordination, Shelter and Non-Food Items, Water Sanitation Hygiene, Contributions   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source:  UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
  Disaster type:    Tropical Cyclone   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Ref: OCHA/GVA - 2004/0043
OCHA Situation Report No. 4
Vanuatu - Tropical Cyclone Ivy
Occurred: 25-27 February 2004
This situation report is based on information provided by the United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination
(UNDAC) Team in Vanuatu. 
Situation 
1. Tropical Cyclone Ivy has affected more than 54,000 people (or a quarter of the national population) in the islands including
Erromango, Malekula, Ambae, Ambrym, Epi, Pamma, Shepards Group and Tanna. 
2. Sufficient early warning by the Bureau of Meteorology averted a lot of deaths and injuries: there are 2 persons killed, 1
seriously injured, and 7 suffered minor injuries. However, the cyclone has caused serious damage to the daily life of the
affected people. 
3. Over 95 % of water storage facilities, water sources and systems in the affected islands were damaged. Some outbreak of
malaria has been reported in Tanna. More relief activities for water and sanitation, particularly water testing, are urgently
needed. 
4. Within one to two weeks the affected communities will start running out of food. Relief stocks of donors are almost
exhausted and funding is required to enable delivery. 
5. The damages to the houses, buildings and agriculture are as follows:
Approximately 11,000 houses damaged
About half of health centres sustained minor to substantial damages
44 schools and rural training centres damaged on either roofs or walls, with a couple completely destroyed on
Ambryn, as well as a primary school on Paama; The school in Malekula completely buried by the landslide
Cash crops, especially cocoa and kava, mostly destroyed; Coconut plantations also seriously damaged
Immediate Needs 
6. The priority for the Government is to meet minimum water needs and health standards, and to repair schools. The
immediate relief needs identified include:
Tarpaulins of different sizes to schools, health centres and affected communities
Water containers for schools, health centres and affected communities
Water purification tablets
Vegetable seed packets
Provision of tools to support immediate community recovery programmes for Ambrym, Malekula and Epi
Medical supplies for schools and health centers
Food aid
Education kits
Logistical support.
National Response 
7. 30,000 household relief packages have been delivered so far. These packages provide the minimum to sustain life and
some home comforts. 
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8. The National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) is now focusing on planning for the distribution of more relief
materials. The Government is conducting sectoral assessment to determine further emergency assistance, as well as medium
and long term recovery programmes. 
International Response 
9. OCHA has provided an emergency grant of USD 10,000 for transportation of relief items. 
10. The UNDAC Team is supporting the NDMO in coordination and administrative functions as well as in assessment
particularly of water supply and sanitation in cooperation with UNICEF and WHO. 
11. OCHA is in close contact with the NDMO through the UNDAC Team in Vanuatu and the office of the OCHA RDRA for
the Pacific, based in Fiji, and will revert with further information as it becomes available. 
12. This situation report, together with information on other ongoing emergencies, is also available on the OCHA Internet
Website at http://www.reliefweb.int 
MAP - Vanuatu: Storm track of Cyclone Ivy
 
CONTACTS 
Telephone: +41-22-917 12 34
Fax: +41-22-917 00 23
E-mail: ochagva@un.org 
In case of emergency only: Tel. +41-22-917 20 10 
Mr. Soichi Nakajima
Direct Tel. +41-22-917 40 34 
Press contact:
(in GVA) Ms. Madeleine Moulin-Acevedo Direct Tel. +41-22-917 3160 
(in N.Y.) Ms. Stephanie Bunker Direct Tel. +1-917-367 51 26
 
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
11 Mar 2004
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Vanuatu: Vanuatu - Tropical Cyclone Ivy OCHA Situation Report No. 3
Original published date:  04 Mar 2004
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Coordination, Contributions   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source:  UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
  Disaster type:    Tropical Cyclone   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Ref: OCHA/GVA - 2004/0037
OCHA Situation Report No. 3
Vanuatu - Tropical Cyclone Ivy
Occurred: 25-27 February 2004 
OCHA has mobilised a United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination (UNDAC) Team, who arrived in Port Vila, the
capital, on Tuesday 2 March. This situation report is based on information provided by the UNDAC Team. 
Situation 
1. Tropical Cyclone Ivy struck Vanuatu on 25 -27 February from north to south, affecting all the six provinces of the country
(Torba, Sanma, Penama, Malampa, Shefa and Tafea). 
2. The disaster assessments conducted to date indicate that the central and southern provinces have experienced significant
damage to crops and houses. A further aerial survey conducted with assistance from Australia and France confirmed that
more than 36,000 people have been affected in the islands of Ambae, Ambrym, Epi, Erromango, Maewo, Malekula,
Shepherds Group and Tanna. This number is likely to increase as the figures for Shefa Province are collected. 
3. One report received by the Vanuatu National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) indicated that all the houses in one
village had been destroyed, crops had been washed away, and residents were sheltering under the collapsed roof of the
meeting house. Water and food were scarce. It is considered that this situation might be similar in many of the low-lying
communities. 
National Response 
4. The Vanuatu Government has responded quickly to the cyclone and has made available an amount of VT 25,000,000
(USD 236,000) for disaster recovery. The emergency response operation (called Operation TC IVI) has been activated and
will last for two to four weeks. 
5. The current priority for the Government is to complete assessments of damage. The Government will decide whether it
declares a national state of emergency as soon as these comprehensive assessments are collated and the NDMO can develop a
plan of action for the recovery phase. 
6. The Vanuatu Red Cross Society is playing a vital role in logistics and distribution of relief packages. More than 2,000
household relief packages have been distributed by the Red Cross via a French Air Force helicopter, a French Navy ship and
the MV Brisk, a local supply ship. 
International Response 
7. The UNDAC Team has started to support the NDMO in coordination and administrative functions in cooperation with the
Emergency Management Australia (EMA) Team. The UNDAC team is also supporting the NDMO in the assessments in
Tafea Province, utilising a helicopter offered from AusAID, as well as in Shefa Province. These two assessments will have
been completed by Monday 8 March. The team will further support the assessment in the northern provinces as well as the
coordination and planning of inter-sectroal relief activities. 
8. Australia, France and New Zealand continue to provide relief supplies and support to the Vanuatu Government through
their respective bilateral cooperation (FRANZ agreement). This support includes: 
- deployment of the EMA Team to support the NDMO in information management and coordination 
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- deployment of French military and fire services specialists to assist in assessment and mitigation of the damage caused by
two sunken fishing boats at the main wharf 
- pledge of EUR 25,000 (USD 31,100) by the French Government to support relief efforts. 
9. WHO and UNICEF in cooperation with the Health Department of Vanuatu are purchasing mosquito nets and vector
control agents for destruction of mosquito larvae. UNICEF has arranged for the delivery of medical kits capable of providing
medicines for up to 1,000 persons for three months. 
10. OCHA is in close contact with the NDMO through the UNDAC Team in Vanuatu and the office of the OCHA RDRA for
the Pacific, based in Fiji, and will revert with further information as it becomes available. 
11. This situation report, together with information on other ongoing emergencies, is also available on the OCHA Internet
Website at http://www.reliefweb.int 
Telephone: +41-22-917 12 34
Fax: +41-22-917 00 23
E-mail: ochagva@un.org 
In case of emergency only: Tel. +41-22-917 20 10 
Mr. Soichi Nakajima
Direct Tel. +41-22-917 40 34 
Press contact:
(in GVA) - Ms. Elizabeth Byrs, direct Tel. +41-22-917 26 53
(in N.Y.) - Ms. Stephanie Bunker, Direct Tel. +1-917-367 51 26
 
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
04 Mar 2004
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/143242
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu: Cyclone Ivy Information Bulletin No. 3
Original published date:  01 Mar 2004
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Shelter and Non-Food Items   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source: IFRC
  Disaster type:    Tropical Cyclone   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) Allocated: N/A
The Federation's mission is to improve the lives of vulnerable people by mobilizing the power of humanity. It is the world's
largest humanitarian organization and its millions of volunteers are active in over 180 countries. For more information: 
www.ifrc.org
 
In Brief 
The Vanuatu Red Cross relief operation is now well underway, with the main focus on providing basic relief including
tarpaulins, blankets, kitchen sets, water containers, purification tablets and other items to affected families. 
The Situation 
Tropical Cyclone Ivy struck Vanuatu on 26 February, moving southwards from the northern islands and affecting all six
provinces . Vanuatu's northern and central islands were hit by winds of 130-150 km/h with gusts of up to 200km/h,
accompanied by torrential rain and surging seas as the cyclone moved slowly through the island-nation. 
The small island of Paama is among the worst affected, while Ambryn, Epi, NW Maevo, NW Ambae and the east coast of
Malakula have also sustained significant damage. Based on an aerial survey by Orion aircraft on Saturday and limited reports
from the various islands, it is estimated that over 2,500 families are seriously affected, with many houses totally destroyed or
severely damaged. One fatality has been reported so far, while some people suffered fractures, cuts and minor injuries from
flying debris. There is concern about access to safe water in the disaster area, while there have also been substantial crop
losses. Telephone and radio communications with outlying islands which were severely disrupted have mostly been restored,
and in Port Vila evacuated residents from coastal and low lying areas have returned home. 
The two fishing boats which sank in Port Vila's main wharf have been towed away, clearing access to container ships. The
international airport is fully operational. 
An UNDAC team has been mobilised to support assessment and coordination efforts in close cooperation with the National
Disaster Management Office (NDMO), with the first two members scheduled to arrive tomorrow . 
Red Cross and Red Crescent action 
The Vanuatu Red Cross Society has been active on Efate since Thursday, when over 1,000 people were evacuated to
temporary shelters in Port Vila as a precaution. All evacuees have now returned home, and general cleaning up efforts are
underway in the capital. The main focus of the operation has now shifted to providing immediate relief items to those most
affected on the outer islands. 
A total of up to 3,000 family kits will be distributed, each containing one tarpaulin, two blankets, one hygiene kit, kitchen
utensils, one water container (20 litre) and water purification tablets, rope, candles, matches and seeds. The first consignment
of around 1,000 packs will be dispatched to the affected areas tonight. The MV Brisk leaves Port Vila on Monday evening,
calling at Paama, Ambrae, Malekula and Epi. 
More than fifty volunteers are currently assembling and packing the relief supplies, using temporary warehouse space and
two vehicles made available by a local supermarket chain. The Red Cross operation is supported by the governments of
Australia, France and New Zealand, who have provided both financial and in-kind contributions. 
The Federation's regional delegation mobilised its Papua New Guinea head of delegation to support the operation, and to help
determine any future needs. The regional finance officer will join the team in Vanuatu on Thursday, as well as an experienced
relief delegate made available by the New Zealand Red Cross. 
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The International Federation is not seeking any funding or in-kind contributions at this stage. Further needs for support will
be determined once detailed assessments have been completed. 
For a full description of the National Society profile, see 
www.ifrc.org
 
For further details please contact: 
Vanuatu Red Cross Society; David Neal, (interim CEO); Phone + 678 27148 / 50889. ; Fax/phone + 678 22599; email
redcross@vanuatu.com.vu 
Pacific Regional Delegation; Mr. Leon Prop (Head of Regional Delegation), Suva, Fiji; Phone +679 331 1855; Fax +679 331
1406; email ifrcfj01@ifrc.org 
Federation, Geneva; EunHee Cho (Regional Officer), Phone +41 22 7304392; Fax +41 22 733 0395; email
eunhee.cho@ifrc.org 
All International Federation Operations seek to adhere to the Code of Conduct and are committed to the Humanitarian
Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response (SPHERE Project) in delivering assistance to the most vulnerable. 
For support to or for further information concerning Federation operations in this or other countries, please access the
Federation website at http://www.ifrc.org 
For longer -term programmes, please refer to the Federation's Annual Appeal.
 
01 Mar 2004
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/143315
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu - Tropical Cyclone Ivy OCHA Situation Report No. 2
Original published date:  01 Mar 2004
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Coordination, Contributions   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source:  UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
  Disaster type:    Tropical Cyclone   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Ref: OCHA/GVA - 2004/0035
OCHA Situation Report No. 2
Vanuatu - Tropical Cyclone Ivy
Occurred: 25-27 February 2004 
This situation report is based on information provided by the National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) in Vanuatu,
through the office of the OCHA Regional Disaster Response Adviser (RDRA) for the Pacific. 
Event and Impact 
1. From 25 to 27 February, Tropical Cyclone Ivy passed over Vanuatu in the South Pacific with winds of up to 190
kilometres per hour, torrential rains and surging seas, affecting rural communities in the outer islands. 
2. An aerial survey confirmed that more than 24,000 people were so far affected in the islands of Maewo, Ambae, Malekula,
Ambrym, Paama and Epi. The survey will be conducted further for Tanna, Erromango and the off-shore islands of Efate. One
woman was reported dead under a landslide another person injured in the same incident. Due to problems with antennas and
other fittings, northern islands have been out of contact since 25 February. 
3. Report from US Peace Corps on the island of Maewo indicated that a lot of houses and gardens were damaged. Damage
was reported of schools, medical clinics and water supply systems. 
Emergency Needs 
4. In the above affected islands, the emergency needs are estimated to include tarpaulins, water containers, seeds, and rice.
More details will be provided upon further assessment. 
National and International Response 
5. Provincial Disaster Damage Assessment Team has been mobilized. With the assistance from New Zealand, the Vanuatu
Government conducted an aerial survey to the affected outer islands on 28 February. 
6. Australia has made available a grant assistance of AUD 50,000 (USD 38,500) to support a helicopter reconnaissance
mission to gather more detailed information. In addition, two RAAF Hercules C130 aircraft will arrive in Port Vila today
with urgently needed emergency supplies including 2,400 tarpaulins for shelter, 2,600 water containers and 5,200 packets of
water purification tablets. 
7. France has indicated to support in damage assessment operation by deploying one helicopter. A Navy boat is prepared
bound for Port Vila so it can be used for relief supplies distribution. 
8. New Zealand has announced relief worth about NZD 70,000 (USD 48,000). 
9. Upon request from the Vanuatu Government, OCHA has deployed the United Nations Disaster Assessment and
Coordination (UNDAC) Team in the Pacific. The team is arriving in Port Vila on Tuesday 2 March. 
10. The office of the OCHA RDRA for the Pacific, based in Fiji, is in close contact with the NDMO and will revert with
further information as it becomes available. 
11. This situation report, together with information on other ongoing emergencies, is also available on the OCHA Internet
Website at http://www.reliefweb.int 
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Telephone: +41-22-917 12 34
Fax: +41-22-917 00 23
E-mail: ochagva@un.org 
In case of emergency only: Tel. +41-22-917 20 10 
Mr. Soichi Nakajima
Direct Tel. +41-22-917 40 34 
Press contact:
(in GVA) - Ms. Elizabeth Byrs, direct Tel. +41-22-917 26 53
(in N.Y.) - Ms. Stephanie Bunker, Direct Tel. +1-917-367 51 26
 
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
01 Mar 2004
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/143159
 
