background image
background image
iii
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
The persecution and killing of individuals accused 
of practising so called ‘witchcraft’ is a significant 
phenomenon in many parts of the world, although it 
has not featured prominently on the radar screen of 
human rights monitors
UN Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial, Summary or Arbitrary Executions, Phillip Alston (2009)
background image
iii
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery
in the Highlands of
Papua New Guinea
Discussion Paper
Prepared for the 10
th
 Anniversary of
United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325
New York October 2010
background image
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
iv
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
1
Port Moresby
Aitape
Amanab
Maprik
Bogia
Okapa
Marawaka
Tari
Ambunti
Kikori
Balimo
Tufi
Finschhafen
Kandrian
Hoskins
Pomio
Kokopo
Namatanai
Morehead
Weam
Kupiano
Angoram
Telefomin
Talasea
Gloucester
Ewase
Milim
Panguna
Buin
Kwikila
Lumi
Koroba
Kabwum
Nadzab
Kokoda
Kiunga
Kavieng
Rabaul
Kimbe
Lae
Wewak
Madang
Wabag
Mendi
Mt. Hagen
Goroka
Kundiawa
Kerema
Vanimo
Daru
Arawa
Popondetta
Alotau
Esa'ala
Kulumadau
Lorengau
W E S T   S E P I K
E A S T   S E P I K
W E S T E R N  
G U L F
C E N T R A L
M A D A N G
M A N U S
WESTERN
 HIGHLANDS 
W E S T   N E W
B R I T A I N
E A S T   N E W
B R I T A I N
M I L N E   B A Y
N E W   I R E L A N D
B O U G A I N V I L L E
M O R O B E
ENGA 
CHIMBU 
SOUTHERN
 HIGHLANDS 
NATIONAL CAPITAL 
EASTERN
HIGHLANDS
I
N
D
O
N
E
S
I
A
S O L O M O N   I S L A N D S
AUSTRALIA
Manus
New
Ireland
New
Britain
Bougainville
Choiseul
Santa
Ysabel
Woodlark 
Pocklington Reef 
D'Entrecasteau
x Isla
nds
 
Louisiade A
rchip
elag
o
B i s marck  
     Arch
i p ela
g o
Taskul
Karkar
Long
Kiwai
Umboi
Mussau
Tabar
Lihir
Buka
Guadalcanal
Goodenough
Fergusson
Normanby
Misima
Tagula
Rossel
Ta
bar Island
s
Ta
bar Island
s
St. Matthias Group
Witu
Islands
Trobriand
Islands
Tanga
Islands
Feni
Islands
Admiralty
Islands
Pelelun
Islands
Hermit
Islands
Ne
w G
eorg
ia Group
Chambri
Lakes
Lake
Murray
Fly
St
ri
ck
l
a
n
d
Sepik
Ra
mu
C o r a l     S e a
B i s m a r c k     S e a
P A C I F I C     O C E A N
S o l o m o n     S e a
Gulf of Papua
Huon
Gulf
Torres Strait
Gosch
en S
tra
it
PAPUA
NEW GUINEA
0
0
100
200      250 km
50
100
     150 mi
50
150
The boundaries and names shown and the designations used 
on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance
by the United Nations. 
Map No. 4104 Rev. 1    UNITED NATIONS
January 2004
Department of Peacekeeping Operations
Cartographic Section
National capital
Provincial capital
City, town
Major airport
Reef
International boundary
Provincial boundary
Main road
PAPUA
NEW
GUINEA
PAPUA
NEW
GUINEA
background image
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
iv
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
1
Background of the Discussion Paper
On 30 October 2010, the UN Security Council will mark the 10th anniversary of its resolution 1325 to reaffirm its 
global commitments on women, peace and security.  For this occasion, the OHCHR Regional Office for the Pacific 
has prepared this discussion paper on armed tribal conflict and sorcery-related insecurity for women in the highlands 
of Papua New Guinea (PNG), to inform the important debate around the implementation of resolution 1325. 
UNSCR 1325 advocates for special recognition and respect for international law applicable to the rights and protection 
of women and girls, from gender based violence, particularly rape and other forms of sexual abuse and violence. The 
resolution emphasizes the responsibility of the State to put an end to impunity and to prosecute those responsible.
This discussion paper highlights from a gender and human rights perspective the neglected issues related to decades 
of what appears to be escalating tribal conflict in the highlands of PNG. In particular, this paper highlights the 
relevance of the human rights framework, and the principles underlying UNSCR1325, in analyzing and responding 
to armed tribal conflict and sorcery in Papua New Guinea. The paper discusses actions that could be taken by the 
national authorities to address the social and human rights impact of armed tribal conflicts in PNG which have caused 
tremendous suffering, including loss of lives, property, and internal displacement.
1
 Information for the discussion 
paper  was  collected  during  a  mission  undertaken  by  the  OHCHR  Pacific  gender  advisor  in  September  2010  to 
the  provinces  of  Goroka,  Kundiawa  and  Mount  Hagen,  which  comprise  the  Eastern  and Western  Highlands  of 
PNG.  Consultative meetings took place with women’s organizations, individual women leaders, government officials, 
representatives of non-governmental organisations, and tribal leaders involved in armed conflict. Likewise, research 
papers, human rights reports and other documents were reviewed.  The interviews and documented reports by local 
organizations revealed human rights violations during armed tribal conflict, as well as in situations of insecurity caused 
by attacks on those accused of sorcery, amounting to cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment of the victims as a form 
of sexual and gender based violence. 
