background image
The importance of mangrove forest in 
tsunami disaster mitigation
Rabindra Osti Researcher, Shigenobu Tanaka Senior Researcher and Toshikazu 
Tokioka Researcher, International Centre for Water Hazard and Risk Management, 
Japan 
Tsunamis and storm surges have killed more than one million people and some three billion 
people currently live with a high risk of these disasters, which are becoming more frequent and 
devastating worldwide. Effective mitigation of such disasters is possible via healthy coastal forests, 
which can reduce the energy of tsunamis. In recent years, these natural barriers have declined 
due to adverse human and natural activities. In the past 20 years, the world has lost almost 50 per 
cent of its mangrove forests, making them one of the most endangered landscapes. It is essential 
to recover them and to use them as a shield against a tsunami and as a resource to secure optimal 
socio-economic, ecological and environmental benefits. This paper examines the emerging scenario 
facing mangrove forests, discusses protection from tsunamis, and proposes a way to improve the 
current situation. We hope that practical tips will help communities and agencies to work collec-
tively to achieve a common goal.
Keywords: coastal community development, disaster mitigation, mangrove forest, 
poverty, storm surge, tsunami
Background
Mangrove forests play a hugely important role in coastal community development 
and in maintaining the coastal environment. Wide, elongated, dense, and mature 
mangrove forests growing along the shoreline can help to reduce the devastating 
impact of a tsunami and storm surge by decreasing their wave energies. In addition, 
they provide a variety of services in relation to coastal ecology and societies, including 
coastal erosion prevention, protection of coral reefs from siltation, pollutant control, 
production of food, timber and traditional medicines, and provision of shelter for 
some indigenous people and an assortment of flora and fauna.
  The Indian Ocean tsunami of 26 December 2004, which was responsible for the 
loss of some 225,000 lives and millions of US dollars of property damage, was one 
of the worst events in the history of natural disasters. Although the magnitude of 
the tsunami waves was high along all of the affected coasts, human losses and the 
amount of damage to inland property and built infrastructure were less in places 
with healthy mangrove or coastal forests, such as in Andaman and Nicobar Islands and 
some parts of Tamil Nadu state in India (Selvam, 2005). Many other settings, where 
coastal forest had been significantly degraded or had been converted for other forms 
of land use, suffered high losses. The importance of mangrove forests in mitigating 
tsunami disasters is not a new discovery, but now many scientific studies are being 
doi:10.1111/j.0361­3666.2008.01070.x
Disasters, 2009, 33(2): 203−213. © 2009 The Author(s). Journal compilation © Overseas Development Institute, 2009. 
Published by Blackwell Publishing, 9600 Garsington Road, Oxford, OX4 2DQ, UK and 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148, USA
background image
Rabindra Osti, Shigenobu Tanaka and Toshikazu Tokioka
204 
conducted to understand the role of coastal forest in guarding against tsunami dis­
asters from different standpoints. 
  The control function played by coastal forest on 26 December 2004 is widely cov­
ered in many works (see, for example, Selvam, 2005; Dahdouh­Guebas et al., 2005; 
IUCN, 2005; Upadhyay, Ranjan and Singh, 2002; Padma, 2004; and Williams, 
2005). The role of mangrove forest in mitigating the outcomes of a tsunami disas­
ter, especially in 2004, is covered in the study by Selvam (2005), which is based on 
satellite and field data. His laboratory experiments showed that 30 trees per 100 
square metres might reduce the maximum flow of a tsunami by more than 90 per 
cent. Similarly, Hiraishi (2005) numerically simulated the reduction of tsunami flow 
pressure by increasing the density of the planted zone, reproduced by considering 
drag forces exerted by the individual trunk and leaf parts of trees. Kathiresan and 
Rajendran (2005) used linear regressions to identify the value added by mangrove 
forest in reducing per capita mortality in India due to the 2004 tsunami. However, 
Kerr, Baird and Campbell (2006) highlighted a weakness in their regression analysis, 
and suggested that more reliable studies were needed to verify the findings. A few 
other studies, such as Mazda et al. (2006) and Wolanski (2006), suggest that the wave 
attenuation function of certain types of mangroves is highest under particular con­
ditions and not necessarily for any magnitude of wave.