Vanuatu: APCEDI Cyclone Ivy Alert No. 17
Original published date:  27 Feb 2004
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    Asia-Pacific Centre for Emergency and Development Information   
Disaster type:  Tropical Cyclone
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Alert 17, Cyclone Ivy 13P / 27 February 2004, Sydney 0700 EDT
Ivy, following a 3 day pattern, weakened in the evening and then gained strength in the early morning. This morning it is still
a strong Category 2 to weak Category 3 storm. The eye has just moved over Tanna and is set to move over Anatom in the
next 3-6 hours at which point it will begin to clear from Vanuatu territory. A large core area of deep convection remains from
the Shepherd Islands in the north to the Loyalty Islands in the southwest. Heavy rains and hurricane force gales remain over
Erromango, Tanna, Anatom and all the Loyalty Islands. Ivy's forward speed continues slowly at 8 knots to the SSE. 
Intermittent squalls and gales continue over the Northern and Central Islands. 
Most predictive models continue to forecast Ivy tracking southeasterly across Anatom and then out of Vanuatu territory in
next 10-12 hours. It will then pass east of New Caledonia and now the official track has it heading south with a possible
direct hit on the North Island of New Zealand. As such, the APCEDI warnings will continue all of Vanuatu from the
Shepherd Islands south. 
The current situation is summarised as follows: 
Damaging Category 2-3 Eyewall-strength Winds and Torrential Rains 
Vanuatu
Tanna
Erromango
Sustained Gales and Heavy Rain approaching damaging Category 2-3 force in the next 4-6 hours 
Vanuatu
Anatom
Intermittent Damaging Gales and Torrential Rains (moving away) 
Vanuatu
Shepherds
Efate
New Caledonia
Loyalty Islands
Intermittent Squalls and Heavy Rain associated with Feeder Bands ( moving away) 
Vanuatu
Maewo
Pentecost
Ambae
Santo
Malakula
Epi
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Given the Category 2-3 nature of the storm, damage overall at this time should be widespread moderate to locally severe for
Erromango, Tanna and Anatom. Widespread moderate and locally severe damage continues to the be reported from the
capital Port Vila. The danger from flash-flooding remains extremely high as the storm creeps so slowly toward the south. As
Ivy continues this slow movement, very heavy widespread rainfall could result in flash-flooding of mountain and hill areas as
well as known flood prone areas. This is especially critical for the large Vanuatu islands. Due to the islands' very high relief
and the slow movement of the storm, flash flooding will be a major threat throughout tonight and tomorrow especially if the
storm continues to pass slowly or even stalls. Locally severe to catastrophic damage will also likely occur in and around the
eye of the storm. Varying degrees of crop damage are also likely. Seas will be very rough to phenomenal resulting in tidal
flooding of low-lying areas. 
Efate and the capital, Port Vila 
The core area of deepest convection has recently moved south of Efate although they will continue with intermittent squalls
with torrential rains and winds for a few more hours. NDMO is reporting widespread moderate to localised severe damage in
Vila as follows:
trees down blocking roads
power lines and poles down
large fishing boat capsized near the main wharf with a resulting oil spill
1700 people in evacuation shelters
power off in parts of Vila but on in other parts
phones mostly functioning
flooding of low-lying areas
some small bridges being washed out
With the entire country including the capital impacted by this event, GOV and the people of Vanuatu will need serious
assistance to coordinate the assessment and relief efforts. 
Larger Northern and Central Vanuatu Islands 
NDMO has established communications with some islands and have had the following reports which have not been
confirmed: 
Maewo- (radio contact)-many unstable and older houses damaged, newer more permanent houses largely withstanding storm.
Ambae -(radio contact)-many houses damaged. 
Ambrym - (telephone contact with west)-school severely damaged, many houses damaged. 
Torrential rains and damaging Category 2-3 winds pounded all the Northern and Central Islands for 2 days. Only intermittent
squalls remain over the Northern Islands. Epi, the Shepherds and Efate are also out of the main core area but intermittent
gales and heavy rains will still continue over this area. The slow moving nature of the storm means that rainfalls in the
hundreds of millimetres will have been registered throughout the region. Flooding from intermittent showers is still possible
as all rivers and streams are running high. 
Larger Southern Vanuatu Islands 
Ivy's center is passing Tanna and will likely hit Anatom later this morning. Widespread moderate to severe damage can be
expected. The slow moving nature of the storm mean that rainfalls in the hundreds of millimetres will have been registered
throughout the region and will be continuing. This will certainly be causing flash flooding of many stream valleys and larger
rivers. The situation in hill and mountain areas of Erromango and Tanna is of particular concern. 
GOV, NDMO and Donors should now prepare themselves for needing to make widespread assessments across almost all of
big islands Vanuatu in the following days. This will be difficult as Vila itself has been hit and suffered at least widespread
moderate to locally severe damage. In addition to flash flooding, coastal flooding and wind damage can be expected at least
in localised areas near the centre. 
Banks Group 
The Banks Group is now out of the main storm area. However, outer feeder band activity is possible. The whole group has
had very heavy rains, very rough seas and increasingly severe winds for almost 48 hours. With the centre having slowly
moved over Mere Lava, this outer island may be particularly hard hit. With the cyclone pulling away from this Group,
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assessments should be done of the areas to determine the degree of wind damage and flooding. Crops are likely badly
affected in some areas. 
Anuta and Tikopia, Solomons 
Anuta and Tikopia are now out of the main area of the storm but are still subject to outer feeder bands. Light to moderate
damage caused by tidal flooding of low-lying areas, crop damage and possibly some damage to unstable structures is
expected given the nearly 48 hours of punishment by this storm. However, the overall damage will not be anywhere as bad as
with Cyclone Zoe. However, the cumulative effects of 3 major cyclones in 14 months (Zoe, Gina and now Ivy) may well be
wearing down the ability of the people and their environment and its resources to sustainably cope. NDMO and Donors
should endeavour to make contact with the islands to assess both the immediate effects of Ivy and cumulative effects of the
last 3 storms on the overall situation. 
Torres Groups, Vanuatu and Santa Cruz Group, Solomons 
Outer feeder bands with heavy rains and squalls are still possible over Vanikolo. Seas remain very rough. The Torres Group,
Vanikolo and to a lesser extent Utupua have received very heavy rainfall from their proximity to this slow moving storm so
some flooding may have occurred. They should be assessed later today. The remainder of the Group has likely only
experienced minor coastal flooding, but contact to all the all the smaller outliers should be undertaken to verify this. 
Loyalty Islands, New Caledonia 
The core convection area has moved over the Group, but with the increasingly southeasterly track, these islands and the main
island of Grande Terre will likely be spared a direct hit although light to locally moderate damage is possible in the Loyalties.
APCEDI will continue monitoring the event. More detailed information about the storm can be found on 
https://metoc.npmoc.navy.mil//jtwc.html
http://www.met.gov.fj/advisories.html
http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html
http://www.afap.org
http://www.afap.org/apcedi
 
Thanks to Job Esau, John Henry and Philip of the Vanuatu NDMO for all the information. 
Kevin Vang
APCEDI Coordinator 
APCEDI is a service of the Australian Foundation for the Peoples of Asia and the Pacific (AFAP) in Sydney, Australia and
the Foundation for the Peoples of the South Pacific International (FSPI) in Suva, Fiji. It is used primarily for internal FSP
information to provide information about affected areas with development projects in the AFAP, FSPI network in the Asia
Pacific Region.
 
27 Feb 2004
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/143171
 
Vanuatu: APCEDI Cyclone Ivy Alert No. 19
Original published date:  27 Feb 2004
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    Asia-Pacific Centre for Emergency and Development Information   
Disaster type:  Tropical Cyclone
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Alert 19, Cyclone Ivy 13P / 27 February 2004, Sydney 1800 EDT
AFAP, FSPI and FSP VANUATU RESPONSE 
With Cyclone Ivy finally moving out of Vanuatu, AFAP has raised an appeal at 
www.afap.org
. Toll free number
1-800-007-308. Even if isolated pockets of severe damage are limited, it is already known that many communities houses,
schools and buildings have been damaged on some islands, and communities will need help to rebuild these. Communities
will also very likely need help with sourcing and replanting crops given the widespread nature of crop damage in many areas.
FSP Vanuatu and AFAP will work closely with the NDMO and AusAID to identify key geographic and sectoral areas of
need. 
The FSP Vanuatu Office in Vila experienced only minor damage from rain leaking in, so the office is completely functional.
FSP Vanuatu has field offices, staff, contractors and contacts throughout the country who can assist with initial assessment
and relief efforts as well as any longer term rehabilitation. FSPI and AFAP staff from other Pacific countries could be
brought in if needed. FSP Vanuatu has worked closely with the NDMO for many years. 
Morgan Armstrong, FSP Vanuatu Advisor, will be leading the FSP Vanuatu assessment and relief effort. He can be contacted
in Vila at 0011-678-22915 (office) and 0011-678-24492 (home) and email marmstrong@fsp.org.vu. 
APCEDI will continue monitoring the event. More detailed information about the storm can be found on 
https://metoc.npmoc.navy.mil//jtwc.html
http://www.met.gov.fj/advisories.html
http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html
http://www.afap.org
http://www.afap.org/apcedi
 
Thanks to Job Esau, John Henry and Philip of the Vanuatu NDMO for all the information. 
Kevin Vang
APCEDI Coordinator 
APCEDI is a service of the Australian Foundation for the Peoples of Asia and the Pacific (AFAP) in Sydney, Australia and
the Foundation for the Peoples of the South Pacific International (FSPI) in Suva, Fiji. It is used primarily for internal FSP
information to provide information about affected areas with development projects in the AFAP, FSPI network in the Asia
Pacific Region.
 
27 Feb 2004
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/143184
 
Vanuatu: APCEDI Cyclone Ivy Alert No. 18
Original published date:  27 Feb 2004
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    Asia-Pacific Centre for Emergency and Development Information   
Disaster type:  Tropical Cyclone
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Alert 18, Cyclone Ivy 13P / 27 February 2004, Sydney 1700 EDT
Cyclone Ivy is moving out of Vanuatu Territory and into New Caledonian Territory this evening. Again it seems to have
strengthened from recent photos and data into a Category 3 storm. APCEDI has received much information today from across
Vanuatu, and been trying to compile all of it. Kay aspects of the information include: 
1. RADIO VANUATU -- Radio Vanuatu has been off the air since yesterday night (nearly 24 hours), and communities across
the islands are desperate to get information back up so they no what's happening and what to do. Repairing Radio Vanuatu as
soon as possible so it can broadcast is of utmost importance and should be focused on by donors. 
2. OVERALL DAMAGE -- Damage throughout Vanuatu can be best classified as Widespread Moderate which indicates lots
of trees down, gardens damaged, insecure structures fallen down, landslides, widespread electricity and phone outages.
However, isolated pockets of severe damage are being increasingly reported. Severe Damage refers to widespread destruction
of houses, community buildings and crops. Unconfirmed reports speak of Ambrym, South Pentecost and Ambae as areas of
particular damage to houses, schools and churches, and contact is still out with the many areas including in the Southern
Islands. These pockets of severe damage need to be identified and dealt with quickly. Australia, NZ and France aid agencies
are working closely with the Vanuatu Government in this effort. 
3. DEATH CONFIRMED ON MALAKULA 
One woman has been confirmed dead by NDMO from a landslide near Lamap. All other people have been accounted for in
this landslide incident. 
4. FISHING BOATS LEAKING OIL AT VILA WHARF 
According to NDMO 2 Taiwanese fishing boats have been sunk and are leaking oil and many other small boats sunk in and
around the wharf. These leaks should be assessed and contained as soon as possible if significant. 
Ivy, appears to again strengthened to a Category 3 storm as it leaves Vanuatu. A nicely formed large eye is evident between
Anatom and Mare Island, New Caledonia. Anatom is just moving out of the eastern part of the eyewall although both it and
Tanna remain under deep convection. Erromango is still experiencing intermittent gales and torrential rains. The rest of
country has intermittent light to moderate shower activity with isolated strong winds and breezy conditions. 
Most predictive models continue to forecast Ivy tracking southeasterly across the isolated Caledonian outliers of Walpole,
Matthew and Hunter Islands. It will then continue southeast with a possible direct hit on the North Island of New Zealand. As
such, the APCEDI warnings will continue for Southern Vanuatu from the Erromango south. Since APCEDI does not work in
New Caledonia, we will not be issuing alerts but people in Loyalties and eastern outliers should take preparations and
monitor the storm tonight and tomorrow. 
The current situation is summarised as follows: 
Damaging Category 2-3 Eyewall-strength Winds and Torrential Rains 
Vanuatu
Anatom
Intermittent Damaging Gales and and Torrential Rains (moving away) 
Vanuatu
Erromango
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Tanna
New Caledonia
Loyalty Islands (particularly Mare)
Damaging Category 2-3 Eyewall-strength Winds and Torrential Rains in next 6-12 hours 
New Caledonia
Hunter, Matthew and Walpole Islands
Intermittent Squalls and Heavy Rain associated with Feeder Bands ( moving away) 
Vanuatu
Efate
Shepherds Group
Malakula
Epi
Given the Category 2-3 nature of the storm, damage overall at this time should be widespread moderate to locally severe for
Tanna and Anatom. The danger from flash-flooding for the Southern Islands remains extremely high as the storm creeps so
slowly away from Vanuatu. As Ivy continues this slow movement, very heavy widespread rainfall could result in
flash-flooding of mountain and hill areas as well as known flood prone areas. Varying degrees of crop damage are also likely.
Seas will be very rough to phenomenal resulting in tidal flooding of low-lying areas. 
Efate and the capital, Port Vila 
The core area of deepest convection has recently moved south of Efate although they will continue with intermittent squalls
with torrential rains and winds for a few more hours. NDMO is reporting widespread moderate to localised severe damage in
Vila as follows:
Radio Vanuatu off the air for 24 hours
trees down blocking roads (many now removed but many remaining in outer areas of capital
power lines and poles down
many small boats/yachts sunk on the wharf and several washed up on beaches
two fishing boat capsized near the main wharf with a resulting oil spill
2000 people in evacuation shelters at the height of the storm (most all returned home now)
power off in parts of Vila (particularly in outer parts) but on in other parts (on in city centre).
phones mostly functioning
flooding of low-lying areas
some small bridges being washed out
With the entire country including the capital impacted by this event, GOV and the people of Vanuatu will need serious
assistance to coordinate the assessment and relief efforts. 
Larger Northern and Central Vanuatu Islands 
NDMO has established communications with some islands and have had the following reports which have not been
confirmed: 
Maewo- (radio contact)-many unstable and older houses damaged, newer more permanent houses largely withstanding storm.
Pentecost-Many homes damaged in the souther npart of the island 
Ambae-(radio contact)-many houses damaged. 
Ambrym-(telephone contact with west)-school severely damaged, many houses damaged. 
Torrential rains and damaging Category 2-3 winds pounded all the Northern and Central Islands for 2 days. Only intermittent
showers remain over the Northern Islands. Epi, the Shepherds and Efate are also out of the main core area but intermittent
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winds and rains will still continue over this area. The slow moving nature of the storm means that rainfalls in the hundreds of
millimetres will have been registered throughout the nation. Flooding from intermittent showers is still possible as all rivers
and streams are running high. 
Larger Southern Vanuatu Islands 
Ivy's center is passing to the southwest of Anatom as it exits the country. Widespread moderate to locally severe damage can
be expected on Erromango, Tanna and Anatom. The slow moving nature of the storm mean that rainfalls in the hundreds of
millimetres will have been registered throughout these islands and will be continuing. This could certainly be causing flash
flooding of many stream valleys and larger rivers. The situation in hill and mountain areas of Erromango and Tanna is of
particular concern. 
GOV, NDMO and Donors should now prepare themselves for needing to make widespread assessments across almost all of
big islands Vanuatu in the following days. This will be difficult as Vila itself has been hit and suffered at least widespread
moderate to locally severe damage. In addition to flash flooding, coastal flooding and wind damage can be expected at least
in localised areas near the centre. 
Banks Group 
The Banks Group is now out of the main storm area. The whole group has had very heavy rains, very rough seas and
increasingly severe winds for almost 48 hours. With the centre having slowly moved over Mere Lava, this outer island may
be particularly hard hit. With the cyclone pulling away from this Group, assessments should be done of the areas to determine
the degree of wind damage and flooding. Crops are likely badly affected in some areas. 
Anuta and Tikopia, Solomons 
Anuta and Tikopia are now out of the main area of the storm. Light to moderate damage caused by tidal flooding of low-lying
areas, crop damage and possibly some damage to unstable structures is expected given the nearly 48 hours of punishment by
this storm. However, the overall damage will not be anywhere as bad as with Cyclone Zoe. However, the cumulative effects
of 3 major cyclones in 14 months (Zoe, Gina and now Ivy) may well be wearing down the ability of the people and their
environment and its resources to sustainably cope. NDMO and Donors should endeavour to make contact with the islands to
assess both the immediate effects of Ivy and cumulative effects of the last 3 storms on the overall situation. 
Torres Groups, Vanuatu and Santa Cruz Group, Solomons 
Seas remain very rough. The Torres Group, Vanikolo and to a lesser extent Utupua have received very heavy rainfall from
their proximity to this slow moving storm so some flooding may have occurred. They should be assessed later today. The
remainder of the Group has likely only experienced minor coastal flooding, but contact to all the all the smaller outliers
should be undertaken to verify this. 
New Caledonia 
The core convection area has moved over the Group, but with the increasingly southeasterly track, these islands and the main
island of Grande Terre will likely be spared a direct hit although light to locally moderate damage is possible in the Loyalties.
The eastern outliers of Hunter, Matthew and Walpole Islands will be heavily impacted tonight and into tomorrow. 
APCEDI will continue monitoring the event. More detailed information about the storm can be found on 
https://metoc.npmoc.navy.mil//jtwc.html
http://www.met.gov.fj/advisories.html
http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html
http://www.afap.org
http://www.afap.org/apcedi
 