In collecting information for this discussion paper, it became evident that there are major gaps in data related to 
insecurity  in  highlands,  both  in  terms  of  armed  tribal  conflict  and  insecurity  caused  by  threats  and  attacks  as  a 
result of allegations of sorcery.  In relation to armed tribal conflict, there is little data regarding the numbers of 
tribal  conflicts  taking  place,  the  number  of 
casualties, numbers of displaced, the locations 
where conflict is taking place or where people 
are  displaced  to.  Similarly,  with  sorcery 
related attacks and killings, there is no reliable 
data  on  the  numbers  of  attacks,  deaths, 
displacements or even the numbers of arrests 
or prosecutions. 
In this light, it is clear that greater efforts are 
needed to gather information and respond to 
these situations. It must also be said that this 
discussion paper is only an initial attempt on 
the side of OHCHR to raise the profile of some 
of these issues and is in no way exhaustive. It 
is intended to bring some of these issues to the 
table  for  further  discussion  and  to  promote 
recognition of the stark problems that exist. 
It is hoped that it will also provide an impetus 
for further steps to strengthen the protection 
of the human rights of ordinary women, men 
and children in the highlands.
1
 OHCHR does not take a position on whether tribal violence in Papua New Guinea should be classified as armed conflict in terms of 
international law, nor does it suggest such violence is a threat to international peace and security that should engage the attention of the UN 
Security Council.  It uses Security Council Resolution 1325 in this context as a relevant frame of reference for analysing the gender dimen-
sions of this violence and framing recommendations for action.
background image
2
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
2
3
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
3
II 
Context of Armed Tribal Conflict
Papua New Guinea occupies the eastern half of the tropical island of New Guinea, and comprises also numerous 
smaller  islands  and  atolls. The  central  part  of  the  island  rises  into  a  wide  ridge  of  mountains  known  as  the 
highlands, a territory that is so densely forested that the island’s many indigenous communities remained isolated 
from each other for millennia. These geographic characteristics have contributed to make Papua New Guineans 
one of the most heterogeneous people in the world with a population a little less than 7 million.
The people of PNG have a strong attachment to land, which is almost entirely held communally. Traditional 
indigenous communities do not recognize a permanent transfer of ownership when land is sold. Most Papua 
New Guineans still adhere strongly to traditional social structures, which have roots in village life with bonds of 
kinship and obligations extending beyond the immediate family group.
Tribal  fighting  has  long  been  a 
feature  of  life  in  the  highlands 
of  PNG,  with  conflicts  between 
and  within  tribes  being  fought 
by one generation after the other. 
Ancient  weaponry  comprised 
mainly  bows  and  arrows,  crude 
clubs  and  in  more  recent  times 
steel  bush  knives,  occasionally 
utilizing  corrugated  shields.  The 
usual  method  of  engagement  was 
for  conflicting  parties  to  line  up 
opposite each other, spend several 
hours verbally abusing each other, 
with small rushes towards and away from the enemy being made - increasing in boldness and courage. Eventually, 
a critical point was reached and the battle began in earnest.  
However,  this  traditional  form  of  fighting  has  dramatically  transformed  in  recent  decades  into  increasingly 
deadly conflicts fought with imported or homemade firearms. The introduction and proliferation of firearms in 
PNG has radically changed the face of conflict amongst tribes and clans in the highlands. Although no recent 
and  reliable  figures  are  available,  it  is  recognized  that  confrontations  with  firearms  have  resulted  in  a  steep 
increase in the numbers of mortalities and injuries, as well as in the number of people internally displaced.  
Tribal armed conflicts in the highlands of PNG have traditional long-standing, as well as contemporary causes.  
Originally, tribal conflicts were mainly disputes over territory, competition for land, women, and livelihood 
resources, such as livestock.  In some cases, sexual violence perpetrated against women belonging to one tribe by 
members of another tribe could also trigger an inter-clan conflict.  
However, since the country’s independence 35 years ago, elections have become one of the most acute causes of 
armed tribal conflicts. Electoral politics is a highly contested arena in which candidates, the majority of whom 
are male, and their clan supporters compete for government positions, at national, provincial or village level, 
which allows them to access, control and distribute public goods. In the highlands province of Simbu, a village 
magistrate and women leaders explained to OHCHR that people have come to regard positions in government 
as a major, or only, source of opportunity, resources and finance. 
In addition, the potentional for serious resource- based conflict in PNG should not be overlooked, particularly 
in the light of the armed conflict in the 1990s in Bougainville, which was sparked by issues relating to copper 
mining activities.  PNG is rich with natural resources and exploitation of these resources is increasing. Given the 
difficult and conflict-prone relationship to land in the country, it is foreseeable that extraction activities could 
fuel armed conflicts, if not dealt with carefully. Recent reports of conflicts among the tribes with land on the 
proposed route of the gas pipeline for the large LNG project further heighten concern of increased risk of armed 
conflict in the country.
background image
2
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
2
3
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
3
Armed  tribal  conflicts  bring  enormous  devastation  to  people’s  lives  and  property.  Tribal  conflicts  seriously 
undermine the dignity, safety and security of all individuals in the communities.  People are killed, attacked and 
raped,  homes and gardens are destroyed, schools closed down and communities are  displaced and fearful of 
reprisals.  In a tribal community in Minj, Western Highlands, tribal leaders told OHCHR that due to two years 
of conflict (2008-2010), some of their members had suffered depression and committed suicide due to their 
inability to cope with loss of land, property and lives, as well as rape and theft of livestock.