  The results of these studies emphasise the need for further research to identify the 
optimal mangrove function to guard against tsunami and storm surges with different 
physical characteristics. Although these individual pieces of research help in under­
standing the basic functions of a mangrove forest, the applicability of the results has 
yet to be proven under a variety of circumstances.
  When analysing the control functions, the most important thing to identify is cor­
relation among different parameters, such as physical characteristics of the tsunami 
wave, local topography, features of the mangrove forest, and the nature of the built­
up environment. The physical components of a mangrove forest include normal 
height, shape and size of trees, inner plants, stiffness of individual trees, width and 
length of the forest, seasonal variations, and location and orientation of trees. In 
addition, tsunami­ and mangrove­related research should highlight the environ­
mental, societal and economic concerns of the region.
  Community forest­ and community­based disaster management approaches are 
gaining high recognition in developing countries (Osti, Shigenobu and Toshikazu, 
2008; Osti, 2004). Such knowledge can be harnessed for the development of coastal 
forests to increase the welfare of coastal communities and to achieve sustainable devel­
opment in a region. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address current gaps.
Tsunami and the mangrove forest: problems and prospects
A tsunami is one of the deadliest natural hazards, claiming (together with storm 
surges) more than one million lives in many parts of the world, and mitigation of 
such an event is highly challenging because of its complex development process and 
background image
The importance of mangrove forest in tsunami disaster mitigation
205
Table 1 Fatal tsunami events throughout history
Year/tsunami name/location
Deaths
Year/tsunami name/location
Deaths
2007: Solomon Islands
52
1929: Newfoundland, Canada (SML)
29
2006: Java, all over Indonesia
800
1923: Sagami Bay, Kanto, Japan
~145,000
2004: Indian Ocean tsunami, Asia
~225,000
1908: Messina, Italy
~100,000
1999: Thatta and Badin, Pakistan
400
1906: Ecuador and Colombia
1,500
1998: Papua New Guinea
2,200
1899: Bada Sea, Indonesia
3,620
1997: Different locations
400
1896: Sanriku, Japan
26,360
1996: Minahassa Peninsula
24
1888 Ritter Island, Papua New Guinea (LS)
~3,000
1996: Biak, Irian Java
161
1883: Krakatoa, Indonesia (Vol)
36,500
1996: North coast of Peru
12
1868: Arica, northern Chile
25,674
1995: Jalisco, Mexico
1
1868: Hawaii
81
1994: Eastern Java, Indonesia
223
1854: Nankaido, Japan
3,000
1994: Mindoro Island
70
1826: Japan
~27,000
1993: Okushiri Island, Japan
200
1792: Mt. Unzen, Kyushu, Japan
15,030
1993: Different locations
59
1782: South China (China Taiwan)
~40,000
1992: Flores Island and Babi Island
1,953
1771: Ryukyu Trench, Japan
13,486
1992: Nicaragua
170
1755: Lisbon, Portugal
~60,000
1983: Western part of Japan
104
1746: Lima, Peru
3,800
1979: Irian and Lomblem, Indonesia
639
1707: Tokaido-Nankaido, Japan
~30,000
1979: Nice, France
23
1703: Tokai-Kashima, Japan
5,233
1979: San Juan Island, Colombia
250
1703: Awa, Japan
~100,000
1976: Cotabato city, Philippines
8,000
1692: Jamaica
3,000
1975: Hawaiian tsunami, Hawaii
2
1674: Banda Sea, Indonesia
2,243
1964: Prince William Sound, US
130
1611: Sanriku Japan
5,000
1960: Chilean tsunami, many parts
2,290
1606: Bristol Channel, UK (ME)
2,000
1960: Hilo Hawaii
61
1605: Nankaido, Japan
5,000
1958: Lituya Bay, Alaska, US
3
1570: Chile
2,000
1946: Nankaido, Japan
1,997
497 BC: Potidaea, Greece
Many
1946: Aleutian tsunami, Hilo Hawaii
165
1410 BC: Santorini, Greece
~100,000
1945: Arabian Sea, Makran coast
~4,000
5000 BC: North Atlantic (SML)
Many
1933: Sanriku, Japan
3,008
Total deaths: more than one million
Key: Vol = Volcano; ME = Meteorological extremities; SML = Sub­marine landslide; LS = Landslide.
background image
Rabindra Osti, Shigenobu Tanaka and Toshikazu Tokioka
206 
physical characteristics. Different natural processes, such as an earthquake, sub­marine 
and sub­arial landslides, and hydrometeorological conditions, usually trigger a tsu­
nami. Records place the East Pacific at the top of the list of highly affected regions 
(see Table 1).