Thanks to Job Esau, John Henry and Philip of the Vanuatu NDMO for all the information. 
Kevin Vang
APCEDI Coordinator 
APCEDI is a service of the Australian Foundation for the Peoples of Asia and the Pacific (AFAP) in Sydney, Australia and
the Foundation for the Peoples of the South Pacific International (FSPI) in Suva, Fiji. It is used primarily for internal FSP
information to provide information about affected areas with development projects in the AFAP, FSPI network in the Asia
Pacific Region.
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27 Feb 2004
Page 81/124
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/143215
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu: Cyclone Ivy Information Bulletin No. 2
Original published date:  27 Feb 2004
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    IFRC   
Disaster type:  Tropical Cyclone
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) Allocated: N/A
The Federation's mission is to improve the lives of vulnerable people by mobilizing the power of humanity. It is the world's
largest humanitarian organization and its millions of volunteers are active in over 180 countries. For more information: 
www.ifrc.org
 
In Brief 
This document is being issued for information only. The Federation is not seeking any funding or other assistance from
donors for this operation at this time. 
The Situation 
Tropical Cyclone Ivy struck Vanuatu on 26 February, moving southwards from the northern islands and affecting all six
provinces . Vanuatu's northern and central islands were hit by winds of 130-150 km/h with gusts up to 200 km/h as the
cyclone moved slowly through the island-nation, made up of over 80 islands with an estimated total population of 200,000
people. 
No loss of life has been reported so far, but initial reports suggest there has been significant damage to houses and schools,
while trees were uprooted and crops damaged by strong winds. Some areas are experiencing power cuts. Telephone and radio
communications with outlying islands were severely disrupted, making accurate damage and needs assessments more
difficult. An aerial assessment has been postponed at this stage due to high winds. 
In Port Vila, residents from coastal and low lying areas were evacuated, while the rest of the population was advised to stay
indoors. A number of people suffered cuts and scratches from flying debris, as well as some fractures . 
Some roads in or around the capital were blocked by fallen trees, but most were cleared by Friday afternoon. Two long-liner
fishing boats sank in Port Vila's main wharf, seeping oil and blocking access to container and cruise ships. The international
airport is operational, but fuel supplies have run very low. Domestic flights were on hold, but may resume soon. 
Red Cross action 
The Vanuatu Red Cross is working closely with the National Disaster Management Office in Port Vila, and has been actively
involved in the evacuation of over 1,000 people to temporary shelters in Port Vila. It is expected that most people will be able
to return home shortly. Volunteers are now assessing immediate needs in order to prioritise relief distributions to areas of
greatest needs. As communications with other islands are still limited, further information is also being collected through
radio and satellite phone links of the Peace Corps volunteers' network. 
Two disaster containers with relief supplies were pre-positioned in the capital Port Vila (Efate) and Luganville (Santo). Each
contained basic supplies including tarpaulins, sheets, jerry cans, kitchen sets and tents as well as tools and first aid kits. 
The New Zealand Red Cross has released NZD 10,000 for the replenishment of essential relief supplies and the Federation
made CHF 3,000 available to support initial assessments and the mobilisation of volunteers. The needs for further support
will be determined once more detailed information becomes available and initial needs assessment has been finalis ed. 
For a full description of the National Society profile, see 
www.ifrc.org
 
For furt her details please contact: 
Vanuatu Red Cross Society; David Neal, (interim CEO); Phone + 678 50889. ; Fax/phone + 678 22599; email
redcross@vanuatu.com.vu or david.neal@redcross.org.nz 
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Pacific Regional Delegation; Mr. Leon Prop (Head of Regional Delegation), Suva, Fiji; Phone +679 331 1855; Fax +679 331
1406; email ifrcfj01@ifrc.org 
Federation, Geneva; EunHee Cho (Regional Officer), Phone +41 22 7304392; Fax +41 22 733 0395; email
eunhee.cho@ifrc.org 
All International Federation Operations seek to adhere to the Code of Conduct and are committed to the Humanitarian
Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response (SPHERE Project) in delivering assistance to the most vulnerable. 
For support to or for further information concerning Federation operations in this or other countries, please access the
Federation website at http://www.ifrc.org 
For longer -term programmes, please refer to the Federation's Annual Appeal.
 
27 Feb 2004
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/143221
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu - Tropical Cyclone P13/Ivy OCHA Situation Report
No. 1
 
  Original published date:    27 Feb 2004   
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Coordination   
Content format:  Situation Report
  Language:    English   
  Source:    UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs   
  Disaster type:    Tropical Cyclone   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Ref: OCHA/GVA - 2004/0031
OCHA Situation Report No. 1
Vanuatu - Tropical Cyclone P13/Ivy
Occurred: 25-27 February 2004 
This situation report is based on information provided by the National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) in Vanuatu,
through the office of the OCHA Regional Disaster Response Adviser (RDRA) for the Pacific. 
1. From 25 to 27 February, Tropical Cyclone P13 (locally called Ivy) passed over Vanuatu in the South Pacific with winds of
up to 190 kilometres per hour, torrential rains and surging seas. No deaths, injured or people missing have been reported.
However, it is feared that the cyclone may have caused widespread damage to the country, which consists of 80 islands with
200,000 inhabitants, particularly severe damage in rural communities in the outer islands. 
2. According to the NDMO, contact has been made with some of the outer islands, including Maewo, Ambae, and Ambryn. It
is reported that a lot of houses were damaged in those islands. Contact to other islands has not yet been established. 
3. Efate, the island where Port Vila, the Capital, is situated, did not sustain serious damage. Some damage of houses, trees
and power lines has been reported. 
4. Reconnaissance to assess damage in the outer islands was supposed to take place this afternoon, but the strong winds have
delayed it. 
5. The NDMO is working closely with aid agencies from Australia, France and New Zealand for damage assessments. The
National Disaster Council will hold a meeting on the disaster situation tomorrow morning and will discuss whether
international assistance is needed. 
6. OCHA has mobilised the UNDAC Team in the Pacific in case of need for assistance, pending a request from the Vanuatu
Government. The office of the OCHA RDRA for the Pacific, based in Fiji, is in close contact with the NDMO and will revert
with further information as it becomes available. 
7. This situation report, together with information on other ongoing emergencies, is also available on the OCHA Internet
Website at http://www.reliefweb.int 
MAP - Vanuatu: Cyclone Ivy - Situation map
 
Telephone: +41-22-917 12 34
Fax: +41-22-917 00 23
E-mail: ochagva@un.org 
In case of emergency only: Tel. +41-22-917 20 10 
Mr. Soichi Nakajima
Direct Tel. +41-22-917 40 34 
Press contact:
(in GVA) - Ms. Elizabeth Byrs, direct Tel. +41-22-917 26 53
(in N.Y.) - Ms. Stephanie Bunker, Direct Tel. +1-917-367 51 26
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UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
27 Feb 2004
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/143245
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu: Cyclone Ivy Information Bulletin No. 1 - correction
Original published date:  27 Feb 2004
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Protection and Human Rights, Shelter and Non-Food Items   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
Source: IFRC
  Disaster type:    Tropical Cyclone   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) Allocated: N/A
The Federation's mission is to improve the lives of vulnerable people by mobilizing the power of humanity. It is the world's
largest humanitarian organization and its millions of volunteers are active in over 180 countries. For more information: 
www.ifrc.org
 
In Brief 
This document is being issued for information only. The Federation is not seeking any funding or other assistance from
donors for this operation at this time. 
The Situation 
Tropical Cyclone Ivy struck Vanuatu on 26 February, moving southwards from the northern islands and affecting all six
provinces. Vanuatu's northern and central islands were hit by winds of 130-150 km/h with gusts up to 200 km/h as the
cyclone moved slowly through the island-nation, made up of over 80 islands with an estimated total population of 200,000
people. 
No loss of life has been reported so far, but initial reports suggest there has been significant damage to houses and schools,
while trees were uprooted and crops damaged by strong winds. Some areas are experiencing power cuts. Telephone and radio
communications with outlying islands were severely disrupted, making accurate damage and needs assessments more
difficult. An aerial assessment has been postponed at this stage due to high winds. 
In Port Vila, residents from coastal and low lying areas were evacuated, while the rest of the population was advised to stay
indoors. A number of people suffered cuts and scratches from flying debris, as well as some fractures . 
Some roads in or around the capital were blocked by fallen trees, but most were cleared by Friday afternoon. Two long-liner
fishing boats sank in Port Vila's main wharf, seeping oil and blocking access to container and cruise ships. The international
airport is operational, but fuel supplies have run very low. Domestic flights were on hold, but may resume soon. 
Red Cross action 
The Vanuatu Red Cross is working closely with the National Disaster Management Office in Port Vila, and has been actively
involved in the evacuation of over 1,000 people to temporary shelters in Port Vila. It is expected that most people will be able
to return home shortly. Volunteers are now assessing immediate needs in order to prioritise relief distributions to areas of
greatest needs. As communications with other islands are still limited, further information is also being collected through
radio and satellite phone links of the Peace Corps volunteers' network. 
Two disaster containers with relief supplies were pre-positioned in the capital Port Vila (Efate) and Luganville (Santo). Each
contained basic supplies including tarpaulins, sheets, jerry cans, kitchen sets an d tents as well as tools and first aid kits. 
The New Zealand Red Cross has released NZD 10,000 for the replenishment of essential relief supplies and the Federation
made CHF 3,000 available to support initial assessments and the mobilisation of volunteers. The needs for further support
will be determined once more detailed information becomes available and initial needs assessment has been finalis ed. 
For a full description of the National Society profile, see 
www.ifrc.org
 
For further details please cont act: 
- Vanuatu Red Cross Society; David Neal, (interim CEO); Phone + 678 50889. ; Fax/phone + 678 22599; email
redcross@vanuatu.com.vu or david.neal@redcross.org.nz 
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- Pacific Regional Delegation; Mr. Leon Prop (Head of Regional Delegation), Suva, Fiji; Phone +679 331 1855; Fax +679
331 1406; email ifrcfj01@ifrc.org 
- Federation, Geneva; EunHee Cho (Regional Officer), Phone +41 22 7304392; Fax +41 22 733 0395; email
eunhee.cho@ifrc.org 
All International Federation Operations seek to adhere to the Code of Conduct and are committed to the Humanitarian
Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response (SPHERE Project) in delivering assistance to the most vulnerable. 
For support to or for further information concerning Federation operations in this or other countries, please access the
Federation website at http://www .ifrc.org 
For longer -term programmes, please refer to the Federation's Annual Appeal.
 
27 Feb 2004
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/143153
 
Vanuatu: APCEDI Cyclone Ivy Alert No. 15
Original published date:  26 Feb 2004
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    Asia-Pacific Centre for Emergency and Development Information   
Disaster type:  Tropical Cyclone
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Alert 15, Cyclone Ivy 13P / 26 February 2004, Sydney 1830 EDT
Vila is now under the eye of Ivy and the situation has calmed within the eye zone, but they are awaiting the other half of the
storm. Luckily phone contact has been maintained with the NDMO all day and this evening. Ivy is still a Category 3 storm
and intensifying slowly. 
Category 3 Eyewall force winds will push into Erromango shortly with the eye likely passing either over the island or just off
the west coast. It is still possible that it will intensify into a Category 4 storm around this time. Ivy continues as a strong storm
with serious implications for the damage scenario across Central and Southern Vanuatu. Vanuatu NDMO have lost
communications to many of the Northern and Central Islands. However recently phone contact was established with West
Ambrym, and some radio contact is being maintained with Maewo and Ambae. Donors will need to plan now on how to cope
with this very widespread event which will have impacted every island in the nation by the time it is finished and likely done
serious damage to the capital. 
Reports are being posted at 
www.afap.org/apcedi
 which is off of our main website at 
www.afap.org
 