The increasing scale of armed tribal conflict has led to other social stresses, which particularly impact on women. 
One example is the escalating bride price due to armed tribal conflict. In PNG, traditionally a bride price is paid 
by the groom’s side to the bride’s family in order to allow the marriage to go ahead. In recent times, the bride 
price has been increasing and apparently having negative consequences for young women. Research by Oxfam 
has indicated that the increasing bride price is sometimes linked to compensation claims arising out of armed 
tribal conflicts.  ‘Young women expressed grave remorse at not being able to complete their education due to 
the need to fulfill family and clan obligations of marriage so that their bride wealth could be used to source 
compensation demands by their tribal enemies as a result of the conflict’.  (Oxfam, p84)
2
 .
Few  effective  measures  appear  to  have  been  taken  to  prevent  and  reduce  armed  tribal  conflict  in  PNG. 
Humanitarian responses are rare and there appears to have been no attempt to apply international standards 
and  frameworks  for    prevention  and  response,  including  analysis  of  the  displacement  situation  according  to 
the  Guiding  Principles  on  Internal  Displacement.  Again,  in  Minj,  tribal  leaders  expressed  frustration  over 
government inaction to their plight and the inability of the police to arrest perpetrators of crimes that led to the 
escalation of conflict. 
2
 Oxfam International PNG Highlands Programme, has given OHCHR permission to cite from their as yet unpublished report on 
sorcery and armed tribal conflicts in PNG. We have therefore referenced their material through-out the report, as it is used. All other 
information in this discussion paper relies on first hand material gathered during the OHCHR mission and secondary sources listed in 
the annex
background image
4
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
4
5
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
5
III 
Sorcery and Witchcraft Accusations as a 
Prevailing Form of Insecurity for Women
 
Of particular note and relevance to this paper is an apparently strong correlation between the insecurity brought 
about by tribal fighting and sorcery. According to the media, sorcery is one of the factors for inciting tribal fights in 
the highlands.  In the Hangonofi district (an area visited by the OHCHR mission), 25 of the 31 incidents reported 
of tribal fights from 2005–2007 were caused by sorcery.  For the same period in Kainantu district, a total of 11 
tribal fights were reported, of which 7 were related to sorcery.  In the Unggai Bena district, all of the 7 tribal fight 
cases from 2002-2006 were reported to be related to sorcery.
The Catholic Bishop of Kundiawa estimates that sorcery has caused the displacement of 10 – 15% of the Simbu 
population.  The displaced persons include victims of sorcery accusations and their families who are banished from 
the village after their homes, garden, livestock and other property are destroyed, or those individuals who fled from 
their usual place of residence in fear of being attacked and killed.  Some people have also said they left because of 
fear of being attacked by sorcerers.
Papua New Guinea ratified the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women 
(CEDAW) in January 1995. In its recommendations to the Government of PNG in July 2010, the independent 
panel of experts responsible for monitoring compliance of state parties reported the following:
[The Committee urges] the State party to take immediate and effective measures to investigate the incidence of  torture and killings of  
women and girls, especially old women, based on accusations of  witchcraft or sorcery, to prosecute and punish the perpetrators of  such acts 
and to prevent their reoccurrence in the future.  The Committee calls on the State party to accelerate its review of  the law on sorcery and 
sorcery-related killings and to strengthen the enforcement of  relevant legislation.  The committee urges the State party to strengthen its 
awareness-raising and educational efforts, targeted at both women and men, with the support of  civil society and involvement of  community 
and village chiefs and religious leaders, to eliminate this practice.
Women go through major insecurity due to sorcery and witchcraft allegations in Papua New Guinea, in particular 
in the highlands. Strong beliefs are held in PNG that there are individuals who possess magic powers, referred to 
as ‘sanguma’. The broad majority of the population in the highlands believes in extra-natural explanations to life 
misfortunes.  (Oxfam 2010) When a death, sickness or an accident occurs, it is common for community members 
to explain it as having been caused by the use of sorcery. Despite the lack of tangible data on this issue, allegations 
of sorcery, usually against women and more vulnerable members of the community, have been on the rise, with 
increasingly  violent  consequences,  including  the 
murder and physical mutilation of those accused of 
having practiced sorcery. 
In 2003, the Institute of Medical Research identified 
that  victims  of  sorcery-related  attacks  and  killings 
are  mainly  women,  in  particular  widows,  or  other 
vulnerable individuals who do not have any kin to 
protect them. Men are also victims of sorcery related 
attacks and killings, however, according to the PNG 
police, women are six times more likely to be accused 
of  sorcery  than  men.    According  to  information 
received, women who marry into a different tribe are 
more easily targeted, since there is less fear ofpayback.  