  The trend of destruction of human lives and the natural and built environment 
due to tsunamis increased significantly from 1700–1930 (see Figure 1). In this period, 
countries such as Italy, Japan and Portugal were severely affected (see Table 1).
  Thanks to strong economic growth and the development of advance technologies, 
developed countries have considerably improved systems to counter tsunamis in 
their territories. Developing countries, however, still lack the resources to cope with 
problems and face extreme threats of tsunami and storm surge disasters. Damage 
due to the 2004 tsunami is a good example. In addition to unpredictable natural 
events, other human factors heighten the possibility of destruction, such as rapid rises 
in population density (see Figure 1), urbanisation, industrialisation, and coastal de­
forestation. Furthermore, disaster awareness is extremely low in developing countries. 
Such awareness among coastal residents is vital because less aware people, who cannot 
properly prepare for events, tend to be the primary victims.
  Several countermeasures, especially structural initiatives, are being widely adopted 
in developed and developing countries. These countermeasures have reduced the 
aesthetic value of coastal areas, generated an adverse environmental impact, and 
inhibited the ability of people and nature to interact with the sea. Developments 
have yielded some benefits to communities but also they have replaced traditional 
assets, causing much complexity.
  Nature itself makes it possible to mitigate the impact of a tsunami by growing 
coastal forests, balancing the coastal environment in a proportional manner. The 
Figure 1 Global population density and number of people  
killed by tsunamis, 1600–2007
background image
The importance of mangrove forest in tsunami disaster mitigation
207
development and preservation of coastal forest should be seen, therefore, as an eco­
friendly solution to tsunami and storm surge disasters.
  There are less than 15 million hectares of mangrove forest (Philippe et al., 2005) 
across 60,000 square miles of warm water areas of tropical oceans worldwide. Accord­
ing to a 2003 report of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations 
(Wilkie and Fortuna, 2003), approximately 41 per cent of the world’s mangrove 
forest is in Australia, Brazil, Indonesia and Nigeria; some 60 per cent of the total 
mangrove area is situated in just 10 countries. Despite the fact that mangrove forests 
offer multifaceted benefits to coastal communities and the environment, a signifi­
cant amount has been destroyed over the past few decades. In the last 20 years, the 
world has lost almost 50 per cent of its mangrove forests, making them one of the 
most endangered landscapes (MIC, 2006). Figure 2 shows the rate of mangrove 
forest destruction in each continent. Coastal forest has been significantly depleted 
in Asia and North and South America (Wilkie and Fortuna, 2003). In Africa, though, 
the second largest continent in terms of coastal forest resources, the rate of forest 
destruction is very low. The primary causes of coastal forest destruction on all 
continents are climate variation, urbanisation, industrialisation, aquaculture develop­
ment, mining, tourism, and coastal area protection works and agriculture. The most 
notable contributors are the supply/accumulation of crude oil and other pollutants, 
Figure 2 Global trend in mangrove forest destruction
Destruction 
trend (%)
Asia
Africa
South America
N & C America
Oceania
1980–90
-14.9
-5.2
-42.1
-13.1
-8.0
1990–2000
-12.8
-3.4
-10.4
-14.3
-10.4
1980–2000
-25.8
-8.4
-48.1
-25.5
-17.5
background image
Rabindra Osti, Shigenobu Tanaka and Toshikazu Tokioka
208 
prolonged flooding by artificial dikes or causeways, the activities of charcoal and 
timber industries, the development of hotels, recreational facilities and other infra­
structure, land encroachment, excavation and uprooting for mining, the rapidly 
expanding shrimp aquaculture industry, environmental stresses such as remarkably 
high salinity, and overexploitation of forest for firewood and building materials.