A large area of deep convection remains at the centre of the storm. The central core of deep convection reaches from southern
Malakula in the north to Anatom in the south extending to New Caledonia's Loyalty Islands. The inner core of deepest
convection reaches from Southern Malakula and Ambrym in the north to Tanna in the South. This is the area of most
concern. Ivy's forward speed continues slow at 6 knots to the south. 
Torrential rains continue over the southern Southern Malakula, Ambrym, Epi the Shepherds, Efate, Erromango, Tanna and
Anatom. Intermittent heavy rains are over Northern Malakula, Maewo, Pentecost and Ambae. Due to the slow forward speed
of Ivy, this torrential rainfall situation will continue today throughout Northern, Central and Southern Vanuatu. It continues to
clear from the Banks Group and Santo and should start to clear from Maewo, Ambae and Pentecost shortly. Outer feeder
bands with squalls continue to effect Tikopia, Vanikolo and the Banks and Torres Groups. 
Most predictive models continue to forecast Ivy tracking southerly across the length of Vanuatu throughout the next 24 hours
and then on to the east of New Caledonia. The official track out of the JTWC has Ivy moving over the Southern Islands
tonight and then on to the Loyalty Islands and New Caledonia tomorrow as a Category 4 west of Tanna for 12 hours and then
declining thereafter. As such, the APCEDI warnings will continue all of Vanuatu from the Banks Group south. The APCEDI
alerts for the Santa Cruz Group and the Torres Group will be lifted again although isolated short-lived squalls will still occur.
If the eye feature maintains it current course, it will continue to pass over or just west or over Erromango in 2-4 hours and
then to Tanna a few hours later. 
The current situation is summarised as follows: 
Damaging Category 3 Eyewall-strength Winds and Torrential Rains 
Vanuatu
Epi
Shepherds
Efate
Erromango
Damaging Category 2 Winds and Torrential Rains (moving away) 
Vanuatu
Southern Malakula
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Paama
Ulveah
Ambrym
Sustained Gales and Heavy Rain approaching damaging Category 3 force in the next 3-6 hours 
Vanuatu
Tanna
Anatom
Intermittent Gales and Heavy Rain associated with Feeder Bands (Storm now moving away) 
Vanuatu
Maewo
Pentecost
Ambae
Santo
Banks Group
Northern and Central Malakula
Solomons
Tikopia
Vanikolo
New Caledonia
Loyalty Islands (Feeder Bands pushing in soon).
Given the Category 3 nature of the storm, damage overall at this time should be widespread moderate to severe from Epi on
south. Damage to the capital Vila could be severe although at present mostly widespread moderate damage is being reported
from NDMO. The danger from flash-flooding remains extremely high as the storm creeps so slowly toward the south. As Ivy
continues this slow movement, very heavy widespread rainfall could result in flash-flooding of mountain and hill areas as
well as known flood prone areas. This is especially critical for the large Vanuatu islands. Due to the islands' very high relief
and the slow movement of the storm, flash flooding will be a major threat throughout tonight and tomorrow especially if the
the storm continues to pass slowly or even stalls. Locally severe to catastrophic damage will also likely occur in and around
the eye of the storm. Varying degrees of crop damage are also likely. Seas will be very rough to phenomenal resulting in tidal
flooding of low-lying areas. 
Efate and the capital, Port Vila 
The eye of the storm has moved over Efate. NDMO is reporting widespread moderate to localised severe damage in Vila as
follows:
trees down blocking roads
power lines and poles down
large fishing boat capsized near the main wharf with a resulting oil spill
1700 people in evacuation shelters
power off in parts of Vila but on in other parts
phones mostly functioning
flooding of low-lying areas
some small bridges being washed out
However the other half of the storm still must go over the capital so more damage, Category 3 winds and torrential rains will
continue for 3-6 hours before dying down into intermittent squalls. With the entire country including the capital impacted by
this event, GOV and the people of Vanuatu will need serious assistance to coordinate the assessment and relief efforts. 
Larger Northern and Central Vanuatu Islands 
NDMO has established communications with some islands and have had the following reports which have not been
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confirmed: 
Maewo- (radio contact)-many unstable and older houses damaged, newer more permanent houses largely withstanding storm.
Ambae-(radio contact)-many houses damaged. 
Ambrym-(telephone contact with west)-school severely damaged, many houses damaged. 
The centre of Ivy is now over Efate. Torrential rains and damaging Category 2-3 winds have been pounding Maewo,
Pentecost, Ambae, Santo, Ambrym and Malakula for 2 days but will subside over night in most northern area. Epi, the
Shepherds and Efate have been under the central core all day and will continue into tonight. The slow moving nature of the
storm mean that rainfalls in the hundreds of millimetres will have been registered throughout the region and will be
continuing. This will certainly be causing flash flooding of many stream valleys and larger rivers. The situation in hill and
mountain areas of Santo, Malakula, Ambae, Pentecost and Ambrym is of particular concern. as will be the high country on
Erromango and Tanna. 
Larger Southern Vanuatu Islands 
The southern eyewall is moving into Erromango and will likely hit Tanna and Anatom later tonight. Widespread moderate to
severe damage can be expected. The slow moving nature of the storm mean that rainfalls in the hundreds of millimetres will
have been registered throughout the region and will be continuing. This will certainly be causing flash flooding of many
stream valleys and larger rivers. The situation in hill and mountain areas of Erromango and Tanna is of particular concern. 
GOV, NDMO and Donors should now prepare themselves for needing to make widespread assessments across almost all of
big islands Vanuatu in the following days. This may be difficult as Vila itself is now likely to be directly hit and experience
serious damage. In addition to flash flooding, coastal flooding and wind damage can be expected at least in localised areas
near the centre. 
Banks Group 
The centre of the storm is finally moving away from the Banks Group. However, heavy feeder band activity remains in the
south. The whole group has had very heavy rains, very rough seas and increasingly severe winds for almost 48 hours. With
the centre having slowly moved over Mere Lava, this outer island may be particularly hard hit. With the cyclone pulling away
from this Group, assessments should be done of the areas to determine the degree of wind damage and flooding. Crops are
likely badly affected in some areas. 
Anuta and Tikopia, Solomons 
Anuta and Tikopia are now out of the centre of the storm but still are in the outer feeder bands. Gales and heavy rains should
start subsiding in the next 6 hours and become more intermittent and less severe after this. Light to moderate damage caused
by tidal flooding of low-lying areas, crop damage and possibly some damage to unstable structures is expected given the
nearly 48 hours of punishment by this storm. However, the overall damage will not be anywhere as bad as with Cyclone Zoe.
However, the cumulative effects of 3 major cyclones in 14 months (Zoe, Gina and now Ivy) may well be wearing down the
ability of the people and their environment and its resources to sustainably cope. NDMO and Donors should endeavour to
make contact with the islands to assess both the immediate effects of Ivy and cumulative effects of the last 3 storms on the
overall situation. 
Torres Groups, Vanuatu and Santa Cruz Group, Solomons 
outer feeder bands with heavy rains and squalls remain over Vanikolo. Seas remain very rough. The Torres Group, Vanikolo
and to a lesser extent Utupua have received very heavy rainfall from their proximity to this slow moving storm so some
flooding may have occurred. They should be assessed later today. The remainder of the Group has likely only experienced
minor coastal flooding, but contact to all the all the smaller outliers should be undertaken to verify this. 
Loyalty Islands, New Caledonia 
Inner feeder bands are now moving in and conditions should begin to deteriorate in the next 4-8 hours. 
General Alert 
Concerns in New Caledonia including the Loyalty Islands should continue to monitor this storm as it develops over the next
few days. Feeder bands will begin moving into the Loyalties in the next few hours. 
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APCEDI will continue monitoring the event. More detailed information about the storm can be found on 
https://metoc.npmoc.navy.mil//jtwc.html
http://www.met.gov.fj/advisories.html
http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html
http://www.afap.org
http://www.afap.org/apcedi
 
Thanks to Job Esau, John Henry and Philip of the Vanuatu NDMO for all the information. 
Kevin Vang
APCEDI Coordinator 
APCEDI is a service of the Australian Foundation for the Peoples of Asia and the Pacific (AFAP) in Sydney, Australia and
the Foundation for the Peoples of the South Pacific International (FSPI) in Suva, Fiji. It is used primarily for internal FSP
information to provide information about affected areas with development projects in the AFAP, FSPI network in the Asia
Pacific Region.
 
26 Feb 2004
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/143163
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu: Cyclone Ivy Information Bulletin No. 1
Original published date:  26 Feb 2004
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    IFRC   
Disaster type:  Tropical Cyclone
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) Allocated: NA
The Federation's mission is to improve the lives of vulnerable people by mobilizing the power of humanity. It is the world's
largest humanitarian organization and its millions of volunteers are active in over 180 countries. For more information: 
www.ifrc.org
 
In Brief 
This document is being for information only. The Federation is not seeking any funding or other assistance from donors for
this operation at this time. Based on further updates and details from assessment reports, or should the situation deteriorate,
the Federation will consider international support through an Appeal. 
The Situation 
Vanuatu's northern and southern islands have been hit by winds of 200 kilometres an hour as Cyclone Ivy moves slowly
through the island nation, today. 
Heavy rains causing widespread flooding has forced some people to leave their homes. Strong winds have torn up trees and
damaged properties while Port Vila, the capital of Vanuatu, has been blasted by winds of up to 70kmph. 
Communication with the northern regions has been cut and there are no reports of people missing or injured. No deaths have
been reported. The National Disaster Management Office in Port Vila is monitoring the disaster although an accurate
assessment of the damage from the outlying islands is difficult to obtain. 
Vanuatu is made up of 80 islands with a total population of 200,000 people and has been rated by the United Nations
Development Programme's Pacific Human Development Report (1999) as one of the most highly vulnerable disaster prone
countries in the Pacific. In 2002, Vanuatu was struck by an earthquake causing severe damage to the capital Port Vila. 
Red Cross and Red Crescent action 
Working closely with other organisations and the National Disaster Management Office the Vanuatu Red Cross is monitoring
the situation in conjunction with the Federation's regional delegation in Suva, Fiji. Staff and volunteers of the Vanuatu Red
Cross are on standby for possible relief operations. 
For a full description of the National Society profile, see 
www.ifrc.org
 
For further details please contact (field to provide/complete relevant contact details): 
- Vanuatu Red Cross; Phone + 678 27418 ; Fax number + 678 22599; email redcross@vanuatu.com.vu 
- Leon Prop, Head of Regional Delegation; Phone + 679 3302047; Fax number + 679 3311406; email ifrcfj01@ifrc.org 
- Federation Desk Officer, Eunhee Cho, Phone 41 22 730 4392; Fax 41 22 733 0395; email eunhee.cho@ifrc.org 
All International Federation Operations seek to adhere to the Code of Conduct and are committed to the Humanitarian
Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response (SPHERE Project) in delivering assistance to the most vulnerable. 
For support to or for further information concerning Federation operations in this or other countries, please access the
Federation website at http://www.ifrc.org 
For longer-term programmes, please refer to the Federation's Annual Appeal.
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26 Feb 2004
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/143178
 
Vanuatu: APCEDI Cyclone Ivy Alert No. 14
Original published date:  26 Feb 2004
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    Asia-Pacific Centre for Emergency and Development Information   
Disaster type:  Tropical Cyclone
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Alert 14, Cyclone Ivy 13P / 26 February 2004, Sydney 1200 EDT
It is now very possible that the centre of Ivy will pass directly over or just west of Port Vila with Category 3 Eyewall force
winds and that by the time Ivy reaches Erromango and Tanna, it will be a Category 4 storm. This seriously increases the
damage scenario across Central and Southern Vanuatu. Vanuatu NDMO have lost communications to almost all of the
Northern and Central Islands. Donors will need to plan now on how to cope with this very widespread event which will have
impacted every island in the nation by the time it is finished and likely done serious damage to the capital. 
Reports are being posted at 
www.afap.org/apcedi
 which is off of our main website at 
www.afap.org
 
Cyclone Ivy again formed a distinct but overcast eye as it approached Epi and Paama. The eyewall has now moved over Epi
and is just going off the south shore in the direction of Emae which should be under or just east of the eye shortly. Ivy is now
a Category 3 storm with very strong winds with sustained winds of 110 knots, much higher gusts, and torrential rains. 
A large area of deep convection remains at the centre of the storm. The central core of deep convection reaches from southern
Santo Island in the north to Erromango in the south and covers all the large Northern Islands and adjacent islets including the
capital Vila. However instead of speeding up as forecasted, its forward speed continues slow at 4-6 knots to the south. 
Torrential rains continue over the southern Southern Santo, Malakula, Maewo, Pentecost, Ambrym, Ambae, Epi the
Shepherds, Efate, Erromango and Tanna. Intermittent heavy rains are over Northern Santo and the Banks Group in the north
and Anatom in the south. Due to the slow forward speed of Ivy, this torrential rainfall situation will continue today
throughout Northern, Central and Southern Vanuatu. It is finally beginning to clear from the Banks Group and Northern
Santo and should start to clear from Maewo shortly. 
Inner feeder bands with gales and heavy rains continue to effect Tikopia but Anuta is now clear. More heavy rain showers are
moving into Vanikolo, but the rest of the Santa Cruz Group and the Torres Group just have patchy light to moderate showers.
Most predictive models continue to forecast Ivy tracking southerly across the length of Vanuatu throughout the next 24-36
hours and then on to the east of New Caledonia. The official track out of the JTWC has Ivy moving over the Central Islands
today and over Vila this afternoon as a Category 3 storm and then on to the Loyalty Islands and New Caledonia tomorrow as
a Category 4 west of Tanna for 12 hours and then declining thereafter. As such, the APCEDI warnings will continue all of
Vanuatu from the Banks Group south and for Anuta and Tikopia in the Solomons. The APCEDI alerts for the Santa Cruz
Group and the Torres Group will be left up for one more report, but it is now likely that most of the Santa Cruz Group as well
as Anuta are now out of harm's way. If the eye feature maintains it current course, it will continue to pass over or just west of
Emae in the next hour and then over Vila in about 4-6 hours. 
The current situation is summarised as follows: 
Damaging Category 3 Eyewall-strength Winds and Torrential Rains 
Vanuatu
Epi
Emae and Shepherd Islands
Damaging Category 2 Winds and Torrential Rains 
Vanuatu
Southern Malakula
Paama
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Ulveah
Ambrym
Efate
Damaging Sustained Gales and Heavy Rain 
Vanuatu
Maewo
Pentecost
Ambae
Northern and Central Malakula
Erromango
Tanna
Sustained Gales and Heavy Rain approaching damaging hurricane force in the next 6-10 hours 
Vanuatu
Anatom
Intermittent Gales and Heavy Rain associated with Inner Feeder Bands (Storm now moving away) 
Vanuatu
Southern Banks Group
Solomons
Tikopia
Vanikolo
New Caledonia
Loyalty Islands (Feeder Bands pushing in soon).
Given the Category 3 nature of the storm, damage overall at this time should be moderate to severe from Ambrym on south.
Damage to the capital Vila could be severe. The danger from flash-flooding remains extremely high as the storm creeps so
slowly toward the south. As Ivy continues this slow movement, very heavy widespread rainfall could result in flash-flooding
of mountain and hill areas as well as known flood prone areas. This is especially critical for the large Vanuatu islands. Due to
the islands' very high relief and the slow movement of the storm, flash flooding will be a major threat throughout tonight and
tomorrow especially if the the storm continues to pass slowly or even stalls. Locally severe to catastrophic damage will also
likely occur in and around the eye of the storm. Varying degrees of crop damage are also likely. Seas will be very rough to
phenomenal resulting in tidal flooding of low-lying areas. 
Efate and the capital, Port Vila 
Unless either the course or intensity of Ivy change in the next few hours, Port Vila is likely to receive moderate to severe
damage with isolated areas of catastrophic damage. Electricity is out over most of the island although phones are still
functioning in parts of Vila. NDMO has lost contact with almost all the Northern and Central Islands. It is likely that when
the eyewall passes over Vila, most communication facilities will be knocked out. With the entire country including the capital
impacted by this event, GOV and the people of Vanuatu will need serious assistance to coordinate the assessment and relief
efforts. 
Larger Northern and Central Vanuatu Islands 
The centre of Ivy is just to the south of Epi. Torrential rains and damaging Category 2-3 winds have been pounding Maewo,
Pentecost, Ambae, Santo, Ambrym and Malakula for 2 days and will continue for most of today although Santo and Banks
will soon be out of the main convection. Epi, the Shepherds and Efate will likewise be under the central core all day. The
slow moving nature of the storm mean that rainfalls in the hundreds of millimetres will have been registered throughout the
region and will be continuing. This will certainly be causing flash flooding of many stream valleys and larger rivers. The
situation in hill and mountain areas of Santo, Malakula, Ambae, Pentecost and Ambrym is of particular concern. as will be
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the high country on Erromango and Tanna. 
Larger Southern Vanuatu Islands 
The situation is now deteriorating in Erromango, Tanna and Anatom. The slow moving nature of the storm mean that
rainfalls in the hundreds of millimetres will have been registered throughout the region and will be continuing. This will
certainly be causing flash flooding of many stream valleys and larger rivers. The situation in hill and mountain areas of
Erromango and Tanna is of particular concern. 
GOV, NDMO and Donors should now prepare themselves for needing to make widespread assessments across almost all of
big islands Vanuatu in the following days. This may be difficult as Vila itself is now likely to be directly hit and experience
serious damage. In addition to flash flooding, coastal flooding and wind damage can be expected at least in localised areas
near the centre. 
Banks Group 
The centre of the storm is finally moving away from the Banks Group. However, heavy feeder band activity remains in the
south. The whole group has had very heavy rains, very rough seas and increasingly severe winds for almost 48 hours. With
the centre having slowly moved over Mere Lava, this outer island may be particularly hard hit. With the cyclone pulling away
from this Group, assessments should be done of the areas to determine the degree of wind damage and flooding. Crops are
likely badly affected in some areas. 
Anuta and Tikopia, Solomons 
Anuta and Tikopia are now out of the centre of the storm but unfortunately still continue in the inner feeder bands. Gales and
heavy rains should start subsiding in the next 6 hours and become more intermittent and less severe after this. Light to
moderate damage caused by tidal flooding of low-lying areas, crop damage and possibly some damage to unstable structures
is expected given the nearly 48 hours of punishment by this storm. However, the overall damage will not be anywhere as bad
as with Cyclone Zoe. However, the cumulative effects of 3 major cyclones in 14 months (Zoe, Gina and now Ivy) may well
be wearing down the ability of the people and their environment and its resources to sustainably cope. NDMO and Donors
should endeavour to make contact with the islands to assess both the immediate effects of Ivy and cumulative effects of the
last 3 storms on the overall situation. 
Torres Groups, Vanuatu and Santa Cruz Group, Solomons 
Inner feeder bands with heavy rains and squalls remain over Vanikolo. Seas remain very rough. The Torres Group, Vanikolo
and to a lesser extent Utupua have received very heavy rainfall from their proximity to this slow moving storm so some
flooding may have occurred. They should be assessed later today. The remainder of the Group has likely only experienced
minor coastal flooding, but contact to all the all the smaller outliers should be undertaken to verify this. 
General Alert 
Concerns in New Caledonia including the Loyalty Islands should continue to monitor this storm as it develops over the next
few days. Feeder bands will begin moving into the Loyalties in the next few hours. 
APCEDI will continue monitoring the event. More detailed information about the storm can be found on 
https://metoc.npmoc.navy.mil//jtwc.html
http://www.met.gov.fj/advisories.html
http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html
http://www.afap.org
http://www.afap.org/apcedi
 