Widows and elderly women who do not have children 
or relatives to protect them, women who are born out 
of wedlock or who do not have any standing in their 
kinship are considered the most vulnerable to sorcery 
and witchcraft accusations.  Those who torture or do 
the killing are almost exclusively men, often related 
socially  or  biologically  to  the  victim,  and  often 
heavily intoxicated with alcohol and drugs. 
background image
4
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
4
5
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
5
Sorcery related killing is a violation of the right to life and a form of gender based violence. Those accused of sorcery 
can do very little to prove their innocence.  The accused are punished by death, injury,destruction of their property 
or  exile. They  are  subjected  to  cruel  and  inhuman  treatment  like  beatings  with  barbed  wire,  having  their  bones 
broken, burning with red hot metal, rape, suspending people over fire, cutting of body parts, amputation of limbs 
and dragging victims behind moving vehicles.  Among the murders reported were those victims that had been buried 
alive, beheaded, choked to death, thrown over cliffs, into rivers or caves, starved, axed, electrocuted, suffocated with 
smoke, forced to drink petrol, stoned or shot.  
The nature of the injuries inflicted on the ‘suspected’ sorcerer is usually very serious. They have included fractures of the 
scalp, the hand, and other bones, cutting of tendons and veins, and severe burns to the bodys. These are all acts intended 
to inflict serious harm and pain. Victims of sorcery related attacks are often near death when referred to the hospital.  
There  also  appear  to  be  many  instances  where  accusations  of  sorcery,  leading  to  killings,  injuries  or  exile,  are 
economically or personally motivated.  Several individuals interviewed during the OHCHR mission commented that 
deception and trickery are involved. For instance, accusations are made as a means to take over land or possessions of 
those accused, or because payments have been made by third parties to name alleged sorcerers. Increasingly, there is 
a perception that accusations of sorcery are a convenient disguise for premeditated murder based more on a person’s 
dislike for another, jealousy, envy, greed, rivalry or revenge. 
The government does not have available data on sorcery related killings and attacks, or numbers of individuals arrested, 
prosecuted and punished for such attacks. However, other sources of information indicate that it is an a serious issue, 
affecting increasing numbers of people. According to media reports, at least 50 women were reported killed in 2009 
for sorcery and witchcraft. PNG’s status report to the CEDAW committee stated that these killings have doubled in 
recent times. Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and OXFAM PNG Highlands Program have all expressed 
serious concerns over attacks on women and men accused of sorcery, living mainly in rural highland areas. 
The highlands region has a higher prevalence of sorcery related violence than other regions.  Records kept by the Simbu 
police registered 92 deaths linked to sorcery accusations between for April 2000 – June 2005 The provinces of Simbu and 
Eastern Highlands reported more than 50 cases of sorcery related death in 2008. In January 2009, the PNG police reported 
that the number of people killed for alleged involvement in sorcery had risen.   Many more cases remain unreported.
Attacks against people accused of sorcery can be prosecuted as a crime under ordinary criminal legislation and there 
has been at least one case in 2009 for which an attacker was imprisoned under the criminal law for causing the death 
of someone accused of sorcery. There is also the PNG Sorcery Act of 1971 (enacted before independence), an Act 
‘to prevent and punish evil practices of sorcery and other similar evil practices and for other purposes relating to 
such practices’.  It is premised on an acknowledgement of the 
existence of sorcery and criminalizes both those who practice it 
and those who attack people accused of sorcery.  More critically, 
the Sorcery Act focuses principally on the sorcerer as perpetrator 
and does not adequately cater for instances in which the alleged 
sorcerers are the victims. It is rarely used in practice. The PNG 
Constitutional  Review  and  Law  Reform  Commission  is  now 
consulting with communities over the need for better legislation 
to address sorcery related killings.  
Law enforcement in PNG, and in particular the capacity and 
will  of  the  police  forces  to  respond  to  sorcery  related  attacks 
is  very  limited.  In  addition  to  the  taboo  surrounding  sorcery, 
which may prevent intervention, other reasons given for lack of 
response to requests for assistance include shortage of personnel, 
vehicles and fuel, and limited presence of the police. In many 
cases, communities can be reluctant to give information to the 
police due either to fear of attack or support for the attackers. 
However,  despite  the  real  difficulties  faced,  the  lack  of  police 
response  is  remarkable  and  leads  to  a  situation  of  almost 
unchecked impunity.  
background image
6
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
6
7
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
7
The general perception in the communities visited during the mission was that, when it came to sorcery, the role of 
the police, the church and the rule of law was ineffective.  Many people, in some instances including the police and 
other law enforcers, felt that the killing and attacks against those accused of sorcery were justified and needed to be 
dealt with by the community.  
It is perhaps the media that plays a more significant role in relation to uncovering, publicising and condemning 
sorcery related attacks in the highlands of PNG. Regularly the newspapers print articles exposing new killings and 
attacks. Just prior to publication, the national newspaper Courier-Post printed an article that began with the following 
description of a recent attack.
“PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea (Oct. 6, 2010) – In Papua New Guinea, four people are dead. They were 
brutally tortured and while they were crying out in agony, their tormentors tied their legs and hands, then threw them 
into the fast flowing Waghi River. Their bodies have not been recovered. Two of those killed were an elderly married 
couple, hardly strong enough to defend themselves against the attack. The deceased were accused of using sorcery to 
kill a village chief. This happened on September 4 in Wangoi, Chuave in the Chimbu Province.”