  The above accompany the trend of increasing coastal populations (see Figure 3) 
and coastal area development. Fifty per cent of the world’s population currently 
lives within 60 kilometres of the shore, which translates in 2007 to more than three 
billion people (World Bank, 2007). A technical report of the United Nations Environ­
mental Programme (UNEP, 2005) states that average population density in coastal 
zones was 77 people per square kilometre in 2002, compared to 87 in 2000. It is 
predicted that this will rise to 99, 115 and 134 people per square kilometre in 2010, 
2025 and 2050, respectively.
  Although the global population rise is not directly related to coastal forest destruc­
tion, it is indirectly responsible for the consumption of forest products. The destruc­
tion of coastal forest and the simultaneous rise in the coastal population have exposed 
communities to high tsunami and storm surge risks and led to adverse environmental 
impacts. Moreover, there is a threat of deforestation in the name of reconstruction 
(Kazmin, 2005; MAP, 2005; Barbier, 2006) and there is always a chance of illegal 
felling of trees and encroachment of forestland. These consequences have made 
rehabilitated and existing coastal population more vulnerable to tsunami disasters. 
Figure 4 illustrates the dynamic cycle of forest destruction and the associated rising 
Figure 3 Increase in coastal population density by continent
Source: UNEP, 2005.
background image
The importance of mangrove forest in tsunami disaster mitigation
209
tsunami risk process. The breakthrough of the mangrove destruction cycle shown 
in Figure 4 is only possible by prescribing appropriate strategies and implementing 
them to preserve and develop coastal forest.
Development prospect
Technical aspects
There are several species of mangrove plant: some grow in saline and sandy soil, 
while others prefer to live very close to freshwater bodies such as rivers. It is still a 
matter of argument what kind of plant in rehabilitated mangrove ecosystems is effec­
tive in mitigating the impact of tsunami disasters. When developing greenbelt along 
the coast, several non­mangrove species are sometimes proposed. The decision, though, 
should not only be based on the shape and size of plants, but also on factors such as 
their growth rate, life span, role in the ecosystem, and benefits to communities.
  The development of mangrove forest has recently achieved wide placing on the 
national and international agenda, although many governments still consider man­
grove forest as wasteland or useless swamp. This means that effective policies and 
management strategies for coastal forest development remain weak. Attempts made 
Figure 4 Deforestation and co-related risk rising process in Tsunami disasters
background image
Rabindra Osti, Shigenobu Tanaka and Toshikazu Tokioka
210 
to develop coastal forest over the past few decades have been mostly unsuccessful, 
although projects sometimes appear successful one year after mangrove plantation 
or rehabilitation (MSNBC News, 2005). It is essential therefore to examine whether 
mangroves are mature, healthy, and able to protect communities from tsunamis of 
a certain magnitude. Even a small­scale tsunami can often destroy immature plants 
and thus an additional level of structural protection may be required.
  Besides the age and stiffness of plants, density, orientation and geometry of planta­
tion are also very important variables. The density of forest greatly depends on plant 
type, spacing, height, and the existence of inner plants. However, when plants grow 
with a considerable amount of leaves and branches in the upper part, the density 
decreases comparatively at ground level. To improve density in the lower part, 
several other tree species can be grown, possibly promoting agroforestry for the 
benefit of coastal communities. The techniques of plantation, such as square, zigzag 
or circular, can also improve the forest’s ability to counter a tsunami. If necessary, 
supplementary temporary or semi­permanent structural measures can be utilised to 
enhance the counter functions. If it is not possible to increase the density of forest 
or to establish structural measures, arrays of arbustive species can be developed sepa­
rately shore side. If a significant tsunami occurs and these plants are washed away, 
the mangrove forest will intercept them and provide better resistance to the event. 
Similarly,  some  other  parallel  rows  of  coastal  parks  or  agricultural  fields  can  be 
developed in such a way as to increase the resistance of the system to a tsunami. In 
developing a coastal forest to protect a community from a tsunami, several other 
aspects, especially ones of socio­economic and cultural value, should be taken into 
account. To address all of these issues effectively, priority should be given to field 
research.