Thanks to Job Esau, John Henry and Philip of the Vanuatu NDMO for all the information. 
Kevin Vang
APCEDI Coordinator 
APCEDI is a service of the Australian Foundation for the Peoples of Asia and the Pacific (AFAP) in Sydney, Australia and
the Foundation for the Peoples of the South Pacific International (FSPI) in Suva, Fiji. It is used primarily for internal FSP
information to provide information about affected areas with development projects in the AFAP, FSPI network in the Asia
Pacific Region.
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26 Feb 2004
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/143208
 
Vanuatu: APCEDI Cyclone Ivy Alert No. 13
Original published date:  26 Feb 2004
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    Asia-Pacific Centre for Emergency and Development Information   
Disaster type:  Tropical Cyclone
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Alert 13, Cyclone Ivy 13P / 26 February 2004, Sydney 0800 EDT
Cyclone Ivy remains a Category 2 storm and may be gaining increased strength today reaching Category 3. A large area of
deep convection remains at the centre of the storm. The central core of deep convection reaches from the Banks Group in the
north to Erromango in the south and covers all the large Northern Islands and adjacent islets including the capital Vila. The
centre of this core is now in the channel between Malakula and Ambrym. However instead of speeding up as forecasted, its
forward speed has actually slowed down, and Ivy is now moving at 4 knots to the south. 
Torrential rains continue over the southern Banks Group, Santo, Malakula, Maewo, Pentecost, Ambrym, Ambae, Epi the
Shepherds and Efate. Intermittent heavy rains are over the Erromango, Tanna and Anatom. Due to the slow forward speed of
Ivy, this torrential rainfall situation will continue today throughout Northern, Central and Southern Vanuatu. It should begin
to clear from the Banks Islands and Santo this morning and from the the other Northern Islands later this afternoon. Already
Cape Cumberland on Santo has just cleared from the central core area in the last hour. 
Inner feeder bands with severe gales and heavy rains continue to effect Anuta and Tikopia with more heavy rain moving into
Vanikolo, the rest of the Santa Cruz Group and the Torres Group. 
Most predictive models continue to forecast Ivy tracking southerly across the length of Vanuatu throughout the next 24-36
hours and then on to the east of New Caledonia. The official track out of the JTWC has Ivy moving over the Central Islands
today to just west of Vila this afternoon as a Category 2-3 storm and then on to the Loyalty Islands and New Caledonia
tomorrow as a Category 3. As such, the APCEDI warnings will continue all of Vanuatu from the Banks Group south and for
Anuta and Tikopia in the Solomons. The APCEDI alerts for the Santa Cruz Group and the Torres Group will be reinstated at
this time as heavy feeder band activity is strengthening over them as Ivy's movement slows. More heavy rain from feeder
bands is again entering this northern area today. If the eye feature maintains it current course, it will continue to pass to the
west of Epi and would be west of Vila in about 8-12 hours. 
The current situation is summarised as follows: 
Possible Damaging Category 2 Eyewall-strength Gales and Torrential Rains 
Vanuatu
Malakula
Ambrym
Epi
Damaging Sustained Category 2 Gales and Heavy Rain 
Vanuatu
Santo
Maewo
Pentecost
Ambae
Shepherd Islands
Efate (including the capital Vila)
Sustained Gales and Heavy Rain approaching damaging hurricane force in the next 6-10 hours 
Vanuatu
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Erromango
Tanna
Anatom
Intermittent Gales and Heavy Rain associated with Inner Feeder Bands (Storm now moving away)
Vanuatu
Banks Group
Torres Group
Solomons
Tikopia
Anuta
Santa Cruz Group
Given the continuing Category 2 nature of the storm, damage overall at this time should be moderate and localised. However,
the danger from flash-flooding remains extremely high as the storm creeps so slowly toward the south. As Ivy continues this
slow movement, very heavy widespread rainfall could result in flash-flooding of mountain and hill areas as well as known
flood prone areas. This is especially critical for the large Vanuatu islands. Due to the islands' very high relief and the slow
movement of the storm, flash flooding will be a major threat throughout tonight and tomorrow especially if the the storm
continues to pass slowly or even stalls. Locally severe damage will also likely occur near to the centre of the storm. Varying
degrees of crop damage are also likely. Seas will be very rough to phenomenal resulting in tidal flooding of low-lying areas.
If a central eye wall manages to re-emerge later today, and the storm strengthens, damage along its path will certainly be
more severe. 
Larger Vanuatu Islands 
The centre of Ivy is now between Malakula and Ambrym. Torrential rains and damaging Category 2 gales have been
pounding Maewo, Pentecost, Ambae, Santo, Ambrym and Malakula for 2 days and will continue for most of today although
Santo and Banks should soon be out of the main convection. Epi, the Shepherds and Efate will likewise be under the central
core all day. This core area moved into Efate overnight, and the situation is now deteriorating in Erromango, Tanna and
Anatom. The slow moving nature of the storm mean that rainfalls in the hundreds of millimetres will have been registered
throughout the region and will be continuing. This will certainly be causing flash flooding of many stream valleys and larger
rivers. The situation in hill and mountain areas of Santo, Malakula, Ambae, Pentecost and Ambrym is of particular concern.
This concern will extend to the Central and Southern Islands today and tomorrow. GOV, NDMO and Donors should now
prepare themselves for needing to make widespread assessments across almost all of big islands Vanuatu in the following
days. This may be difficult as Vila itself will be under the gun much of today. In addition to flash flooding, coastal flooding
and wind damage can be expected at least in localised areas near the centre. 
Efate and the Capital Vila 
Damage in Port Vila will depend very much on where the storm passes, the strength at the time of passage and the forward
speed. Most models are showing the centre of Ivy passing about 50-100 km west of Vila. This is close enough to cause
moderate to locally severe damage. If the storm centre reaches strong Category 2 -- Category 3 strength and passes close to or
over Vila, then damage could be severe to locally catastrophic. If the it passes further off the coast at a Category 2 level,
damage will be light to moderate. 
Banks Group 
The centre of the storm is finally moving away from Mere Lava and the rest of the Banks Group. However, heavy feeder
band activity remains across the Group. The whole group has had very heavy rains, very rough seas and increasingly severe
winds for almost 48 hours. With the centre having slowly moved over Mere Lava, this outer island may be particularly hard
hit. With the cyclone pulling away from this Group, assessments should be done of the areas to determine the degree of wind
damage and flooding. Crops are likely badly affected in some areas. 
Anuta and Tikopia, Solomons 
Anuta and Tikopia are now out of the centre of the storm but unfortunately still continue in the inner feeder bands. Gales and
heavy rains should start subsiding in the next 6 hours and become more intermittent and less severe after this. Light to
moderate damage caused by tidal flooding of low-lying areas, crop damage and possibly some damage to unstable structures
is expected given the nearly 48 hours of punishment by this storm. However, the overall damage will not be anywhere as bad
as with Cyclone Zoe. However, the cumulative effects of 3 major cyclones in 14 months (Zoe, Gina and now Ivy) may well
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be wearing down the ability of the people and their environment and its resources to sustainably cope. NDMO and Donors
should endeavour to make contact with the islands to assess both the immediate effects of Ivy and cumulative effects of the
last 3 storms on the overall situation. 
Torres Groups, Vanuatu and Santa Cruz Group, Solomons 
Inner feeder bands with heavy rains and squalls have actually regrouped and become more widespread over this area. Seas
remain very rough. The Torres Group, Vanikolo and to a lesser extent Utupua have received very heavy rainfall from their
proximity to this slow moving storm so some flooding may have occurred. They should be assessed later today. The
remainder of the Group has likely only experienced minor coastal flooding, but contact to all the all the smaller outliers
should be undertaken to verify this. 
General Alert 
Authorities in Vanuatu from the Banks Group to Anatom (including Torres and Banks Islands, Pentecost, Ambae, Santo,
Malakula, Ambrym, Paama, Ulveah, Epi, Shepherd Islands, Efate, Erromango, Tanna and Anatom including all small islands
in these areas) as well as Anuta and Tikopia in the Eastern Solomons should continue on alert, monitor the path of the storm
closely throughout tonight and tomorrow and take immediate actions to protect people and property. People in mountain
areas along the eastern and southern slopes of ranges should be on alert for heavy rain resulting in flash flooding. Low lying
coastal areas especially along east and southern parts of large islands should also be on alert for tidal flooding. 
Concerns in New Caledonia including the Loyalty Islands should continue to monitor this storm as it develops over the next
few days. 
APCEDI will continue monitoring the event. More detailed information about the storm can be found on 
https://metoc.npmoc.navy.mil//jtwc.html
http://www.met.gov.fj/advisories.html
http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html
http://www.afap.org
http://www.afap.org/apcedi
 
Thanks to Job Esau, John Henry and Philip of the Vanuatu NDMO for all the information. 
Kevin Vang
APCEDI Coordinator 
APCEDI is a service of the Australian Foundation for the Peoples of Asia and the Pacific (AFAP) in Sydney, Australia and
the Foundation for the Peoples of the South Pacific International (FSPI) in Suva, Fiji. It is used primarily for internal FSP
information to provide information about affected areas with development projects in the AFAP, FSPI network in the Asia
Pacific Region.
 