The allegations contained in the article have not been verified, nonetheless such allegations are regularly reported 
in the national print media in PNG and further confirm a concerning pattern of abuse and few reports of arrests 
or prosecutions of perpetrators.  
Cases of Sorcery Related Killings:
It is important to note that most cases of sorcery related attacks and killings are not reported to the police, the 
media, human rights defenders or other bodies and are therefore, left undocumented. Even cases that have been 
reported to the police or the media are often not fully investigated and the details remain unknown. Due to the lack 
of alternatives, individual human rights defenders often take tremendous personal risk to try to provide protection 
to persons at risk due to sorcery related accusations. Below, we outline three representative cases that have been 
documented.
The Anna Benny Women’s Human Rights Defender Case
Anna Benny disappeared in the second week of November 2005, after she attempted to defend her sister-in-law, 
who was being held in a house and attacked on suspicion of practicing sorcery.  Anna and her sister-in-law were 
both shot and killed.The police in Goroka town did not take any action in her case and refused to investigate on 
the basis that they had not received a complaint from the family. A friend of Anna’s did, however, make a complaint 
to the police, but was reportedly told that they could not act on hearsay reports. Other women’s rights defenders 
have tried to investigate the case themselves and subsequently received threats.
background image
6
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
6
7
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
7
Anna was a women’s rights defender from Goroka who advocated for cases of violence against women to be treated 
as serious criminal offences. Her friends recounted a case in which Anna was actively involved and related to the 
abduction and rape of three young girls, aged from 7-11 years old, during tribal confrontations in the Eastern 
Highlands. Anna refused to allow the rape of the young girls to be viewed merely as a ‘pay back’ and she insisted 
that compensation was not an appropriate settlement.  Instead she believed the police must arrest those responsible 
for the abduction and rape.  She was reportedly told that this was not her business and that it was a family matter. 
Despite her efforts, none of the perpetrators were charged or faced trial. She was able, though, to ensure that the 
girls were returned to their families. 
On 26 January 2009, Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch sent joint letters to Minister of Justice 
Hon. Dr. Alan Marat and Police Commissioner Gari Baki expressing concern at ongoing reports of sorcery related 
killings, particularly women, and called for greater action from the authorities to curb the violence and murders.  
The letters raised Anna Benny’s case specifically and called for a thorough investigation.
Kerebug Dump Case
On 6 January 2009, at Kerebug Dump in Mount Hagen, a woman was reportedly lashed naked to a pole and burnt 
to death, after allegedly being accused of practicing sorcery. The media reported that the woman “was burnt alive after 
being blind-folded, both her limbs and parts of the abdomen tied to a piece of log and her mouth strapped and gagged 
with rags. According to eyewitnesses, a truck loaded with five used truck tyres and firewood drove into the dump site at 
around 2am yesterday... [a witness] who lives in the nearby settlement, said the suspects then lined up the tyres, poured 
petrol over them and the firewood with the woman lying over it and set her ablaze.” (Courier Post 7 January 2009)  The 
victim had supposedly “confessed” to having eaten a man’s heart.
When OHCHR contacted the police  about the case, they said that they had identified the body, despite the fact that it 
was badly burnt, but were not publicly releasing the name of the victim. The police also stated that an investigation was 
under way. OHCHR is not aware of any prosecutions resulting from the case. 
Nolamb Yekum Case
Nolamb Yekum is from Moroboby in Kol, Jimi District in the Juwaka province in the highlands.  She and her husband 
and two children lived in Banz, North Waghi District. By early 2008, they had developed their land and made it home. 
Another baby was on the way and her brother in law, Peter Duno, had joined them.  Over some years prior to this, 
members of a tribe in Banz had made several attempts to push them off the land. In the first week of February 2008, the 
body of Peter Duno was found floating in the Mobol river.  
Those who had tried to push Nolamb and her family off the land quickly accused them of killing Peter Duno through 
the use of sorcery. She ran in fear of her life, weighed down by her pregnancy.  
She and her husband were reportedly caught on February 6 and a group of men tied a rope around her neck and pulled it 
over the branch of a tree. While she was hanging in the air her water broke and her baby was born.  Someone helped the 
baby, a girl, and also helped Nolamb down from the tree. She fled with her baby and sought refuge back in Jimi district.
She later learned that her two other children had died from starvation.  She was subsequently reunited with her husband 
after two years.  In a statement to the media, she urged the government of PNG to give assistance to people who are 
accused of sorcery.  “We are now refugees in our own country,” she said (Highlands Post, 27 January 2010)
In response to the Nolamb Yekum case, representatives of the local authorities suggested that government set up a 
‘refugee camp’ for sorcery victims who are displaced, stigmatized and have nowhere to live.  
One official interviewed by a local newspaper, stated:  “I see that there is no policy on sorceries. The victims of sorceries 
are displaced. They are not accepted in the community for the rest of their life and their generations to come. They 
will be refugees for their entire life and their generations to come. It’s like permanent damage to a family. Killing and 
destroying of food gardens is not a solution. Law is the solution,” he said. (Highlands Post, 27 January 2010)
background image
8
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
8
9
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
9
IV 
Gender, insecurity and peace mediation
Conflict is a gendered phenomena and the experiences of women and men in situations of insecurity, conflict and 
conflict resolution are significantly different.