Implementation
Although tsunamis are mostly the product of earthquakes caused by the displace­
ment of plates in the process of energy release, such events can recur over time and 
may generate a devastating tsunami in the region. To protect coastal communities 
from potential tsunami hazards, sufficient preparation is required. Since mangrove 
forest is a natural solution and has multifaceted benefits for the environment and 
people, it should be promoted in an appropriate manner. A tsunami is not danger­
ous if the wave magnitude can be reduced to an acceptable limit, yet the provision 
of massive structural measures for that purpose may not be appropriate for a variety 
of reasons. Sometimes structural interventions yield an additional threat to the coastal 
people and environment, and therefore are not a primary solution. However, struc­
tural countermeasures can be considered as secondary or supplementary initiatives. 
Non­structural measures such as a flood hazard map, warning, and evacuation are 
essential to safeguard people’s lives.
  Figure 5 shows methods of maintaining permissible risk for increasing tsunami 
magnitude, with the size of the tsunami (such as small, moderate or large) and 
background image
The importance of mangrove forest in tsunami disaster mitigation
211
potential damage expressed in relative terms. However, size and damage could vary 
from one instance to another.
  Forests destroyed by a tsunami must be rehabilitated according to scientific knowl­
edge. In so doing, one should not ignore the traditional value of coastal forest to 
nature and people. Mangrove ecosystems have been well managed by populations 
for centuries and mangrove forest still serves as a shelter for many indigenous 
populations around the world. Therefore, the societal, environmental and economic 
dimensions of mangrove forest development should be considered while optimising 
the advantages.
  Several national and international organisations are working in the sectors of 
tsunami disaster mitigation and some of them are focusing on mangrove forest 
development, while others are concentrating on habitat reconstruction or poverty 
eradication. The ultimate goal of tsunami disaster mitigation can be achieved by 
effectively coordinating all of these activities in an integrated manner. At the grass­
roots, this is possible by adopting community­based disaster management practices. 
A concept of community forest can be promoted as an entry point to holistic develop­
ment of a coastal community. A community­based development approach has already 
gained full recognition as a means for sustainable development and now there is a 
clear belief that tsunami risk management cannot be treated in isolation—it should 
be part of community development. In addition, community­based tsunami miti­
gation could be the best way to eliminate overlap and duplication in the development 
Figure 5 Tsunami risk reduction strategy with different  
possible combinations of control measures
background image
Rabindra Osti, Shigenobu Tanaka and Toshikazu Tokioka
212 
approach. However, there are still some points to be cleared up, such as how the 
idea can be integrated into community­based development as well as into a sustain­
able poverty eradication plan.
  Tsunami hazard mapping can guide this development process, so it is essential to 
launch a campaign aimed at allowing communities to understand their vulnerabil­
ities, strategies and activities, and the role that they could play in managing flood 
risks without relying on external entities. A flood hazard map, which has been very 
effective in facilitating the safe and smooth evacuation of people in an emergency 
(Osti, Shigenobu and Toshikazu, 2008), could be a fundamental tool for community­
based tsunami disaster management. The community­based approach will not only 
correct the defects of the top­down approach, but also encourage stakeholder par­
ticipation in a holistic fashion.
Conclusion
The Earth is home to some 6.5 billion people, many of whom reside in coastal areas, 
exposed to the direct risk of tsunami and storm surges. Over the past few decades, 
almost one million people have been killed and millions of US dollars of property 
has been damaged by tsunami events in different parts of the world. Nature has 
presented itself as a possible instrument with which to mitigate the impact of such 
disasters by growing mangrove forests along coastal areas, which can considerably 
reduce the energy of tsunami waves moving in the direction of land. Coastal forests 
also have several additional advantages for people and nature. Unfortunately, these 
natural shields are declining daily because of natural processes and increasing global 
demand for land, food and forest products.
  It is becoming difficult to recover these natural resources because of the changing 
environment and unfavourable human interactions. Therefore, special attention has 
to be paid to developing and preserving these valuable resources. To maximise the 
benefits and to minimise the risk of a tsunami, a practical approach should be 
adopted, for which interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary studies are a prerequisite. 
Community­based tsunami risk management and a community forest approach 
should be promoted to advance holistic development of coastal communities. Tsunami 
hazard mapping practices can be encouraged to facilitate the development process. 
In fact, tsunami hazard maps are very useful for endorsing appropriate land use 
planning and in the interim, generating awareness as well as promoting safe and 
smooth evacuation in emergencies.