26 Feb 2004
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/143222
 
Vanuatu: APCEDI Cyclone Ivy Alert No. 16
Original published date:  26 Feb 2004
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    Asia-Pacific Centre for Emergency and Development Information   
Disaster type:  Tropical Cyclone
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Alert 16, Cyclone Ivy 13P / 26 February 2004, Sydney 2300 EDT
The interaction of the Ivy's eye with Efate seems to have weakened the storm down to a borderline Category 2-3. After
passing Efate the eye became indistinct and infilled. Now interaction with Erromango may further weaken the storm. A mass
of deep convection has formed to the west of the eye. Torrential rains and Category 2-3 winds continue over Efate,
Erromango and Tanna. Ivy's forward speed continues slow at 8 knots to the south. 
Intermittent heavy rains continue over the southern Southern Malakula, Ambrym, Epi the Shepherds and Anatom.
Intermittent showers are over Northern Malakula, Maewo, Pentecost and Ambae. Due to the slow forward speed of Ivy, this
torrential rainfall situation will continue tonight through Central and Southern Vanuatu. 
Most predictive models continue to forecast Ivy tracking southerly across the length of Vanuatu throughout the next 12 hours
and then on to the east of New Caledonia. The official track out of the JTWC has Ivy moving over the Southern Islands
tonight and then on to the Loyalty Islands and New Caledonia tomorrow as a Category 2 west of Tanna for 12 hours and then
declining thereafter. As such, the APCEDI warnings will continue all of Vanuatu from Santo south. The APCEDI alerts for
the Santa Cruz Group, the Torres Group and the Banks Group have now been lifted although isolated short-lived squalls will
still occur. If the eye feature maintains it current course, it will continue to pass over or just west of Tanna in 2-4 hours. 
The current situation is summarised as follows: 
Damaging Category 2-3 Eyewall-strength Winds and Torrential Rains 
Vanuatu
Tanna
Erromango
Damaging Gales and/ or Category 1-2 Winds and Torrential Rains (moving away) 
Vanuatu
Southern Malakula
Paama
Ulveah
Ambrym
Epi
Shepherds
Efate
Sustained Gales and Heavy Rain approaching damaging Category 2-3 force in the next 4-10 hours 
Vanuatu
Anatom
New Caledonia
Loyalty Islands
Intermittent Gales and Heavy Rain associated with Feeder Bands ( moving away) 
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Vanuatu
Maewo
Pentecost
Ambae
Santo
Northern and Central Malakula
Given the Category 2-3 nature of the storm, damage overall at this time should be widespread moderate to locally severe
from Efate on south. Widespread moderate and locally severe damage continues to the be reported from the capital Port Vila.
The danger from flash-flooding remains extremely high as the storm creeps so slowly toward the south. As Ivy continues this
slow movement, very heavy widespread rainfall could result in flash-flooding of mountain and hill areas as well as known
flood prone areas. This is especially critical for the large Vanuatu islands. Due to the islands' very high relief and the slow
movement of the storm, flash flooding will be a major threat throughout tonight and tomorrow especially if the the storm
continues to pass slowly or even stalls. Locally severe to catastrophic damage will also likely occur in and around the eye of
the storm. Varying degrees of crop damage are also likely. Seas will be very rough to phenomenal resulting in tidal flooding
of low-lying areas. 
Efate and the capital, Port Vila 
Efate is still in an area of deep convection with intermittent torrential rains and winds, but the eye has now moved south.
NDMO is reporting widespread moderate to localised severe damage in Vila as follows:
trees down blocking roads
power lines and poles down
large fishing boat capsized near the main wharf with a resulting oil spill
1700 people in evacuation shelters
power off in parts of Vila but on in other parts
phones mostly functioning
flooding of low-lying areas
some small bridges being washed out
With the entire country including the capital impacted by this event, GOV and the people of Vanuatu will need serious
assistance to coordinate the assessment and relief efforts. 
Larger Northern and Central Vanuatu Islands 
NDMO has established communications with some islands and have had the following reports which have not been
confirmed: 
Maewo - (radio contact)-many unstable and older houses damaged, newer more permanent houses largely withstanding
storm. 
Ambae -(radio contact)-many houses damaged. 
Ambrym -(telephone contact with west)-school severely damaged, many houses damaged. 
The centre of Ivy is now near Erromango. Torrential rains and damaging Category 2-3 winds have pounded Maewo,
Pentecost, Ambae, Santo, Ambrym and Malakula for 2 days and are subsiding tonight in most northern areas. Epi, the
Shepherds and Efate have been under the central core all day and this will continue into tonight, but later tonight conditions
will slowly improve from north to south. The slow moving nature of the storm means that rainfalls in the hundreds of
millimetres will have been registered throughout the region. Flooding from intermittent showers is still possible as all rivers
and streams are running high. 
Larger Southern Vanuatu Islands 
Ivy's center is near Erromango and will likely hit Tanna and Anatom later tonight. Widespread moderate to severe damage
can be expected. The slow moving nature of the storm mean that rainfalls in the hundreds of millimetres will have been
registered throughout the region and will be continuing. This will certainly be causing flash flooding of many stream valleys
and larger rivers. The situation in hill and mountain areas of Erromango and Tanna is of particular concern. 
GOV, NDMO and Donors should now prepare themselves for needing to make widespread assessments across almost all of
big islands Vanuatu in the following days. This may be difficult as Vila itself is now likely to be directly hit and experience
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serious damage. In addition to flash flooding, coastal flooding and wind damage can be expected at least in localised areas
near the centre. 
Banks Group 
The Banks Group is now out of the main storm area. However, outer feeder band activity is possible. The whole group has
had very heavy rains, very rough seas and increasingly severe winds for almost 48 hours. With the centre having slowly
moved over Mere Lava, this outer island may be particularly hard hit. With the cyclone pulling away from this Group,
assessments should be done of the areas to determine the degree of wind damage and flooding. Crops are likely badly
affected in some areas. 
Anuta and Tikopia, Solomons 
Anuta and Tikopia are now out of the main area of the storm but are still subject to outer feeder bands. Light to moderate
damage caused by tidal flooding of low-lying areas, crop damage and possibly some damage to unstable structures is
expected given the nearly 48 hours of punishment by this storm. However, the overall damage will not be anywhere as bad as
with Cyclone Zoe. However, the cumulative effects of 3 major cyclones in 14 months (Zoe, Gina and now Ivy) may well be
wearing down the ability of the people and their environment and its resources to sustainably cope. NDMO and Donors
should endeavour to make contact with the islands to assess both the immediate effects of Ivy and cumulative effects of the
last 3 storms on the overall situation. 
Torres Groups, Vanuatu and Santa Cruz Group, Solomons 
Outer feeder bands with heavy rains and squalls are still possible over Vanikolo. Seas remain very rough. The Torres Group,
Vanikolo and to a lesser extent Utupua have received very heavy rainfall from their proximity to this slow moving storm so
some flooding may have occurred. They should be assessed later today. The remainder of the Group has likely only
experienced minor coastal flooding, but contact to all the all the smaller outliers should be undertaken to verify this. 
Loyalty Islands, New Caledonia 
Inner feeder bands are now moving in and conditions should begin to deteriorate in the next 4-8 hours. 
General Alert 
Concerns in New Caledonia including the Loyalty Islands should continue to monitor this storm as it develops over the next
few days. Feeder bands will begin moving into the Loyalties in the next few hours. 
APCEDI will continue monitoring the event. More detailed information about the storm can be found on 
https://metoc.npmoc.navy.mil//jtwc.html
http://www.met.gov.fj/advisories.html
http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html
http://www.afap.org
http://www.afap.org/apcedi
 
Thanks to Job Esau, John Henry and Philip of the Vanuatu NDMO for all the information. 
Kevin Vang
APCEDI Coordinator 
APCEDI is a service of the Australian Foundation for the Peoples of Asia and the Pacific (AFAP) in Sydney, Australia and
the Foundation for the Peoples of the South Pacific International (FSPI) in Suva, Fiji. It is used primarily for internal FSP
information to provide information about affected areas with development projects in the AFAP, FSPI network in the Asia
Pacific Region.
 
26 Feb 2004
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ReliefWeb report — 
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Vanuatu: Vanuatu - Hail, Landslides and Flooding OCHA Situation
Report No. 1
 
  Original published date:    06 Jan 2003   
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Theme:    Recovery and Reconstruction   
Content format:  Situation Report
  Language:    English   
  Source:    UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs   
  Disaster type:    Tropical Cyclone   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Ref: OCHA/GVA - 2003/0002
OCHA Situation Report No. 1
Vanuatu - Hail, Landslides and Flooding
Occurred: 21-24 December 2002 
This situation report is based on information provided by the Vanuatu National Disaster Management Office (NDMO),
through the office of the OCHA Regional Disaster Response Adviser for the Pacific. 
Situation and Damage 
1. From 21 to 24 December 2002, heavy rain with hail - a very unusual phenomenon in these latitudes - fell on the southern
Tanna Island; from Ipeukel on the Southeast Coast to Green Point in the South. Tanna is one of three main islands in Tafea,
the southernmost province of Vanuatu. 
2. According to reports from the NDMO, the rain and hail caused a number of large landslides and flash-flooding along many
of the creeks and rivers, damaging farmland around Imaki and Isiai villages, the areas west of Whitesand and around Port
Resolution. The majority of roads in these areas were blocked and some bridges were washed away, reducing access by
vehicle and even by foot. Port Resolution is still cut off. Telephone lines were also cut and many villages now lack
communications; from Ipeukel to Imaki the telecommunications network is completely destroyed. 
3. According to the NDMO, over 3,000 people were affected, but there were no fatalities and only one injury, to an expatriate
who broke her leg and whose husband had to be rescued from the debris of their home by neighbours. The water supply
system is reported to be badly damaged by floods and landslides, and people now have to resort to surface water sources that
may be contaminated. The worst damage appears to have been done to agriculture; as the rain, hail and flooding destroyed
almost all village gardens in the Southeast, and a fifth of those from Imaki to Green Point on the South Coast. These gardens
are the main source of subsistence food and of cash through market sales and, due to the loss of topsoil, it will take 6 months
to restore their productivity. 
Response to Date 
4. Tafea Provincial Government and the NDMO deployed a damage and needs assessment team to the affected areas on
Saturday 28 December 2002 to enable the authorities to prioritise the population's immediate relief needs, and to prepare a
longer-term recovery plan by end-January 2003. The team returned to Port Vila on 2 January 2003, to submit its report and
recommendations. The Public Works Department is also conducting a detailed assessment of the damage done to
infrastructure, to form part of the provincial report. The Rural Water Supply Unit and the Health Department are preparing an
awareness programme on health risks, for implementation during the emergency and recovery phases, and Telecom Vanuatu
will take steps to start restoring lines shortly. 
5. In the meantime communities are responding within their means, and unaffected villages in West Tanna are sharing what
surplus food and other resources they have, with those in the south and south-east. Families from the island and Tafea
Province living in Port Vila are also making small donations. 
6. The Government of Vanuatu is currently preparing a response plan that will be finalised when the assessment report has
been received and analysed. Donor partners have been alerted by the NDMO, and are awaiting specific requests to support
the national response. The only international assistance requested and received so far was for a helicopter, provided by the
Government of France from New Caledonia, to conduct aerial reconnaissance of the affected areas. 
Projected Evolution 
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7. At this stage, the NDMO suggests that the affected communities need a limited amount of supplementary food assistance,
household water containers, hand and power tools for clearing debris, materials for repairing and rebuilding their homes, and
vegetable seedlings for replanting. Technical assistance will also be needed for the restoration of the roads and bridges, the
water supply, and communications networks. The assessment report by the NDMO will quantify the assistance needed. 
8. The damage to agriculture and the restricted access to some communities indicate that there may be localised food
shortages over the coming weeks and months. There are also concerns about the reduction in the availability of potable water
and, with it, the increased possibility of waterborne diseases. The safe water / health awareness programme will address this
issue, and a similar awareness programme coordinated by the Department of Agriculture will look at food security.
Community economic losses will have longer-term effects on school attendance and on the general prosperity of the island,
which should also be monitored by the Government. Finally, service delivery must be ensured through the emergency and
recovery periods, in spite of the difficulties caused by the damage to roads, telecommunications, and other infrastructure. 
9. The office of the OCHA Regional Disaster Response Adviser is in contact with the NDMO in Vanuatu and will revert with
further information as it becomes available. 
10. This situation report, together with information on other ongoing emergencies, is also available on the OCHA Internet
Website at http://www.reliefweb.int 
Telephone: +41-22-917 12 34
Fax: +41-22-917 00 23
E-mail: ochagva@un.org 
In case of emergency only: Tel. +41-22-917 20 10 
Ms. S. deSouza / Mr. S. Nakajima Direct Tel. +41-22-917 16 36 / 40 34 
Press contact:
(in GVA) - Ms. Elizabeth Byrs, direct Tel. +41-22-917 26 53
(in N.Y.) - Mr. Brian Grogan, direct Tel. +1-212-963 11 43
 
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
06 Jan 2003
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ReliefWeb report — 
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Vanuatu: Vanuatu - Earthquake OCHA Situation Report No. 1
Original published date:  11 Dec 2002
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs   
Disaster type:  Earthquake
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Ref: OCHA/GVA - 2002/0231
OCHA Situation Report No. 1
Vanuatu - Earthquake
11 December 2002 
This situation report is based on information provided by the Vanuatu National Disaster Management Office (NDMO),
through the office of the OCHA Regional Disaster Response Advisor for the Pacific. 
Situation and Damage 
1. A strong earthquake hit the northern province of Vanuatu, Torba, on Tuesday 28 November 2002. According to the United
States Geological Survey, the earthquake measured 5.9 on the Richter scale with its epicentre estimated at latitude 14.38
degrees south and longitude 167.78 degrees east (in the sea approximately 145 km north-northeast of Luganville town on
Santo). Its origin time was 16.43 hrs GMT on 27 November 2002, or 03.43 hrs local time on 28 November. Aftershocks up to
Magnitude 5.2 struck the same area over the next 24 hours. 
2. The earthquake affected Merelava in the South Banks Group, a small island with a population of 1,143 in 5 villages. Only
3 people suffered minor injuries and the clinic on the island is still operating. However, landslide debris is blocking the one
road that links the villages, restricting access to the clinic, particularly for expectant mothers and old people. 
3. According to the NDMO assessment report, the earthquake damaged nearly 100 buildings including 3 churches and all 3
primary schools on the island. Aside from the damage to housing, the worst impact was on gardening areas due to landslides
caused by the earthquake. The main staples are taro, manioc and banana, and it is feared that the root crops will have been
damaged by the shaking. The main source of cash income was copra, and the landslides have also destroyed some of the
coconut palms. Normal water sources are underground wells, surface water catchment works, and household storage tanks.
23 out of 29 of these systems are reported to be destroyed or damaged. 
Response 
4. An aerial and ground assessment was conducted by officials from the NDMO and the Department of Geology, and the
chief government representative on Merelava on 2 December. The Health Department has provided the boat from another
clinic for use during the response operation, and medical supplies to restock the clinic. The RVS Tukoro (a patrol boat) was
also deployed to assist by providing reliable communications back to Port Vila, and to repair the radio in the island clinic.
Aside from the provision of a helicopter for the assessment mission, the Government of Vanuatu has supplied 200 litres of
fuel and 69 tarpaulins. Communities from Torba and Merelava living in Port Vila have also made voluntary contributions of
food. 
5. Immediate needs indicated in the assessment report are tarpaulins, water containers, cement for repairs to water supply
systems, seeds, tools, and food. Some supplementary food may be required from mid-December for a period of three months. 
6. The National Disaster Committee (NDC) met on 2 December, and the NDMO recommended in its assessment report that
Merelava be declared a disaster zone. Another NDC meeting is to be convened on Friday 13 December to consider the
possibility of making such a declaration. To date, however, the Government of the Vanuatu has not yet declared a state of
emergency nor requested any international assistance. 
7. The office of the OCHA Regional Disaster Response Adviser is in contact with the NDMO in Vanuatu and is monitoring
the situation. This is the first and final OCHA report on this disaster unless other critical information emerges. 
8. This situation report, together with information on other ongoing emergencies, is also available on the OCHA Internet
Website at http://www.reliefweb.int 
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Telephone: +41-22-917 12 34
Fax: +41-22-917 00 23
E-mail: ochagva@un.org 
In case of emergency only: Tel. +41-22-917 20 10 
Mr. R. Mueller / Mr. S. Nakajima
Direct Tel. +41-22-917 31 31 / 40 34 
Press contact:
(in GVA) - Ms. Elizabeth Byrs, direct Tel. +41-22-917 26 53
(in N.Y.) - Mr. Brian Grogan, direct Tel. +1-212-963 11 43
 
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
11 Dec 2002
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ReliefWeb report — 
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Vanuatu: Vanuatu: Preliminary report: Earthquake and tsunami
damage assessment in Port Vila
 
  Original published date:    22 Jan 2002   
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
Language: English
  Source:    South Pacific Applied Geoscience Commission   
  Disaster type:    Earthquake   
  Origin notes:       
  
  
SOPAC Preliminary Report 135
Dr G. G. Shorten, SOPAC
Background
On Thursday 3rd January 2002, a magnitude Mw 7.1 earthquake, the largest recorded so far in the vicinity, struck Port Vila
(Figure 1). Although a significant event, it was by no means the largest possible in this setting. Estimates of maximum
possible seismicity sit around magnitude 7.8.
The shock occurred at 04:22 am local time (UTC 2002/01/02 17:22:50), only 50 km to the west of Port Vila and at the
shallow depth of 21 km below the sea floor. Fifteen minutes after the main shock, a tsunami (Figure 2) struck Port Vila
Harbour. The event was followed that same night by another large aftershock of magnitude Mw 6.4 which also produced a
tsunami, though much smaller.
The following day, the Director of SOPAC made a plea for international coordination of scientific and engineering
assessments, and volunteered SOPAC as the reference point for information on the event. A SOPAC assessment team was
readied and dispatched to Port Vila on Tuesday 8th January, and will remain there until 24th January, to obtain details of
damage. The team has already consulted widely in Vanuatu: A list of persons and organisations with which meetings,
discussions and inspections were held between 8th-13th of January is appended.
The UK Department For International Development (DFID) Suva responded rapidly and favourably to an approach and
request from SOPAC, providing the much-needed funding for the assessment to take place.
Damage to the city and to southeast Efate in general was surprisingly light, although several bridges were destroyed and
much cracking in concrete structures and superficial damage was recorded (Figure 3). The tsunami that struck Port Vila
Harbour some 15 minutes after the first shock, was fortunately small enough, given the low tide at the time, not to cause any
significant flooding above Highest Astronomical Tide level.
The majority of buildings fared well in the earthquake, and the most of the damage appears to be the result of either ground
failure or inadequate structural design. Although the full extent of damage is still being assessed, earthquake damage
currently falls into several categories:
Significant structural damage
Superficial building damage
Foundation failure
Slope failure
See the in pdf * format (1.77 MB) 
* Get 
Adobe Acrobat Viewer
 (free)
 