In  general,  armed  conflict  between  tribes  in  PNG  are  resolved  through  traditional  mediation,  through  local 
government structures, including village courts and usually supported by the local law and justice sector, or a 
combination of the two.  With some exceptions, outlined in more detail below, women have not played a significant 
role in either form of peace mediation. Culturally, women do not participate in traditional peace mediation efforts. 
During interviews with women from Kafi, whose tribes had recently been in armed conflict, they explained that 
their role was to cook for the men while they were fighting and watch over the village for enemy encroachment. 
During mediation and peace processes they had no role, and their concerns could only be expressed through their 
fathers, brothers and husbands.   
In  local  government  facilitated 
mediations,  women  also  do  not 
feature  as  significant  actors, 
although  there  can  be  room  for 
NGOs  or  local  organisations  to 
participate,  which  may  include 
women  (see  below).  For  the 
most  part,  the  village  courts
3
  are 
underfunded and lack supervision 
and  support  and  so  the  role 
they  play  can  vary  significantly, 
depending  on  the  individuals 
present.  Tribal  male  leaders  can 
also  feed  into  these  processes, 
commanding  respect  when  they 
are quick to respond to disputes. The need for involvement of women has been recognized in a 2000 amendment 
to the Village Court Act, which made mandatory the presence of at least one female magistrate. Unfortunately, this 
is still to be implemented.
The provision of compensation between tribes in conflict is a traditional means of resolving disputes. Compensation 
can be paid by one tribe to another for damage done during the conflict, including for deaths caused or rape of 
women. During the OHCHR mission, tribal leaders in Minj expressed concern over the level of compensation 
demanded for the death of one man. In their case, they felt that unreasonable compensation claims had caused more 
problems and made the situation more confrontational and a determinant of further violence.  They brought the 
matter to the village courts, district mediation council, police authorities and to their representative in the national 
parliament in Port Moresby, but to no avail.  According to the persons affected the failure of the local authorities 
and parliamentarians to respond to this dispute contributed to another armed tribal conflict on 29-30 September 
2010, and 4 men died in the fighting. At the time of writing, the area they live in is considered a fighting zone.
Compensation also has significant gendered elements, in particular in the situation of tribes receiving monetary 
payments in compensation for the rape of women. Compensation is not paid to the women and the benefits are not 
received by the women. Communities often do not report the crime of rape to the police and perpetrators usually 
do not face criminal prosecution. 
Insecurity that arises out of allegations of sorcery is not considered a form of conflict that can be solved through 
mediation. If it is reported to police, it can be dealt with through the criminal law. However, the broader effects of 
sorcery accusations on the community at large, including those who are displaced through such accusations or fear 
of them, are not addressed, it seems, either through traditional or governmental systems.
3
 Village courts are established by a statute, with the intention of resolving disputes and maintaining peace and harmony in local communities, 
by the application of customary law.  Village court magistrates are appointed by the provincial administration.  
background image
8
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
8
9
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
9
A case study on women for peace:
Women in the highlands have made on-going efforts to participate in ending armed tribal conflicts. The Kup 
Women for Peace in Simbu province were some of these women. The village of Kup is in the Kerowagi District 
and has suffered generations of inter-tribal and clan conflict. For the last 30 years, there has been protracted armed 
tribal conflict. As a consequence of this long-standing conflict, out of sheer courage, audacity and determination, 
women in Kup decided to respond to stop the fighting. They began their work in 2001 and since then, they played 
a major role in bringing to a standstill some of the conflict. Over an 8 year period they were able to stem incidents 
of tribal fights.  However, in 2009 an armed tribal conflict has truly put Kup Women for Peace to the test in dealing 
with the insecurity.
In  late  2009,  a  land  dispute  arose  between  two  sub-clans  led  by  two  businessman  (Dambekanim  and  Kidim-
Kunaglgapam), both from the Kumai tribe of Kup. Several community mediations took place, facilitated by Kup 
Women with the aim of preventing armed fighting between the two sub-clans. A total of 4 mediation processes 
were held to resolve the developing inter- clan conflict. Initiated by the Kup Women, the final mediation process 
was led by the Simbu Provincial authorities and produced a Memorandum of Understanding as a part of a statutory 
declaration. It was signed by the two conflicting sub-clans and witnessed by the senior magistrate from the Kundiawa 
District Court, police personnel and the Provincial Peace Mediation team. 
During the time of the final mediation, a drunken youth from Dambekane was arrested by police and put in police 
custody, where he sustained significant injuries and died. The news of the youth’s death in police custody reached 
the clansmen (Dambekane) and tension rose again.  The clansmen, instead of bringing the matter to police for 
investigation, blamed the Kunanglgapam clan, claiming that the youth would not have died if there had not been a 
mediation in town that day.  Days after the burial, stealing of pigs and garden foods of both clans occurred.  Then 
a member of the Kunanglgapam clan was shot dead as he was in the process of removing iron roofing from the 
elementary school near his village, knowing that violence was brewing and could destroy the school. In September, 
15 policemen were supported by the Kup Women for Peace and the Provincial Police Commander to camp in 
Kup to stop a further escalation of violence. They stayed for approximately two weeks and, although tense, there 
were no significant acts of violence. The police, who were camping at Gongua to stop any occurrence of violence, 
were asked by the police hierarchy to withdraw and retreat to Kundiawa - for reasons unknown to the community. 