Correspondence
Rabindra Osti, International Centre for Water Hazard and Risk Management, 
Public Work Research Institute, Minamihara 1­6, 305­8516 Tsukuba, Japan. E­mail: 
osti55@pwri.go.jp.
background image
The importance of mangrove forest in tsunami disaster mitigation
213
References
Barbier, B.E. (2006) ‘Natural barriers to natural disasters: replanting Mangroves after the tsunami’. 
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 4(3). pp. 124–131.
Dahdouh­Guebas, F. et al. (2005) ‘How effective were Mangroves as a defence against the recent 
tsunami?’. Current Biology. 15(12). pp. 443–447. 
Hiraishi, T. (2005) ‘Greenbelt technique for tsunami disaster reduction’. Proceedings of the APEC-
EqTAP Seminar on Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Reduction, Jakarta, Indonesia. pp. 1–6.
IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources) (2005) Early 
Observations of Tsunami Effects on Mangroves and Coastal Forests. IUCN, Gland.
Kathiresan, K. and N. Rajendran (2005) ‘Coastal Mangrove forests mitigated tsunami’. Estuarine, 
Coastal and Shelf Science. 65(3). pp. 601–606.
Kazmin, A. (2005) ‘Disputes Over Land Threaten New Start’. Financial Times. 22 December. http://
us.ft.com/ftgateway/superpage.ft?news_id=fto122220051231441533. 
Kerr, A.M., A.H. Baird and S.J. Campbell (2006) ‘Comments on ‘‘Coastal Mangrove forests miti­
gated tsunami” by K. Kathiresan and N. Rajendran [Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci. 65 (2005) 601e606]’. 
Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science. 67(3). pp. 539–541.
MAP (The Mangrove Action Project) (2005) ‘Public Forum to Counter Forest Encroachment’. The 
Mangrove Action Project News. 155. 16 May.
Mazda, Y., M. Magi, Y. Ikeda, T. Kurokawa and T. Asano (2006) ‘Wave reduction in a Mangrove 
forest dominated by Sonneratia sp’. Wetlands Ecology and Management. 14(4). pp. 365–378.
MIC (Mangrove Information Centre) (2006) About Mangroves. Official Brochure of the MIC.
MSNBC News (2005) ‘Mangrove Forests Seen as Life­savers in Tsunami’. Reuters. 24 January.
Osti, R. (2004) ‘Forms of community­participation and agencies role for the implementation of 
water­induced disaster management: protecting and enhancing the poor’. Disaster Prevention and 
Management.
 13(2). pp. 6–13.
Osti, R., T. Shigenobu and T. Toshikazu (2008) ‘Flood hazard mapping in developing countries; a 
prospect and problems’. Disaster Prevention and Management. 17(1). pp. 104–113.
Padma, T.V. (2004) ‘Mangrove forests can reduce Impact of tsunamis’. SciDev.Net. 30 December. 
http://www.scidev.net/en/news/mangrove­forests­can­reduce­impact­of­tsunamis.html.
Philippe, M. et al. (2005) ‘Tropical forest cover change in the 1990s and options for future monitoring’. 
Philosophical Transactions of Royal Society. B 360. pp. 373–384.
Selvam, V. (2005) Impact Assessment for Mangrove and Shelterbelt Plantation. Tsunami for Tamil Nadu 
Forestry Project, M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation, New Delhi.
UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme) (2005) Assessing Coastal Vulnerability Developing 
A Global Index For Measuring Risk. UNEP, Nairobi.
Upadhyay, V.P., R. Ranjan and J.S. Singh (2002) ‘Human–mangrove conflicts: The way out’. Current 
Science. 83(11). pp. 2328–2336.
Wilkie, M.L. and S. Fortuna (2003) Status and Trends in Mangrove Area Extent Worldwide, Forest Resources 
Assessment. Working Paper No. 63. Forest Resources Division, Food and Agriculture Organiza­
tion of the United Nations (FAO), Rome. 
Williams, N. (2005) ‘Tsunami insight to Mangrove value’. Current Biology. 15(3). pp. 73–79.
Wolanski, E. (2007) Estuarine Ecohydrology. Elsevier, Amsterdam.
World Bank (2007) ‘Coastal & Marine Management’. http://go.worldbank.org/FWQVNO6O80.