22 Jan 2002
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SOPAC Preliminary Report 135
1
Preliminary Report
Earthquake and Tsunami Damage Assessment in Port Vila
January 2002
Dr G. G. Shorten
SOPAC
Background
On Thursday 3
rd
 January  2002, a magnitude Mw 7.1 earthquake, the largest recorded  so far in the
vicinity, struck  Port Vila (Figure 1).  Although a significant event, it was by no means the largest 
possible in this setting. Estimates of maximum possible seismicity sit around magnitude 7.8
Figure 1:  Historical seismicity of Vanuatu; mag. 7 and larger since 1900
The shock  occurred at  04:22 am
local 
time (UTC
2002/01/02
17:22:50), only 50 km to  the west
of Port Vila and at the shallow
depth of 21 km below the sea floor.
Fifteen minutes
after the
main
shock, a  tsunami  (Figure 2)  struck
Port Vila Harbour. The event was 
followed that same night by
another large aftershock of
magnitude Mw 6.4 which also
produced a tsunami, though much 
smaller.
The following day, the Director of 
SOPAC made a
plea for
international
coordination of
scientific
and engineering
assessments, 
and volunteered
SOPAC as  the reference point for 
information on the event. A SOPAC 
assessment team was readied and 
dispatched to Port Vila  on Tuesday 
8
th
 January, and  will remain there
until 24
th
 January, to obtain details 
of damage. The team  has already 
consulted widely in Vanuatu: A list 
of persons and organisations with which  meetings, discussions and inspections were held  between
8
th
-13
th
of January is appended.
The UK Department For International Development (DFID) Suva responded rapidly and favourably to 
an approach  and request  from  SOPAC, providing  the much-needed funding for the assessment to 
take place.
Damage to the city and to southeast 
Efate in general was surprisingly light,
although
several
bridges were
destroyed and much cracking
in
concrete structures and superficial
damage was recorded  (Figure 3). The
tsunami that struck Port Vila Harbour 
some 15 minutes after the  first shock,
was fortunately small enough, given 
the low tide at the time, not to cause 
any significant flooding above Highest 
Astronomical Tide level.
Figure 2: NTF tide gauge record of the tsunami in Port Vila Harbour
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SOPAC Preliminary Report 135
2
Figure 3: Locality map of Port Vila area showing areas of major damage
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SOPAC Preliminary Report 135
3
The majority of buildings fared well in the earthquake, and the most of the damage appears to be the 
result of either ground failure or inadequate structural design. Although the full extent of damage is still 
being assessed, earthquake damage currently falls into several categories:
Significant structural damage
Superficial building damage
Foundation failure
Slope failure
Significant Structural Damage
Significant structural damage occurred  t o the Lycee Bouganville where a 3-storey school classroom
building was severely damaged, displaying short-column failure concentrated at the top of the infill 
walls throughout the entire  ground floor level (Figure 4), an adjacent dormitory block suffered similar, 
significant structural damage, and a 2-storey classroom block reached the stage of incipient failure. 
The school buildings are built on 
a cut and filled  slope.  Damage
consistently increases from
upper to lower floors. The
pattern of failure suggests that 
the fixity of the ground-floor infill
walls has concentrated stresses
and promoted shear failure in
the short, lower-floor columns. 
The design strength of the
concrete has been exceeded,
possibly due to poor concrete
mix characteristics. A retrofitting
program should be undertaken 
without delay  for this particular
design
(where not already
condemned) especially in the
case where they are used as
public school buildings.
Figure 4:  Short columns spalled and failed, ground floor, Lycee Bouganville
Unreinforced concrete blocks set in a
checkerboard pattern in the stairwell spaces  of
the Lycee buildings
(Figure 5) have failed
catastrophically, highlighting a dangerous and
unnecessary construction practice. The blocks 
should be removed  immediately and replaced by 
alternative materials.
The neighbouring 3-storey section of the Ministry 
of Education building was damaged in a very 
similar fashion to the 3-storey classroom block at 
the Lycee.
Figure 5:  Infill blockwork in stairwells sheared and collapsed
The 3-storey Au Bon Marche in No.2 district was badly damaged  (Figure 6) 
through column failure, probably due to inadequate foundation  floor beams.
The building housing the Australian and British High Commissions suffered 
thoroughgoing  cracks in piers on the eastern side, as well as significant 
distress in internal infill walls. The degradation of concrete in the under
surface of the lower floor due to the placement of reinforcing too close to that 
surface does  not engender confidence in the construction practices used in 
that building. Eyewitnesses in this same building reported the toppling of
shelves during some of the larger aftershocks; a feature not reported
elsewhere.
Figure 6:  Damage around ground-floor columns at Au Bon Marche
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SOPAC Preliminary Report 135
4
Superficial Building Damage
A large number of buildings suffered minor structural damage, including shearing of infill walls and
window breakage. The full extent of damage is currently being compiled and will be published as a 
joint Department of Geology and Mines-SOPAC-IRD report, providing earthquake details, effects and 
damage, all geo-located on the SOPAC Pacific Cities Risk-GIS database.
Foundation Failure
Movement of the sea wall during the 
main shock has led to some
permanent deformation to seaward
and subsidence of the foreshore in
reclaimed areas around the Central 
Business District. The worst affected 
area runs for some 150 m from the 
open park area north of the main
public Market (Figure 7), southward
through the seaward end of the
Market building and car park and then 
through the seaward end of the Sea 
View Restaurant/Bon Marche in a 25 
m-wide zone adjacent to the sea wall.
Figure 7:  Fissuring in back-fill behind sea wall, north of Market
This has led to the subsidence and tilting of the Sea View Restaurant, detaching it away and rotating it 
to seawards from the main Bon Marche building, and causing significant 
distress and cracking to structural columns and beams throughout the
restaurant. Similarly, the toilet block on the seaward end of the Market 
(Figure 8) has detached 150 mm away from the main structure.  It is likely 
that both structures are founded directly on fill in an inherently unstable 
area.
Figure 8:  Detached Market toilet block
The ground distress also extends
into the floor slab up to the first 
row of columns of the main market 
where the first (westernmost) slab 
construction joint has opened up. 
Between the public Market and the 
restaurant, the concrete slabs of 
the car park have also opened up 
some 50-100 mm on construction joints (Figure 9) due to the 
same cause.
Figure 9:  Car park slabs opened south of Market
Subsidence and rotation of the sea wall has also occurred further south in the vicinity of the Waterfront 
Bar (Figure 10).
Fissures that opened in 
filled ground behind the 
sea wall there reportedly 
issued water under high 
pressure.
A gap of around 20 mm 
is present between the 
concrete sea wall and
backfill in much of the
reclaimed area around
the CBD (Figure 11).
Figure 10: Ground fissures and tilted sea wall near Waterfront Bar
Figure 11:  Gap between sea wall and back-fill
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SOPAC Preliminary Report 135
5
The Teuma Bridge (Figure 12) to the southeast of the city has 
suffered significant structural damage as a result of the shearing of 
the eastern pier set/pile cap due to a rotational soil failure in the 
eastern abutment. The bridge 
superstructure has shifted
eastward and tilted down to
the east, causing some tilting 
of the western pier set as well. 
Soil failure due to liquefaction 
is also apparent in the
western approach.
Figure 13: Embankment failure, Mele  Bridge
The PWD has plans in hand to drive new piles, re-establish the level 
of the superstructure and
repair the piers.
Figure 12:  Damaged Teuma Bridge
Both the  Mele (Figure 13)  and Prima Bridges to the northwest 
of Port Vila have been affected by failure of their approach
embankments and
abutments due to liquefaction in the
underlying alluvial  soils (Figure 14), although the main bridge 
structure in both cases is considered by the PWD to be sound.
Figure 14:  Slumping due to liquefaction, Prima Bridge
Fissures in the 
roadway and
underlying
embankment
fill (Figure 15)
opened up to
500 mm wide
with depths in
excess of a
metre in places.
Figure 15: Embankment failure, Prima Bridge
Slope Failure
A number of large landslides occurred on the access road to the main wharf at the southern end of 
Port Vila Harbour (Figure 16).
The geology of Port Vila is
characterised by a thick series 
of weak volcanic tuffs capped 
by a cemented limestone
some tens of metres thick. The 
slope failures in the wharf road 
were principally in the weaker 
tuffs although undercutting of 
the top of the cliff  has brought
down significant blocks of
limestone as well (Figure 17).
Failures in the tuff have been 
variously
initiated on
wide
shear zones, areas where the
layering dips out of the cliff
face, and also within fossil
gullies 
containing weak
colluvial material.
Figure 16: Massive slope failure in tuff above Wharf access road
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SOPAC Preliminary Report 135
6
Whereas the interface between the  tuff and overlying limestone  lies high in the cliff face on the city 
side of the harbour, it dips towards the west 
so that  it lies within several metres of sea 
level on the western margin of the peninsula.
Accordingly, the slope failures have been
concentrated in the  tuff composing the  cliff
face above the southeastern part of the
harbour with very few in the southwest where 
the cliff face is almost entirely composed of 
limestone.
Figure 17: Toppled limestone boulder puncturing road surface
The fill in the roadway to the wharf has fissured and failed in
numerous places (Figure 18). The security of the wharf
access road is a key issue requiring further geotechnical
investigation and remedial work.
Figure 18:  Road embankment collapse, Wharf road
Significantly, the one catastrophic slope failure that did occur in the west of the peninsula (Figure 19) 
was in the
area
between Pango and
Watarua-Paradise
Cove 
where
prior
erosion of the tuff had 
undercut the overlying 
limestone. Shortly
after the major shock, 
a
section of the
cantilevered
limestone, including
one house-sized block
of limestone of about 
75 m
3
, toppled  from
the 10 m high cliff line 
to partially demolish a 
modern
concrete
bungalow used as a
reception area for  the
Pango Resort.
Figure 19:  Toppling failure from the cliff face behind Pango Resort
At Klem’s Hill, a significant slope failure occurred both within 
the roadway fill  (Figure 20)  and in the tuff forming the  cut
slope above. Inspection of other, smaller failures nearby
suggest that shear planes dipping out of the face may have 
led to the failure in this area. The road is excessively steep
and remains vulnerable to such failures in  the future. The
short-term fix of cutting the roadway deeper into the hillside 
may not prove a long-term solution. Apparently a less
precipitous route to the west around Devil’s Point is under 
consideration.
Figure 20:  Road embankment collapse, Klem’s Hill
Tsunami
A tsunami generated with the earthquake struck Port Vila Harbour some 15 minutes later according to 
records of the  National Tidal Facility  supplied by Bill Mitchell  through the Acting Director of the 
Vanuatu Meteorological Office.
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SOPAC Preliminary Report 135
7
Figure 21:  Tsunami record, Port Vila Wharf – differences between observed and predicted sea level
Although the
tsunami only
registered on the 
tide  gauge as
having a crest to
trough amplitude 
of 0.8 m (Figure 
21),
eyewitness
accounts in
different parts  of
the harbour put
the maximum
effect at around
3.0
m (Figure
22),
several
times that of  the
recorded height,
making it large
enough to cause significant damage.
Figure 22:  Eyewitness account of the tsunami effects around Port Vila Harbour
Predictive tsunami modelling carried out by Vasily Titov and the Pacific Disaster Center, Hawaii as
part of the Port Vila Pacific Cities project prior to the actual event, confirms that such amplifications are
likely due to resonance and interference effects within the harbour (Figure 23). A video-animation of
the simulated tsunami  in Port Vila harbour, based on  the scenario of  a  larger, M 8.2 earthquake
occurring in a similar location, is available from SOPAC.
Fortunately the tsunami occurred at a time close to one of the very lowest tides of the year (predicted 
CD+0.15 m), when the tide was close to Chart Datum. If the earthquake had occurred four hours later 
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SOPAC Preliminary Report 135
8
at high tide (CD+1.35 m), flooding would have reached up to 1 metre over the top of the sea wall in the 
CBD area. A much smaller tsunami occurred  following the major aftershock that night, but passed 
unnoticed.
Figure 23:  Model of tsunami heights in Port Vila Harbour based on tide gauge record
Press Reports
One of the most disturbing
features following the
earthquake
was the
local
Trading Post publication (albeit
with strong reservations) of the
views of a disturbed water-
diviner cum prophet-of-doom
who predicted a much larger 
earthquake later in January.
Most residents of Port Vila
quite emotionally shaken by
the earthquake, and this so-
called prediction fed
that
general sense of unease.
Given that that  expert advice 
was available, it was
irresponsible for the Trading
Post to even put those views 
into print at that time.
Summary
Although of large magnitude, 
the earthquake that struck Port 
Vila on 3
rd
 January, 2002,
occurred far enough to the
west of Efate so that
attenuation of the effects
through the intervening crust
and
sea floor was
great
enough to ensure
that
relatively little damage was
caused in Port Vila and the
surrounding area. The great
majority of buildings escaped 
with little more than superficial 
damage. Buildings that were
seriously damaged either had 
serious design or  construction 
flaws or were founded on  fill or 
reclaimed land that subsided 
due to liquefaction or other soil 
failure phenomena. The bridge 
and approach embankments  failures in the Port Vila  area were mainly due to  a combination of  the
high liquefaction potential of saturated, fine-grained alluvium, and the construction of embankments
high enough to cope with flood conditions. Slope failure was almost entirely confined to  volcanic tuff in 
high cliff faces, although the overlying limestone was involved in consequent landslides.
A tsunami of significant size was generated  with the earthquake  and, although it  may have gone
unnoticed by those not living by the harbour, had the potential to cause much  flooding, damage and 
perhaps loss of life had it struck on a high, rather than an extremely low, tide as it did.
The potential for Port Vila to experience similar, or even significantly worse, earthquakes and tsunamis
can be considered relatively high in the 50-100 year timeframe –  this  was not an isolated or
unexpected event.
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SOPAC Preliminary Report 135
9
Conclusions
SOPAC has been accumulating information on population demographics, infrastructure vulnerability 
and property values and the likely intensity of natural and human-induced hazards on the Port Vila 
area for the  past five years in its Pacific Cities program. Currently, it is undertaking a pilot study on 
Port Vila to determine the most apt form of catastrophe insurance that might be applied in this 
developing-country situation, as well as community vulnerability assessments in the peri-urban area 
that involve the perceptions of local communities of their own vulnerability and resilience.
Pacific Cities aims to collate  all data relevant to urban planning and risk assessment on a single  GIS
database, including  hazard information, subsurface data, physical  and survey information, building, 
infrastructure and life-line information, census data, insurance information, planning and development 
data and much more.
The immediate result of  the work undertaken to date  is that it is easier to identify and map building 
damage from the current event as every building in Port Vila is registered on the database
The information base enables modelling and prediction of the effects of  tsunamis and storm surges 
knowing the bathymetry of harbour and the detailed heights of potential flood areas onshore, and the 
effects of cyclonic winds over the land areas. In this case, the effects of the current tsunami were able
to be predicted with  reasonable accuracy. Furthermore, the actual recorded effects of the tsunami will 
be incorporated back into the model to ensure better predictions  of consequence and likelihood  in
future.
The earthquake microzoning  undertaken earlier  will be modified as a result of the lessons learned
from this event, but significantly the predictions from that work that widespread foundation failure could 
be expected in the appropriately zoned areas, was borne out in practice.
The Pacific Cities project also seeks to  gather together all  geotechnical subsurface information and
boreholes in  Port Vila as it has done in other cities, which is a critical first step to assess the 
geotechnical performance of embankments on alluvium and reclaimed land.
The SOPAC Applied Community Vulnerability project  funded through  further UK DFID  extends this 
work into peri-urban areas like Blacksands and, furthermore, takes into account the community’s own 
assessment of their vulnerability in proposing concrete solutions.
The World Bank Catastrophe Insurance Project funded by AusAID is using  the information gathered 
for Port Vila as a pilot project to form an economic model in order to assess how Vanuatu in particular,
and the Pacific Islands in general, might fund recovery from such disasters.
All of this effort, together with a concerted program to build the capabilities of the National Disaster 
Managers Office has resulted in a significant increase in the awareness of the local scientific, disaster 
response and lay communities of the risk facing the conurbation of Port Vila.
Recommendations
A program to  identify and  retrofit/modify suspect public buildings, especially schools, is considered
critical.  The performance of the sea wall  structure and associated reclaimed area in the CBD, and 
buildings founded thereupon, should be assessed and  improvements made. Slope hazard mapping is
necessary for major and significant  access roads  (especially the Wharf road) to identify the risk to 
critical transport routes and lifelines, and to treat that risk with suitable options. A geotechnical 
investigation program is needed  to improve performance of embankments over  liquefiable soils, and 
road embankments and reclaimed areas on the margins of the harbour.
It is critical that support be given to the  Pacific Cities concept both in  terms of  support for predictive 
modelling of earthquake, tsunami, storm surge and wind hazard, and in terms of wholehearted support 
for the program from  Government  Departments and private organisations  through freely providing 
information for all aspects of urban planning to be incorporated on the Risk-GIS database.
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SOPAC Preliminary Report 135
10
Persons/Organisations - Meetings, Discussions and Inspections between 8
th
-13
th
 of January
SOPAC wishes to express its appreciation to the following people for  agreeing at short notice to 
provide information and hold extensive  discussions on the event:
Mr Chris Ioan, Director, Department of Geology, Mines and Water Resources
Mr Job Esau, Head, National Disaster Managers Office
Mr Michael Mangawai, Acting Director-General, Ministry of Lands Mines and Natural Resources
Dr Marc Regnier, Seismologist, IRD Noumea
Mr Goeff McConnell, First Secretary, Development Cooperation, AusAID, Port Vila
Ms Victoria Hillman, Senior Program Officer, AusAID, Port Vila
HE Mr Michael Hill, British High Commissioner, British High Commission Vila
Mr Nick Duggin, DFID, Port Vila
Mr Richie  Nichols, Project Engineer, PWD Vanuatu
HE Mr Brian Smythe, New Zealand High Commissioner, Vanuatu
Ms Elizabeth Wilson, Deputy High Commissioner, New Zealand High Commission, Port Vila
Mr Sergei Terzaghi, Sinclair Knight Merz, Auckland
Mr Geoff Hales, Project Engineer, PWD Vanuatu
Mr Bae Williams, Forecaster, Department of Meteorology
Mr Kevin Lindsay, RISKMAN, Vanuatu
Mr Alastair Rodger, AON Risk Services, Port Vila
Mr Tony Kanas, Surveyor, Department of Lands & Survey
Members of Blacksands Community
Members of Blacksands and Ifira Communities
Disclaimer
SOPAC has attempted to ensure that the information in this report is as accurate as possible. 
However, it does not guarantee that this information is totally accurate and complete. Therefore you 
should not rely solely on this information when making commercial decisions.
Acknowledgments
The author wishes to acknowledge the permission of the Government of Vanuatu to publish this 
information, and specifically the assistance of the DG of Lands & Natural Resources and SOPAC 
National Representative Michael Mangawai, the staff of the Department of Geology, Mines & Water 
Resources including Director Chris Ioan, Morris Stephen and Eslin for their assistance, Tony Kanas of 
the Department of Lands & Survey, the Acting Director of the Vanuatu Meteorological Office Jotham 
Napat for permission to use information from the Port Vila tide gauge, the team performing damage 
surveys, and the cooperation of Job Esau, NDMO. The author also wishes  to acknowledge the 
assistance of Marc Regnier and his team from IRD, Noumea in providing information on seismological 
aspects, and to SOPAC members Monika Swamy and Purnima Naidu for their part in the
investigations, and the National Tidal Facility in Adelaide, Vasily Titov, and Stan Goosby, PDC Hawaii 
for tsunami information. Funding for the  investigation, damage assessment and follow-up work  was 
kindly supplied by UK DFID Suva
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ReliefWeb report — 
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Vanuatu: Vanuatu: Earthquake information bulletin No. 02/02
Original published date:  07 Jan 2002
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Appeal, Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    IFRC   
Disaster type:  Earthquake
  Origin notes:       
  