The Kundiawa police investigated the death in custody and found a police officer responsible.  The case was then 
referred to Port Moresby, and the current status of the case is not known. 
background image
10
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
10
11
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
11
After the police had left, on 21 September 2009, the Simbu Provincial Peace and Good Order Committee met and 
declared Kerowagi a fighting zone due to the violence that had erupted between the two clans.   On 15 October 
2009, a number of women from Pawakanem sub-clan went to Tembugwa village when they were stopped and 
harassed by the youths from the rival clan.  This incident led to the escalation of fighting and now included related 
sub-clans who had not previously been involved.  On 2 November 2009, the Dambekane clan ventured into their 
rival clan’s land and other allied sub-clans in Kup and burned down the remaining houses, displacing everyone to 
the mountains. The Kup Women’s centre was also broken into, ransacked and all resources and equipment were 
destroyed.
The  Kup  Women  for  Peace  told  the  OHCHR 
mission  that  both  clans  suffered  the  following 
impact from the 2009 armed conflict:  
Dambekanem  clan
  –  the  entire  village  was 
destroyed,  coffee  bushes  and  food  gardens  up-
rooted.  An  estimated  population  of  200  people 
from  this  clan  was  displaced. They  moved  to  the 
other  side  of  Wahgi  River  and  further  out  to  the 
Western Highland province. Two men were killed.  
The  Bandi  clan,  allied  with  Dambekanem  clan, 
had 50 houses burnt down with food gardens and 
coffee bushes destroyed. The Pawakanem clan had 
approximately 20 houses burnt down. Those in the 
Damekanem clan who were living in Mapuk village 
had all their houses destroyed and in the Mandekup 
clan,  an  elementary  school  for  100  children  was 
destroyed. The PNG Bible Church run ACE school 
of 200 students was totally destroyed and 20 houses 
burnt. 
Kunanglgapam clan:
  An estimated population of 
300 people was affected, with 50 houses destroyed. 
Coffee bushes and food gardens and other property 
were destroyed. The same clan had a second village 
(Gonga) of about 250 people, where approximately 
100 houses were destroyed and the entire population 
was displaced. An elementary school for 100 children 
was also destroyed. In the Ugumkanem clan, twenty 
houses were burnt with gardens and other property 
destroyed.  
Although no figures were given, interviews indicated 
that  women  and  girls  were  raped  or  otherwise 
sexually assaulted during the conflict.
The Kup Women for Peace were also significantly 
affected. Its members were divided between different 
clan  groupings,  a  number  of  them  were  displaced 
and divided due to the conflict.  Despite their initial 
success in preventing the fighting, the combination 
of  conflicting  interests,  lack  of  law  enforcement, 
and high powered guns led to armed tribal conflict. 
Now they have to work again towards reconstructing 
their villages and maintaining peace in an insecure 
environment. 
background image
10
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
10
11
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
11
Conclusion
Deep concern is expressed at the level of insecurity in the highlands of Papua New Guinea as a result of continuing 
armed tribal conflict and sorcery related killing.
It is vital that the government of Papua New Guinea takes urgent measures to fulfil its obligations under international 
human rights law, and provide much needed protection to the people who are affected. Political will to close the 
protection gap needs to be accompanied by adequate budget allocations to key security agencies like the police. The 
international community is urged to support the government in providing protection from human rights abuses 
linked to the insecurity, as well as addressing the root causes of conflict, which thus far appear not to have received 
the level of attention they deserve.
Above all, it is important for the government and the international community to listen directly to women in Papua 
New Guinea who experience serious human rights violations as a result of armed tribal conflict and sorcery, and to heed 
their obligations to effectively implement human rights protections reflected in its international treaty commitments 
and the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on women, peace and security. 