  
This Information Bulletin is for information only. The Federation is not seeking any funding or other assistance from donors
for this operation at this time. Vanuatu is covered by the Pacific's regional appeal 01.40/02.
The Situation 
Aftershocks continue to frighten the population of Vanuatu's main island of Efate after the strongest earthquake for seven
years, measuring 7.3 on the Richter scale, rocked the Pacific island nation on 3 January 2002. The latest tremor was felt at
6am local time on 5 January. People have been warned of further aftershocks and advised to move out of vulnerable
structures and take precautions. 
There have been no report of serious casualties but the earthquake caused major damage to buildings and infrastructure.
Many buildings in the capital, Port Vila - including those of the Ministry of Education, Lycee Antoine de Bouganville School
as well as factories and shops - are unsafe. The Teoma bridge, which links the southern coast of Efate to the capital, has been
destroyed. Three bridges linking Port Vila to North Efate (Mele, Prima and La Colle bridges), including the vulnerable
low-lying communities near Mele Bay, have been seriously damaged. Landslides blocked the road to the main wharf, buried
a steep road in Klems Hill area and also damaged some crops. Heavy rain - a possibility as cyclone season is until April - or
further aftershocks could cause more landslides, especially on the western hillsides of Efate. Supplies of power, water and
telecommunications have been interrupted. 
Red Cross/Red Crescent Action 
The Vanuatu Red Cross Society's (VRCS) Operation Centre is still being run from a tent in the VRCS Headquarters
compound as the office building was damaged. The Red Cross response has so far focused on medical assistance for those
who suffered minor injuries, psychological support for people in shock, and provision of shelter for families who cannot
return to their homes. 
A VRCS disaster response team of 11 volunteers, trained in first aid and disaster response, was deployed immediately after
the earthquake to Port Vila as well as Mele, Melemaat, Blacksands, and Erangorango, the most vulnerable communities in the
low-lying flood plain area. All VRCS staff and volunteers based on Efate are on 24-hour standby. 
Fear of a tsunami following the earthquake prompted 500 people from low-lying areas to flee to higher ground 2 km from
their homes. However, the Department of Geology and Mines has ruled out a tsunami risk at present, and the Vanuatu
National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) is broadcasting safety information to assure the evacuees that the situation is
under control. VRCS has provided man-to-man counselling to build confidence and avoid panic among evacuees. It has
provided transportation for over 190 people to return to their homes. VRCS has set up five tents to provide temporary shelters
for those in fear of returning to unsafe homes. 
VRCS will continue to be on alert to monitor possible water contamination and food problems as well as further shelter needs
after future aftershocks or heavy rain. It is maintaining close contact with the NDMO and community leaders in vulnerable
areas. 
For a full description of the National Society profile, see 
www.ifrc.org
 
For further details please contact: 
The Regional Delegation for the Pacific in Suva, Fiji; Phone 679 311855; Fax 679 311406; email ifrcfj00@ ifrc.org. 
Satoshi Sugai, Phone 4l 22 7304-273; Fax 4l 22 733 0395; email sugai@ifrc.org 
All International Federation Operations seek to adhere to the Code of Conduct and are committed to the Humanitarian
Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response (SPHERE Project) in delivering assistance to the most vulnerable. 
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For support to or for further information concerning Federation operations in this or other countries, please access the
Federation website at http://www.ifrc.org 
For longer-term programmes, please refer to the Federation's Annual Appeal. 
Peter Rees-Gildea
Head a.i.
Relationship Management Department 
Hiroshi Higashiura
Head
Asia Pacific
 
07 Jan 2002
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ReliefWeb report — 
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Vanuatu: Vanuatu - Earthquake OCHA Situation Report No. 2
Original published date:  04 Jan 2002
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs   
Disaster type:  Earthquake
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Ref: OCHA/GVA - 2002/0003
OCHA Situation Report No. 2
Vanuatu - Earthquake
4 January 2002 
The following information was provided by the Vanuatu National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) through the OCHA
Office of the Regional Disaster Response Adviser for the Pacific in Fiji. 
Situation and Damage 
1. Following yesterday's strong earthquake measuring 7.2 on the Richter scale, Vanuatu continues to experience aftershocks.
Among them another strong tremor was felt at night (local time) on 3 January. It is reported that the aftershock lasted just a
couple of seconds but was strong enough to cause items to fall off shelves. According to the United States Geological Survey,
the tremor measured 6.4 on the Richter scale with the epicentre situated in the same area as the first strong earthquake.
Another tremor was also reportedly felt at around 3 am (local time) on 4 January. Vanuatu Geology Department confirms that
aftershocks will continue for sometime. 
2. Approximately 500 people from low-lying areas especially along the coastal lines of Port Vila fled to higher ground when
the first earthquake occurred as a prevention measure against tsunami. At present, tsunami risk has been ruled off by the
Geology Department. 
3. According to an initial report from the assessment team comprised of relevant government entities and other organizations
including TELECOM Vanuatu and the Vanuatu Red Cross Society, the earthquake has caused some serious damage to
buildings and infrastructure such as bridges and roads. Heavy traffic is denied access to Mele bridge (which had been just
repaired following damage caused by a tropical cyclone), causing transport difficulties for people of North Efate. Further
technical assessment is required to confirm whether Prima bridge is safe for vehicle access. La Colle bridge received similar
damage. Teuma bridge is destroyed. 
4. The main wharf has not received damage. However, due to a landslide the road leading to the wharf is blocked by huge
rocks from the hillside. With the continuous aftershocks rocks are still rolling down. The road has been sealed off. 
5. The Ministry of Education has been relocated to another building as the engineers have confirmed that its building is no
longer safe to use. The nearby Lycee School is also believed to be in unsafe condition. 
6. There has been no major damage to power and water supply system and communication lines except for the outer islands
where there has been some disturbance to telephone lines. 
7. Public Works Department (PWD) is reviewing with relevant Government Departments options for immediate temporary
access for roads which had been blocked by landslides or bridges either destroyed or damaged. 
8. PWD, with the support from private engineers, is carrying out a more detailed assessment on the extent of damage to
infrastructure, the findings of which should become available in the next couple of days. 
9. At the request from the Government three technicians from ORSTOM (a scientific organization based in Vanuatu) will be
providing scientific data in the earthquake area. 
National and International Response 
10. Government departments and NGOs are working in partnership to ensure effective response as follows:
NDMO - Overall coordination
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Police Department - Security and general assessment
Public Works Dept. - Technical and engineering assessment
Geology Dept. - Scientific information technology assessment
Health Dept. - Health and medical assistance assessment
UNELCO Ltd. - Power line and water supply assessment and repair
Port Vila Municipal - Road clearance and building inspections
Vanuatu Red Cross - Assessment and medical assistance
Media - Information dissemination and updates
11. The Government of Vanuatu has not declared a state of emergency nor appealed for international emergency relief
assistance to date. 
12. OCHA is in contact with relevant government authorities in Vanuatu and will revert with further information when
available. 
13. This situation report, together with information on other ongoing emergencies, is also available on the OCHA Internet
website at http://www.reliefweb.int 
Telephone: +41-22-917 12 34
Fax: +41-22-917 00 23
E-mail:ochagva@un.org 
In case of emergency only: Tel. +41-22-917 20 10 
Desk Officers:
Mr. R. Mueller /Ms. S. DeSouza / Mr. S. Matsuka / Mr. K. Quiding
Direct Tel. +41-22-917 31 31 / 16 36 / 40 34 / 17 69 
Press contact:
(in GVA) - Ms. Elizabeth Byrs, direct Tel. +41-22-917 26 53
(in N.Y.) - Ms. Phyllis Lee, direct Tel. +1-212-963 48 32
 
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
04 Jan 2002
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ReliefWeb report — 
http://reliefweb.int/node/93061
 
Vanuatu: Vanuatu - Earthquake OCHA Situation Report No. 1
Original published date:  02 Jan 2002
  Country:    Vanuatu   
  Content format:    Situation Report   
  Language:    English   
  Source:    UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs   
Disaster type:  Earthquake
  Origin notes:       
  
  
Ref: OCHA/GVA - 2002/0001
OCHA Situation Report No. 1
Vanuatu - Earthquake
3 January 2002 
The OCHA Office of the Regional Disaster Response Advisor for the Pacific provided the following information. 
Situation and Damage 
1. A strong earthquake hit Port Vila, Vanuatu on 3 January 2002. According to the United States Geological Survey, the
earthquake measured 7.2 on the Richter scale with the epicentre situated at latitude 17.78 degrees south and longitude 167.88
degrees east (on the sea, approximately 45 km west of Port Vila). Its origin time was 17.22 hrs GMT on 2 January 2002 or
04.22 hrs local time on 3 January. Port Vila has a population of about 19,400 (approximately 10% of the total population of
Vanuatu). 
2. According to the Vanuatu government authorities, there has been no reporting of casualties so far. Communication lines
and water supply are working. Electricity was cut off for about 45 minutes but is now working. It was reported that 3 bridges
have either been damaged or destroyed. The Teouma bridge linking South East Efate to Port Vila and the Natoma bridge
have been destroyed. Damages have been caused to the Manoma bridge. In Port Vila, most of shop glass windows have been
broken and damages were reported to the Ministry of Education building and the nearby Lycee School building. A number of
aftershocks were felt around mid morning (local time). Landslides around the country have also been reported. 
3. The Vanuatu Disaster Management Committee met this morning and an assessment team was sent out. A preliminary
report will be available on 4 January as they are still awaiting assessments from other key departments. 
National and International Response 
4. To date the Government of the Vanuatu has not yet declared a state of emergency, nor requested any international
assistance. The National Disaster Committee will meet tomorrow to decide what measures need to be taken. 
5. OCHA is in contact with relevant government authorities in Vanuatu and will revert with further information when
available. 
6. This situation report, together with information on other ongoing emergencies, is also available on the OCHA Internet
Website at http://www.reliefweb.int 
Telephone: +41-22-917 12 34
Fax: +41-22-917 00 23
E-mail: ochagva@un.org 
In case of emergency only: Tel. +41-22-917 20 10 
Desk Officers:
Mr. R. Mueller /Ms. S. DeSouza / Mr. S. Matsuka /Mr.K.Quiding
Direct Tel. +41-22-917 31 31 / 16 36 / 40 34 / 17 69 
Press contact:
(in GVA) - Ms. Elizabeth Byrs, direct Tel. +41-22-917 26 53
(in N.Y.) - Ms. Phyllis Lee, direct Tel. +1-212-963 48 32
 
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UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit 
http://unocha.org/
.
02 Jan 2002
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