background image
12
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
12
13
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
13
References and Lists of Documents Reviewed
1.  Violence and Insecurity in the Southern Highlands of Papua New Guinea, Oxfam International PNG 
Highland Programme 2010
2.  Witch Killing and Engendered Violence in Simbu, Philip Gibbs, November 2008, The Melanesia Institute, 
Goroka, Papua New Guinea
3.  Simbu and Eastern Highlands Sorcery Scoping Report, March 2009, PNG Law and Justice Sector Secretariat
4.  Sorcery Belief and Practices in the Simbu Province, Oxfam International PNG Highland Programme, 2010
5.  Ethnic Conflict in Papua New Guinea by Benjamin Reily, Asia Pacific Viewpoint, Vol.49.No.1, April 2008, 
ISSN 1360-7456, pp 12-22
6.  Development in Wabag District:  Some Preliminary Considerations for Post-Conflict Reconstruction, 
Vincent Warakai and Jacob Taru, November 2009
7.  Responding to Violence against Women in Melanesia and East Timor, Australia’s Response to the ODE Report, 
AUSAID, 2009, ISBN 978-1-9211285-83-7
8.  Women, Peace and Security, AUSIAD Implementation of UNSCR 1325, 2010
9.  PNG Post Courier, Nolam Yekum’s Story, 25 January 2010
10.  Highland Post, Help Sorcery Victims, by Kolopu Waima,  27 January 2010
11.  Sorcery and AIDS in Simbu, East Sepik and Enga Provinces. Philip Gibbs, The National Research Institute, 
Occasional Paper No.2. February 2009
12.  Case Study on Papua New Guinea:  On Informal Justice System, Carried out on behalf of UNDP, UNICEF 
and UNIFEM by the Danish Institute for Human Rights
13.  CEDAW/C/PNG/CO/3, 46
th
 Session July 2010, Concluding Observations of the Committee on the 
Elimination of Discrimination against Women
14.  Jumping the Gun? Reflections on armed violence in Papua New Guinea, by Nicole Haley and Robert Muggah, 
ISSN 1024-6029, Volume 15, Issue 2, 2006
15.  CEDAW/C/PNG/CO/3, 46
th
 Session July, Government of Papua New Guinea Report
16.  Ethnic Conflict in Papua New Guinea by Benjamin Reilly Asia Pacific Viewpoint, Vol. 49, No. 1, April 2008 
ISSN 1360-7456, pp12–22
17.  Youths, Elders, and the Wages of War in Enga Province, PAPUA NEW GUINEA, by Polly Weissner, 
ANU (Australian National University) Discussion Paper 2010/30
18.  Amnesty International Bulletin, AI and Human Rights Watch Joint Letter to Government of Papua New 
Guinea, 26 January 2009
19.  Amnesty International, The Impact of Guns on Women’s Lives, Index Number: ACT 30/001/2005, 
Date Published: 7 March 2005
20.  Sanguma in Paradise, Sorcery Witchcraft and Christianity in Papua New Guinea, Edited by Franco Zocca, 
The Melanesian Institute, ISSN 0253-2913, ISBN: 9980-013-3
21.  United Nations Security Council 1325, S/Res/1325 (2000)
22.  Amnesty International, Papua New Guinea, Update to CEDAW 46th Session, ASA 34/004/2010
background image
12
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
12
13
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
13
All photos by Indai Sajor, taken during the
OHCHR mission to Papua New Guinea,
September 2010
background image
14
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
14
Tribal fighting in PNG because of LNG project says Kidu
Radio New Zealand International, 11 February, 2010
Papua New Guinea’s Minister for Community Development says a multi-billion dollar liquified natural gas project is spurring 
inter-village war between traditionally non-violent tribal groups.
Dame Carol Kidu’s comment comes as police in Southern Highlands continue to dismiss suggestions that violence could 
derail Exxon Mobil’s construction of an LNG pipeline between the province and Port Moresby. Despite the company’s 
suspension of construction in several areas this week in response to ongoing violence, police say tribal fighting existed long 
before the project and is unrelated. But Dame Carol says she spent last week negotiating between two villages within the 
LNG site area who went to war over the project.
“We expect those things in some tribal groups in the remote areas but these are groups of people who have been through a 
long period of missionisation, colonisation, pacification and were seen as the very non-violent people of Papua New Guinea. 
But suddenly with this LNG project and all of the tensions and jealousies over the land ownership and all these things, it 
blew up into a tribal war, a village war; inter-village war.”
Dame Carol Kidu, Papua New Guinea’s Minister for Community Development.
background image
14
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
14
Brutal sorcery killing shocks Papua New Guinea
PNG Post-Courier, 2 Sept., 2010
Can the government or somebody do something?
That is the question citizens in Western Highlands are asking following the death of a woman – killed in the most horrific 
manner over sorcery allegations on Monday afternoon that left her four children living with relatives in fear. Their mother was 
tied with barbed wires, publicly crucified and later burnt to ashes in a village on Monday afternoon. Reports say their father 
had so far escaped from the killing as he feared for his own life. The barbaric killing took place at Kontena village in Anglimp 
sub district. The Post-Courier visited the crime scene early yesterday and confirmed the incident.
The woman, a migrant settler from Mt Au, in East Kambia, a remote area in South Waghi, was allegedly accused of killing a 
young man from the Kuli Nangen tribe through sorcery. According to relatives of the dead man, the woman confronted him on 
Sunday over PGK10 [US$3.60] he had borrowed from her three weeks ago. His younger brother Petrus Kume said suspicions 
were raised when the man complained of severe stomach aches after the woman had left without being repaid. Mr. Kume, a 
councilor and former deputy president in the Anglimp LLG, said his brother died early Monday morning. Relatives immediately 
surrounded the victim’s house, captured her and tied her up, using logs and barbed wires and displayed her in public, similar 
to a crucifixion. Witnesses say she was badly beaten; her left arm chopped off and went through extensive interrogation 
before being taken to the roadside where she was burnt alive using petrol, logs and used tires.
Mr. Kume claimed the woman confessed to placing his brother’s heart beside a creek. When the Post-Courier visited, only 
parts of her intestines were covered with raw earth.
Copyright © 2010 PNG Post-Courier. All Rights Reserved
Pacific Islands Report
Layout and design: Gerardo Antonio
Printed in Davui Printery, Fiji
October 2010
background image
16
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
  
Armed Tribal Conflict and Sorcery in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea   
16